CfP Democracy, Leadership & Digitalization

Leadership, Education, Personality: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Führung, Bildung, Persönlichkeit

Editor-in-Chief: Werner G. Faix
Responsible Associate Editor: Harald Pechlaner
Guest Editor: Daria Habicher

Call for Papers – Democracy, Leadership & Digitalization
How to revise and develop or rethink traditional approaches of political, social and economic organization?

Leadership, Education, Personality: An Interdisciplinary Journal invites article submissions for a special issue on the topic of Democracy, Leadership & Digitalization. Submissions can be made in English or German.

Advancing globalization is accompanied by, among other things, socio-economic and ecological challenges, falling growth rates and political instability. This accelerates the reflection on existing and alternative forms of political, social and economic organization as well as on leadership practices. The overall aim to build a more sustainable world is accompanied by the question of how such alternatives of development might look. Especially since the global community has been affected by the COVID-19 crisis and its consequences since December 2019, a new wave of discussions about digitalization as a driving force of change has emerged and which also raises questions about democracy and leadership.


Democracy
Democracy has always been a broadly and controversially discussed concept. Even today a consensus does not exist as to whether democracy is to be evaluated as something exclusively positive or rather as something partly negative (Schmidt, 2019). There is still no agreement about democracy being a “government of the people, by the people, and for the people“, as Abraham Lincoln said, or a „government of the elite, for the rich“ (Elsässer et al., 2018). 
Over time, the complexity of societies has risen, which again has led to fundamental changes of democratic systems. For example, from the 1980s onwards the theoretical model of participatory democracy experienced a strong decline, whereas the model of deliberative democracy flourished (Kane & Patapan, 2012). Nowadays, in most of the European countries the deliberative democracy prevails. It emphasizes the public discourse, the public deliberation, the participation of citizens in public communication as well as the interaction of deliberation and the decision-making process. “This change seems profound for one, because much of what was once constant is now up for redefinition, such as the balance of global power vis-à-vis politics and economics” (Faix et al., 2019, p. 3).
Does democracy now require redefining as profound changes are brought about by the progressive digitalization? Digitalization undoubtedly offers new ways of designing democratic institutions as well as participation and decision making processes. It also opens up new economic perspectives, as demonstrated by the example of the sharing and subscription economy. Another example at the interface between digitalization, democracy and economy is the so-called platform cooperativism, a technology-based way of organizing and strengthening communities of different sizes and interests (Scholz, 2017).  
Consequently, democracy should not only be discussed and practiced in political spheres but also in other areas: Organizational sociology promotes the idea that a democratic society needs democratically structured enterprises in order to endure (Kühl, 2015; Sattelberger et al., 2015). According to Beck (1999), the democratization of organizations might lead to a better understanding of democratic processes and strengthen democracy as a whole. 


Leadership
As with the questions of democracy, different approaches of leadership are discussed over time. Some focus on specific elements of leadership, while others are very broad in its understanding. For example, according to Hemphill & Coons (1957), leadership is “the behaviour of an individual […] directing the activities of a group towards a shared goal” (p.7), while Yukl (2013) emphasises that leadership is the “process of influencing others to understand and agree about what needs to be done and how to do it, and the process of facilitating individual and collective efforts to accomplish shared objectives” (p.23). In terms of political leadership, to lead means to assume responsibility for their own followers (Grint, 2010). This means not only taking decisions for a business, an organization, a region or a state, but also facing existing challenges and accordingly preparing for future scenarios. Furthermore, “today’s challenges require leaders who can empower others without absolving themselves of responsibility” (Hatour, 2016). Therefore, and following the transformational leadership approach, a leader should act as a role model, inspiring, stimulating and motivating the followers to be creative and innovative, by exemplifying certain values (Harrison, 2018). Beside political leadership, enterprises and organizations from different sectors also need leaders to evolve. In some cases, successful business leaders also have a positive effect on the attitude of his or her employees, their surroundings and thus of the society at large (Beck, 1999). Accordingly, to lead means to have a common vision and follow concrete objectives as an entity, but at the same time permit the employees to take responsibility, to realize themselves and to let them take their own course (Hinterhuber, 2003).


Digitalization
On one hand, digitalization is a big chance for existing systems and for emerging leadership strategies in politics and the economy. On the other hand, questions about new challenges regarding the accessibility, data security, privacy and the rule of law arise. The Chinese form of political capitalism enables economic development, though limiting individual political and personal rights (Milanovic, 2020) and thus, it also implies a special role of political leadership. In contrast, the western form of capitalism is embedded in the context of democracy and the rule of law. These two and further different interpretations of political and economic leadership will increasingly be part of future discussions about alternative forms of societies, politics and economics and values they are based on.

Finally, the big challenge lies in designing alternative democratic structures and leadership practices so that they can contribute to the success of the entity itself and thus to the public welfare. Different questions emerge: Which alternatives will emerge at the interface between digitalization, democracy and leadership? Do we expect “the end of democracy as we know it” and stand at the beginning of a “digital democracy”? What kind of political, economic or entrepreneurial leadership is evolving? 

The present call for papers moves along the interface between digitalization, democracy and leadership, and therefore requests interdisciplinary as well as multidisciplinary reflections. Scholars from any background are invited to contribute. The submission deadline for the abstracts (max. 300 words) is the 15th July 2020. Please send your abstract to Mrs Daria Habicher (daria.habicher@eurac.edu). Feedback will then be provided within July 2020, with instructions on how to write the article, which must be submitted by the end of January 2021 in order to start the review process. The accepted abstracts can be presented and discussed during the conference “Digitalization: Futures of Democracy and Economy”, which will take place at research center Eurac Research (www.eurac.edu) in Bolzano (Italy) on the 29th and 30th October 2020. Participants are invited to hold short presentations (of 10 minutes) within the framework of a digital format. Further details about the date and the discussion format will be communicated latest end of July 2020. 

References
Beck, U. (1999). Die Zukunft von Arbeit und Demokratie, Edition Zweite Moderne, Berlin: Suhrkamp. 
Elsässer, L., Hense, S., Schäfer, A. (2018). Government of the Elite, for the Rich. Unequal Responsiveness in an Unlikely Case. MPIfG. Köln.
Faix, W. G., Kisgen, S. & Mergenthaler, J. (2019). LEADERSHIP. PERSONALITY.  INNOVATION. Stuttgart: Steinbeis-Edition.
Grint, K. (2010): Leadership. A Very Short Introduction, Oxford.
Harrison, C. (2018). Leadership Research and Theory. A Critical Approach to New and Existing Paradigms. Palgrave Macmillan Verlag. Cham. 
Hatour, N. (2016). The future of democracy needs a new kind of leader. Retrieved from https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/the-future-of-democracy-needs-a-new-kind-of-leader/.
Hemphill, J. K. & Coons, A. E. (1957). Development of the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire. In R. Stogdill and A. Coons (Eds). Leader Behavior: Its Description and Measurement. Columbus, Ohio: Bureau of Business Research.
Hinterhuber, H. H. (2003). Leadership. Strategisches Denken systematisch schulen von Sokrates bis Jack Welch. Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Verlag. Frankfurt am Main.
Kane, J., & Patapan, H. (im Druck). The Democratic Leader. How Democracy Defines, Empowers and Limits its Leaders. Research Gate, 10–29. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199650477.001.0001.
Kühl, S. (2015). Wie demokratisch können Unternehmen sein? In Wirtschaft + Weiterbildung,06, pp. 19-24.
Milanovic, B. (2020). The Clash of Capitalisms. The Real Fight for the Global Economy's Future. In Foreign Affairs (January/ February), pp. 10-21.
Sattelberger, T., Welpe, I., & Boes, A. (2015) (Hrsg.). Das demokratische Unternehmen. Neue Arbeits- und Führungskulturen im Zeitalter digitaler Wirtschaft, Freiburg & München: Haufe Gruppe.
Schmidt, M. (2019). Demokratietheorie. Eine Einführung. 6. Auflage. Springer VS. Wiesbaden.
Scholz, T. (2017). Platform Cooperativism vs. the Sharing Economy. In: Douay N. & Wan A. (Hrsg.). Big Data & Civic Engagement. Planum publisher. Roma-Milano.
Yukl, G. (2013). Leadership in Organizations (8th ed.). Harlow: Pearson.


Leadership, Education, Personality: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Interdisziplinäre Zeitschrift für Führung, Bildung, Persönlichkeit

Editor-in-Chief: Werner G. Faix
Responsible Associate Editor: Harald Pechlaner
Guest Editor: Daria Habicher

Call for Papers – Democracy, Leadership & Digitalization Wie können traditionelle Ansätze der politischen, sozialen und ökonomischen Organisation
überdacht und weiterentwickelt oder neu gedacht werden?

Für eine Sonderausgabe zum Journal Leadership, Education, Personality: An Interdisciplinary Journal werden hiermit Beiträge zum Thema Democracy, Leadership & Digitalization eingeladen. Sowohl deutsch- als englischsprachige Beiträge sind möglich.

Die fortschreitende Globalisierung geht unter anderem mit sozio-ökonomischen und ökologischen Herausforderungen, sinkenden Wachstumsraten und politischer Instabilität einher. Dies beschleunigt das Nachdenken über bestehende und alternative Formen der politischen, sozialen und ökonomischen Organisation, sowie auch über Leadership-Praktiken. Das übergeordnete Ziel, eine nachhaltigere Welt aufzubauen, geht einher mit der Frage, wie solche Alternativen der Entwicklung aussehen könnten. Insbesondere seit die Weltgemeinschaft seit Dezember 2019 von COVID-19 und den Folgen einer Pandemie betroffen ist, entstand eine neue Welle von Diskussionen über Digitalisierung als treibende Kraft des Wandels, die auch Fragen zu Demokratie und Leadership aufwirft.


Demokratie
Demokratie ist seit jeher ein breit und kontrovers diskutiertes Konzept. Nach wie vor gibt es keinen klaren Konsens darüber, ob Demokratie als etwas ausschließlich Positives zu bewerten ist, oder auch als etwas teilweise Negatives (Schmidt, 2019). Noch immer besteht keine Übereinstimmung darüber, ob Demokratie die Herrschaft des Volkes, durch das Volk und für das Volk ist, wie es Abraham Lincoln vorschwebte, oder vielmehr die Herrschaft der Elite und für die Reichen (Elsässer et al., 2018). 
Mit der Zeit hat die Komplexität von Gesellschaften immer weiter zugenommen, was zu grundlegenden Veränderungen der demokratischen Systeme geführt hat. So erlebte beispielsweise ab den 1980er Jahren das theoretische Modell der partizipativen Demokratie einen starken Rückgang, während das Modell der deliberativen Demokratie aufblühte (Kane & Patapan, 2012). Gegenwärtig ist in den meisten europäischen Ländern eine Form der deliberativen Demokratie vorherrschend. Sie betont den öffentlichen Diskurs, die öffentliche Beratung, die Beteiligung der BürgerInnen an der öffentlichen Kommunikation, genauso wie die Interaktion von Beratung und Entscheidungsprozessen. Dieser Wandel scheint tiefgründig zu sein, weil vieles von dem, was einst konstant war, nun neu definiert werden muss, wie zum Beispiel das Gleichgewicht der globalen Macht in Bezug auf Politik und Wirtschaft (Faix et al., 2019). 
Angesichts der tiefgreifenden Veränderungen, die mit der voranschreitenden Digitalisierung einhergehen, stellt sich die Frage, ob Demokratie nun wieder vor einer Neudefinition steht. Zweifellos bietet die Digitalisierung gänzlich neue Wege für die Gestaltung von demokratischen Institutionen, Partizipation und Entscheidungsfindungsprozessen. Sie eröffnet außerdem neue Perspektiven der Ökonomie, wie das Beispiel von Sharing und Subscription Economies zeigt. Ein weiteres Beispiel an der Schnittstelle von Digitalisierung, Demokratie und Ökonomie stellt der sogenannte Platform Cooperativism dar, eine technologiebasierte Art der Organisation und Stärkung von Gemeinschaften unterschiedlicher Größen und Interessen (Scholz, 2017). 
Aus diesem Grund sollte Demokratie nicht nur in der politischen Sphäre, sondern auch in anderen Bereichen diskutiert und praktiziert werden: Die Organisationssoziologie stützt die Idee, dass demokratische Gesellschaften demokratisch organisierte Unternehmen brauchen, um langfristig Bestand haben zu können (Kühl, 2015; Sattelberger et al. 2015). Nach Beck (1999) könnte die Demokratisierung von Organisationen zu einem besseren Verständnis von demokratischen Prozessen führen und die Demokratie als solche stärken. 
 

Leadership
Ebenso wie bei Fragen der Demokratie wurden auch im Zusammenhang mit Leadership im Laufe der Zeit unterschiedliche Ansätze diskutiert. Einige konzentrieren sich ausschließlich auf bestimmte Elemente von Leadership, während andere ein sehr breites Verständnis davon haben. Nach Hemphill und Coons (1957) ist Leadership das Verhalten eines Individuums, während es an der Leitung von Gruppenaktivitäten beteiligt ist. Yukl (2013) dagegen betont, dass Leadership sowohl den Prozess beschreibt, andere zu beeinflussen, damit sie verstehen und sich darüber einig werden, was zu tun ist und wie etwas zu tun ist, als auch der Prozess der Erleichterung individueller und kollektiver Bemühungen, gemeinsame Ziele zu erreichen. In Bezug auf politische Führung bedeutet Leadership, Verantwortung für die eigenen Anhänger zu übernehmen (Grint, 2010). Das bedeutet nicht nur, Entscheidungen für ein Unternehmen, eine Organisation, eine Region oder einen Staat zu treffen, sondern auch sich den bestehenden Herausforderungen zu stellen und sich entsprechend auf zukünftige Szenarien vorzubereiten. Darüber hinaus erfordern die Herausforderungen der heutigen Zeit Führungskräfte, die andere befähigen können, ohne sich selbst der Verantwortung zu entziehen (Hatour, 2016). Deshalb, und in Anlehnung an den transformatorischen Leadership-Ansatz, sollte eine Führungspersönlichkeit als Vorbild fungieren und ihre Anhänger dazu inspirieren, anregen und motivieren, kreativ und innovativ zu sein, indem sie selbst bestimmte Werte vorlebt (Harrison, 2018). Neben der politischen Leadership brauchen auch Unternehmen und Organisationen aus unterschiedlichsten Bereichen Führungspersönlichkeiten, um sich weiterzuentwickeln. In einigen Fällen wirken sich erfolgreiche Unternehmens-Leader auch positiv auf die Einstellung ihrer Mitarbeiter, ihrer Umgebung und damit die Gesellschaft insgesamt aus (Beck, 1999). Führen bedeutet also, eine gemeinsame Vision zu haben und als Einheit konkrete Ziele zu verfolgen, aber gleichzeitig auch, de MitarbeiterInnen zu erlauben, Verantwortung zu unternehmen, sich selbst zu verwirklichen und sie ihre eigenen Wege gehen zu lassen (Hinterhuber, 2003).
 

Digitalisierung
Auf der einen Seite stellt die Digitalisierung eine große Chance für bestehende Systeme und neue Leadership-Strategien in Politik und Wirtschaft dar. Auf der anderen Seite stellen sich Fragen rund um neue Herausforderungen hinsichtlich der Zugänglichkeit, des Datenschutzes, der Privatsphäre und der Rechtsstaatlichkeit. Die chinesische Form des politischen Kapitalismus ermöglicht wirtschaftliche Entwicklung und Wachstum, schränkt aber politische und persönliche Rechte ein (Milanovic, 2020) und impliziert daher eine besondere Rolle von politischer Leadership. Im Gegensatz dazu ist die westliche Form des Kapitalismus in den Kontext von Demokratie und Rechtsstaatlichkeit eingebettet. Diese beiden und weitere Interpretationen von politischer und wirtschaftlicher Leadership werden zunehmend Teil zukünftiger Debatten über alternative Gesellschafts-, Politik- und Wirtschaftsformen sowie der ihnen zugrundeliegenden Werte sein.  
Schließlich besteht die große Herausforderung darin, alternative demokratische Strukturen und Leadership-Praktiken so zu gestalten, dass sie zum Erfolg der Entität selbst und demzufolge auch zum Gemeinwohl beitragen können. In diesem Zusammenhang stellen sich verschiedene Fragen: Welche Alternativen werden an der Schnittstelle von Digitalisierung, Demokratie und Leadership entstehen? Erwarten wir das Ende der Demokratie, wie wir sie kennen und stehen am Anfang einer neuen, digitalen Demokratie? Welche Arten von politischer, ökonomischer und unternehmerischer Führung werden sich entwickeln? 
Dieser vorliegende Call for Papers bewegt sich an der Schnittstelle von Digitalisierung, Demokratie und Leadership und erfordert daher inter- und multidisziplinäre Reflexionsansätze. WissenschaftlerInnen aller Disziplinen sind dazu eingeladen, ihre Beiträge einzureichen. Die Abgabefrist für Abstracts (max. 300 Wörter) ist der 15. Juli 2020. Bitte senden Sie Ihren Abstract an Frau Daria Habicher (daria.habicher@eurac.edu). Ein Feedback wird dann innerhalb Juli 2020 mitgeteilt, mit Hinweisen für das Verfassen des Beitrages, welcher bis Ende Januar 2021 eingereicht werden muss, um den Review-Prozess starten zu können. Die angenommenen Abstracts können auch im Rahmen der Konferenz „Digitalisierung: Zukünfte von Demokratie und Wirtschaft“ präsentiert und diskutiert werden. Die Konferenz wird am 29. und 30. Oktober 2020 am Forschungsinstitut Eurac Research (www.eurac.edu) in Bozen (Italien) stattfinden. Die TeilnehmerInnen sind eingeladen, kurze Präsentationen (10 Minuten) in einem digitalen Format zu halten. Weitere Details über das genaue Datum und das Diskussionsformat werden spätestens Ende Juli 2020 kommuniziert.


Literatur

Beck, U. (1999). Die Zukunft von Arbeit und Demokratie, Edition Zweite Moderne, Berlin: Suhrkamp. 
Elsässer, L., Hense, S., Schäfer, A. (2018). Government of the Elite, for the Rich. Unequal Responsiveness in an Unlikely Case. MPIfG. Köln.
Faix, W. G., Kisgen, S. & Mergenthaler, J. (2019). LEADERSHIP. PERSONALITY.  INNOVATION. Stuttgart: Steinbeis-Edition.
Grint, K. (2010): Leadership. A Very Short Introduction, Oxford.
Harrison, C. (2018). Leadership Research and Theory. A Critical Approach to New and Existing Paradigms. Palgrave Macmillan Verlag. Cham. 
Hatour, N. (2016). The future of democracy needs a new kind of leader. Retrieved from https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/11/the-future-of-democracy-needs-a-new-kind-of-leader/.
Hemphill, J. K. & Coons, A. E. (1957). Development of the Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire. In R. Stogdill and A. Coons (Eds). Leader Behavior: Its Description and Measurement. Columbus, Ohio: Bureau of Business Research.
Hinterhuber, H. H. (2003). Leadership. Strategisches Denken systematisch schulen von Sokrates bis Jack Welch. Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Verlag. Frankfurt am Main.
Kane, J., & Patapan, H. (im Druck). The Democratic Leader. How Democracy Defines, Empowers and Limits its Leaders. Research Gate, 10–29. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199650477.001.0001.
Kühl, S. (2015). Wie demokratisch können Unternehmen sein? In Wirtschaft + Weiterbildung,06, S. 19-24.
Milanovic, B. (2020). The Clash of Capitalisms. The Real Fight for the Global Economy's Future. In Foreign Affairs (January/ February), pp. 10–21.
Sattelberger, T., Welpe, I., & Boes, A. (2015) (Hrsg.). Das demokratische Unternehmen. Neue Arbeits- und Führungskulturen im Zeitalter digitaler Wirtschaft, Freiburg & München: Haufe Gruppe.
Schmidt, M. (2019). Demokratietheorie. Eine Einführung. 6. Auflage. Springer VS. Wiesbaden.
Scholz, T. (2017). Platform Cooperativism vs. the Sharing Economy. In: Douay N. & Wan A. (Hrsg.). Big Data & Civic Engagement. Planum publisher. Roma-Milano.
Yukl, G. (2013). Leadership in Organizations (8th ed.). Harlow: Pearson.
 

Download CfP (PDF)