Submission guidelines

Instructions for Authors

General

If you are interested in submitting a paper to Pharmaceutical Research, please first review the following information.

AIM & SCOPE

Pharmaceutical Research, an official journal of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, is committed to publishing novel research that is innovative, mechanism-based, hypothesis-driven, and supported by sound experimental design, methodology, and data interpretation. Pharmaceutical Research publishes articles containing novel research concepts, ideas, and findings of broad interest to the scientific community in drug discovery, clinical testing, and regulatory evaluation.

ARTICLE TYPES

Research Papers are the foundation of Pharmaceutical Research. Priority is given to papers focusing on current areas of interest, which include the following:

Transport/Metabolism: Regulation of transporters and enzymes, disease states, SNPs, transporter genomics/genomics, protein structure and function, transporter-/enzyme-mediated toxicity, drug-drug interactions, preclinical-to-clinical translation.

Drug Delivery and Targeting: Multifunctional nanosystems; stimuli-responsive, image-guided, and organelle-targeted delivery systems; laser lithography; molecular imprinting; electrospinning; supercritical fluid technology; quantification in organelles; noninvasive monitoring; new measures for quantifying delivery system interactions with biological tissues; and whole animal quantification of cell/organelle targeting; identification and validation of new mechanisms for uptake, efflux, and transcytosis; and identification of new clearance mechanisms.

Pharmacology, Genomics, and Biotechnology: Genomics, proteomics, and metabolonomics of new/novel therapeutic agents; biotechnology of SiRNA, microRNAs, and new antibodies.

Modeling/PK/PD/Simulations: Increased mechanistic understanding of PK/PD models, novel QSAR, QSPR on ADME/Tox properties, improving PK/PD prediction-method development.

Biopharmaceutics: Advancing physio-chemical models of drug and formulation performance with emphasis on molecular details of physiology and chemical processes, contributing to mechanistic interpretation of physiological and chemical process models, well-developed examples of novel mechanistic model building and validation of molecular details.

Preformulation: Application of new physical methods with the goal of uncovering new molecular details of condensed media, molecular-based studies of the control of surface chemistry of solid particles in the micrometer and nanometer range, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of solubilization of poorly-soluble molecules from dispersed systems, derivation, evaluation and validation new physicochemical models of condensed state material, evaluation and validation of new physicochemical models of condensed state materials with emphasis on molecular details, molecular-level evaluation and consequences of water-drug interactions.

Formulation: Application of new formulation approaches with relevant evaluation of proposed mechanisms, molecular evaluation of novel formulation excipients in biologically-relevant in vivo models, focus on the molecular details of formulation approaches of drug targeting, demonstration of relevant and validated IVIVC correlations based on molecular characteristics of formation.

Papers that are merely descriptive or confirmatory in nature, are poorly written, lack a hypothesis, fail to offer new insights, or contain conclusions that are not supported by data are unlikely to be accepted for publication in Pharmaceutical Research.

In addition to research papers, Pharmaceutical Research also publishes Expert Reviews, Perspectives, and Commentaries by invitation or consent of the Expert Review Editor, Joseph Nicolazzo

Letters to the Editor provide a forum for scientists to exchange views on work previously published in Pharmaceutical Research. Periodically, authors are invited to submit papers on highly relevant and interesting topics to be included in Theme Issues.

Publication Fees

There are no fees to submit or publish unless an author chooses to publish an article with color figures in print or if an author chooses to publish Open Access.

MANUSCRIPT GUIDELINES

LENGTH

For Research Papers and Expert Reviews, there is no limit to the number of pages, words, tables, or figures. Nevertheless, the manuscript presentation must be concise, and research papers should contain no more than approximately 40 references.

Commentaries should be limited to 1,500 words, less than ten references, and no more than one table or figure.

Perspectives should be limited to 2,500 words, less than 20 references, and no more than a total of two tables and/or figures.

FORMAT

All manuscripts must be double-spaced. Acceptable file formats include .doc, .docx, and .rtf, Please do not upload .pdf files. Your manuscript will be converted to a .pdf file by our submission management program, Editorial Manager.

COMPONENTS

Cover Letter

Each manuscript should be accompanied by a cover letter addressed to the Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Peter Swaan, and signed by the corresponding author on behalf of all authors. The cover letter should explicitly state that the manuscript has not been previously published in any language anywhere and that it is not under simultaneous consideration by another journal. The cover letter should also disclose if the manuscript has been previously rejected either by Pharmaceutical Research or another journal and should include a justification for resubmission. Authors may also use the cover letter to explain why the manuscript is suitable for publication in Pharmaceutical Research or to communicate any additional information of relevance.

Title Page

The title page should include the title of the article, authors’ full first and last names (no degrees), and affiliations, and suggested running head (of less than 50 characters, including spaces). Authors’ affiliations should include the department, institution (usually university or company), city, and state (or nation) and should be included as a footnote to the authors’ name. Please indicate the corresponding author designated to receive all communications and review proofs, and provide his/her complete mailing address, office/cellular telephone number, fax number, and e-mail address.

Abstract

Research Papers require a structured abstract of 200 words or less arranged under the following headings: Purpose, Methods, Results, Conclusions.

Sample structured abstract:

  • Purpose: The purpose of a structured abstract is to assist the authors in organizing their thoughts so as to highlight their work as well as to aid the readers to quickly grasp the essence of the paper

    Methods: The abstract is organized into four distinct sections: Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions.

    Results: A more informative abstract results.

    Conclusions: Requiring a structured abstract is a sound idea.

Expert Reviews and Perspectives also require an abstract, but it need not be structured. An abstract is not required of Commentaries or Letters to the Editor.

Keywords

For all manuscripts, please provide a list of no more than 5 keywords.

Main Text

Research Papers should be organized as follows: Abbreviations, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusion, Acknowledgments, References. Combining Results and Discussion is discouraged. Please avoid using more than three levels of headings.

Data Analysis

An accurate description of each set of data that is shown must be provided and must include the number of biological replicates, the number of experiments performed, and the description and use of appropriate statistical methods. Appropriate statistical methods should be used to test the significance of differences in results. The term “significant” should not be used unless statistically analyses were performed, and the probability value used to identify significance (generally P values) should be specified. The editors will not accept representative single experiments without the author’s written agreement to make available all of the replicate data upon request. Manuscripts submitted without evidence of reproducibility will be rejected without formal review.

Acknowledgments

All acknowledgments, including those for financial support, should be listed in a section to precede the References. Authors of manuscripts submitted to Pharmaceutical Research are requested to state the source of all funding that enabled the described research to be undertaken.

Abbreviations

Use abbreviations sparingly. Provide an Abbreviations section, a list of all nonstandard abbreviations, before the Introduction section. Use the metric system for all measurements. Express metric abbreviations in lowercase letters without periods (cm, ml, sec). Define all symbols used in equations and formulas. When symbols are used extensively, include a list of all symbols in the notation section.

References

References should conform to Vancouver Style (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors). Abbreviations for journal names should conform to those in the Bibliographic Guide for Editors and Authors (American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C.).

References to unpublished peer-reviews, personal communications, including conference abstracts, and papers in preparation or in review, cannot be listed, but can be notated parenthetically in the text.

Examples:

1. Kohane DS, Anderson DG, Yu C, Langer R. pH triggered release of macromolecules from spraydried polymethacrylate microparticles. Pharm Res. 2003;20(10):1533-1538. [Journal Article]

2. Swarbrick J, Boylan JC. Encyclopedia of pharmaceutical technology. New York: Marcel Dekker; 2001. [Book]

3. Lee VHL. Ocular epithelial models. In: Borchardt RT, Smith PL, Wilson G, editors. Models for assessing drug absorption and metabolism. New York: Plenum; 1996. p. 425-436. [Contribution to a Book]

4. Weisstein EW. Molecular orbital theory. Eric Weisstein's World of Science.; 2003 December 15. Available from: http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/chemistry/MolecularOrbital-Theory.html. [Website]

Tables

Tables should be numbered (with Roman numerals) and referred to by number in the text. Center the title above the table, and type explanatory footnotes (indicated by superscript lowercase letters) below the table.

Figures

Figures (including photographs, drawings, diagrams, and charts) are to be numbered in one consecutive series of Arabic numerals in the order in which they are cited in the text. The captions for illustrations should be separated from the text, and collated in a separate section called “Legend to Figures.” Electronic artwork should be in .tif, .eps, or .jpg format (1200 dpi for line and 300 dpi for half-tones and gray-scale art).

Pharmaceutical Research offers authors free color figures in both the online and print versions. For additional information on artwork guidelines, go to https://www.springer.com/gp/authors-editors/journal-author/journal-author-helpdesk/manuscript-preparation/1260

Footnotes

Footnotes should be avoided. When their use is absolutely necessary, footnotes should be numbered consecutively using Arabic numerals and should be typed at the bottom of the page to which they refer. Place a line above the footnote, so that it is set off from the text. Use the appropriate superscript numeral for citation in the text.

Appendices and Supplementary Material

Authors who wish to publish electronic supplementary material to their article (Excel files, images, audio/video files) may submit these files along with the manuscript via our online submission system. For more information, go to this

Link

SUBMISSION & REVIEW PROCESS

MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSION

Manuscripts should be submitted online to http://www.editorialmanager.com/pharmres. This web-based manuscript management system offers easy and straightforward login and submission procedures. It also allows you to track the progress of manuscript review in real time. After submitting a manuscript, you will need to review the converted PDF to ensure that all text, formulas, figures, and tables have been converted without errors. The manuscript will not be officially submitted to the journal until you have reviewed and approved the PDF.

If you are submitting an invited Expert Review, Commentary, Perspective, or Theme Issue manuscript, it is important that you do so through the invitations menu. After logging in as an author, click on “My Accepted Invitations” under the Invited Submissions head, then click “Submit Invited Manuscript” under the Action/Action Links menu for the theme issue invitation, select the appropriate theme issue title from the Article Type drop-down menu, and proceed through the submission process according to the system’s prompts.

SCREENING

After you have approved the PDF of your manuscript, it will be screened to ensure that all components have been submitted. Screened manuscripts then undergo an initial review, during which the Editor-in-Chief will either reject the manuscript if its quality and content are not in line with the aims of Pharmaceutical Research, or pass it along to an appropriate editor for further review. Papers that may not be granted a full review include, but are not limited to, those that are routine, are descriptive, are deficient in presentation, offer no insight, or appeal to a specialty audience.

REVIEW

Before a publication decision is made, your manuscript will be reviewed by at least two independent, anonymous peers in the field, in addition to the assigned editor. During the initial submission of your manuscript, you have the opportunity to suggest appropriate reviewers for your manuscript, as well as to list any to whom you are opposed. This phase of the review process typically takes about three to four weeks to complete.

DECISION

The editor will use the reviewers’ comments and recommendations to assist him or her in making a publication decision for your manuscript. At this point, the manuscript may be rejected, be accepted as is, or require minor or major revisions. In all cases, you may have access to the reviewers’ comments.

REVISION

If the editor returns your manuscript with the request for minor or major revisions, you will have 30 days to revise and return your manuscript. If you need longer than the 30 days to conduct additional research, you must contact your editor immediately in order to be granted an extension. You will be provided with reviewers’ comments and suggestions for revision in order to help you improve your manuscript.

After your revised manuscript is submitted, the editor and/or reviewers will review it again, and a new publication decision will be rendered. Revised manuscripts are not guaranteed acceptance; your revised manuscript may be rejected, be accepted, or require additional revisions.

PROOFS

If your paper is accepted, approximately two weeks later, you will receive an email from the production department alerting you that your page proofs are ready to be reviewed. Follow the instructions in this email to access your proofs and submit any changes. During this stage, you should proofread your paper for any typos, verify that all authors’ names and affiliations are accurate and spelled correctly, and confirm that all tables, figures, and formulas have been properly formatted. Authors are responsible for all statements in their work, including changes made by the copyeditor after a manuscript is accepted, so please review your proofs carefully.

ONLINE FIRST

All articles published in the journal will follow the Springer Online First production workflow, enabling publication on the SpringerLink website after receipt of author corrections to page proofs.

PRINT

Finally, accepted papers will appear in a print issue of Pharmaceutical Research.

TERMS OF MANUSCRIPT CONSIDERATION

FULL DISCLOSURE

Each manuscript must be accompanied by a cover letter signed by the corresponding author on behalf of all the authors. The cover letter should explicitly state that the manuscript has not been previously published in any language anywhere and that it is not under simultaneous consideration by another journal. Moreover, Pharmaceutical Research will not publish any manuscript unless the chemical structures of all compounds are fully disclosed, either by reference to prior work providing such data or by enclosure of such data in the manuscript.

COPYRIGHT TRANSFER

Authors with accepted papers may choose to transfer copyright to Springer or participate in Open Choice. For more information about Open Choice, go to http://www.springer.com/open+access/open+choice?SGWID=0-40359-0-0-0.

ETHICS IN ANIMAL AND CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS

Investigations using experimental animals must state in the Methods section that the research adhered to the ’’Principles of Laboratory Animal Care’’ (NIH publication #85-23, revised in 1985). Investigation with human subjects must state in the Methods section that the research followed the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki promulgated in 1964 and was approved by the institutional human experimentation committee or equivalent, and that informed consent was obtained.

SPRINGER PUBLISHING POLICIES

For information about the publisher’s policies, go to http://www.springer.com/authors/journal+authors?SGWID=0-154202-0-0-0.

PERMISSIONS

For information on obtaining permissions to reproduce content originally published in Pharmaceutical Research, go to https://www.springer.com/gp/rights-permissions/obtaining-permissions/882

Research Data Policy

A submission to the journal implies that materials described in the manuscript, including all relevant raw data, will be freely available to any researcher wishing to use them for non-commercial purposes, without breaching participant confidentiality.

The journal strongly encourages that all datasets on which the conclusions of the paper rely should be available to readers. We encourage authors to ensure that their datasets are either deposited in publicly available repositories (where available and appropriate) or presented in the main manuscript or additional supporting files whenever possible. Please see Springer Nature’s information on recommended repositories.

List of Repositories

Research Data Policy

General repositories - for all types of research data - such as figshare and Dryad may be used where appropriate.

Datasets that are assigned digital object identifiers (DOIs) by a data repository may be cited in the reference list. Data citations should include the minimum information recommended by DataCite: authors, title, publisher (repository name), identifier.

DataCite

Where a widely established research community expectation for data archiving in public repositories exists, submission to a community-endorsed, public repository is mandatory. Persistent identifiers (such as DOIs and accession numbers) for relevant datasets must be provided in the paper

For the following types of data set, submission to a community-endorsed, public repository is mandatory:

Mandatory depositionSuitable repositories
Protein sequencesUniprot
DNA and RNA sequencesGenbank

DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ)

EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (ENA)

DNA and RNA sequencing dataNCBI Trace Archive

NCBI Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

Genetic polymorphismsdbSNP

dbVar

European Variation Archive (EVA)

Linked genotype and phenotype datadbGAP

The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA)

Macromolecular structureWorldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB)

Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB)

Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB)

Microarray data (must be MIAME compliant)Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

ArrayExpress

Crystallographic data for small moleculesCambridge Structural Database

For more information:

Research Data Policy Frequently Asked Questions

Data availability

The journal encourages authors to provide a statement of Data availability in their article. Data availability statements should include information on where data supporting the results reported in the article can be found, including, where applicable, hyperlinks to publicly archived datasets analysed or generated during the study. Data availability statements can also indicate whether data are available on request from the authors and where no data are available, if appropriate.

Data Availability statements can take one of the following forms (or a combination of more than one if required for multiple datasets):

  • 1. The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available in the [NAME] repository, [PERSISTENT WEB LINK TO DATASETS]

  • 2. The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are not publicly available due [REASON WHY DATA ARE NOT PUBLIC] but are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

  • 3. The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

  • 4. Data sharing not applicable to this article as no datasets were generated or analysed during the current study.
  • 5. All data generated or analysed during this study are included in this published article [and its supplementary information files].

More examples of template data availability statements, which include examples of openly available and restricted access datasets, are available:

Data availability statements

Springer Nature provides a research data policy support service for authors and editors, which can be contacted at researchdata@springernature.com.

This service provides advice on research data policy compliance and on finding research data repositories. It is independent of journal, book and conference proceedings editorial offices and does not advise on specific manuscripts.

Helpdesk

CONTACT INFORMATION

If, after reviewing this document, you have any additional questions, please contact

Alicia Walters

Editorial coordinator

Pharmaceutical Research

E-mail: pharmres@rx.umaryland.edu

Ethical Responsibilities of Authors

This journal is committed to upholding the integrity of the scientific record. As a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) the journal will follow the COPE guidelines on how to deal with potential acts of misconduct.

Authors should refrain from misrepresenting research results which could damage the trust in the journal, the professionalism of scientific authorship, and ultimately the entire scientific endeavour. Maintaining integrity of the research and its presentation is helped by following the rules of good scientific practice, which include*:

  • The manuscript should not be submitted to more than one journal for simultaneous consideration.
  • The submitted work should be original and should not have been published elsewhere in any form or language (partially or in full), unless the new work concerns an expansion of previous work. (Please provide transparency on the re-use of material to avoid the concerns about text-recycling (‘self-plagiarism’).
  • A single study should not be split up into several parts to increase the quantity of submissions and submitted to various journals or to one journal over time (i.e. ‘salami-slicing/publishing’).
  • Concurrent or secondary publication is sometimes justifiable, provided certain conditions are met. Examples include: translations or a manuscript that is intended for a different group of readers.
  • Results should be presented clearly, honestly, and without fabrication, falsification or inappropriate data manipulation (including image based manipulation). Authors should adhere to discipline-specific rules for acquiring, selecting and processing data.
  • No data, text, or theories by others are presented as if they were the author’s own (‘plagiarism’). Proper acknowledgements to other works must be given (this includes material that is closely copied (near verbatim), summarized and/or paraphrased), quotation marks (to indicate words taken from another source) are used for verbatim copying of material, and permissions secured for material that is copyrighted.

Important note: the journal may use software to screen for plagiarism.

  • Authors should make sure they have permissions for the use of software, questionnaires/(web) surveys and scales in their studies (if appropriate).
  • Authors should avoid untrue statements about an entity (who can be an individual person or a company) or descriptions of their behavior or actions that could potentially be seen as personal attacks or allegations about that person.
  • Research that may be misapplied to pose a threat to public health or national security should be clearly identified in the manuscript (e.g. dual use of research). Examples include creation of harmful consequences of biological agents or toxins, disruption of immunity of vaccines, unusual hazards in the use of chemicals, weaponization of research/technology (amongst others).
  • Authors are strongly advised to ensure the author group, the Corresponding Author, and the order of authors are all correct at submission. Adding and/or deleting authors during the revision stages is generally not permitted, but in some cases may be warranted. Reasons for changes in authorship should be explained in detail. Please note that changes to authorship cannot be made after acceptance of a manuscript.

*All of the above are guidelines and authors need to make sure to respect third parties rights such as copyright and/or moral rights.

Upon request authors should be prepared to send relevant documentation or data in order to verify the validity of the results presented. This could be in the form of raw data, samples, records, etc. Sensitive information in the form of confidential or proprietary data is excluded.

If there is suspicion of misbehavior or alleged fraud the Journal and/or Publisher will carry out an investigation following COPE guidelines. If, after investigation, there are valid concerns, the author(s) concerned will be contacted under their given e-mail address and given an opportunity to address the issue. Depending on the situation, this may result in the Journal’s and/or Publisher’s implementation of the following measures, including, but not limited to:

  • If the manuscript is still under consideration, it may be rejected and returned to the author.
  • If the article has already been published online, depending on the nature and severity of the infraction:

    - an erratum/correction may be placed with the article

    - an expression of concern may be placed with the article

    - or in severe cases retraction of the article may occur.

The reason will be given in the published erratum/correction, expression of concern or retraction note. Please note that retraction means that the article is maintained on the platform, watermarked “retracted” and the explanation for the retraction is provided in a note linked to the watermarked article.

  • The author’s institution may be informed
  • A notice of suspected transgression of ethical standards in the peer review system may be included as part of the author’s and article’s bibliographic record.

Fundamental errors

Authors have an obligation to correct mistakes once they discover a significant error or inaccuracy in their published article. The author(s) is/are requested to contact the journal and explain in what sense the error is impacting the article. A decision on how to correct the literature will depend on the nature of the error. This may be a correction or retraction. The retraction note should provide transparency which parts of the article are impacted by the error.

Suggesting / excluding reviewers

Authors are welcome to suggest suitable reviewers and/or request the exclusion of certain individuals when they submit their manuscripts. When suggesting reviewers, authors should make sure they are totally independent and not connected to the work in any way. It is strongly recommended to suggest a mix of reviewers from different countries and different institutions. When suggesting reviewers, the Corresponding Author must provide an institutional email address for each suggested reviewer, or, if this is not possible to include other means of verifying the identity such as a link to a personal homepage, a link to the publication record or a researcher or author ID in the submission letter. Please note that the Journal may not use the suggestions, but suggestions are appreciated and may help facilitate the peer review process.

Authorship principles

These guidelines describe authorship principles and good authorship practices to which prospective authors should adhere to.

Authorship clarified

The Journal and Publisher assume all authors agreed with the content and that all gave explicit consent to submit and that they obtained consent from the responsible authorities at the institute/organization where the work has been carried out, before the work is submitted.

The Publisher does not prescribe the kinds of contributions that warrant authorship. It is recommended that authors adhere to the guidelines for authorship that are applicable in their specific research field. In absence of specific guidelines it is recommended to adhere to the following guidelines*:

All authors whose names appear on the submission

1) made substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data; or the creation of new software used in the work;

2) drafted the work or revised it critically for important intellectual content;

3) approved the version to be published; and

4) agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

* Based on/adapted from:

ICMJE, Defining the Role of Authors and Contributors,

Transparency in authors’ contributions and responsibilities to promote integrity in scientific publication, McNutt at all, PNAS February 27, 2018

Disclosures and declarations

All authors are requested to include information regarding sources of funding, financial or non-financial interests, study-specific approval by the appropriate ethics committee for research involving humans and/or animals, informed consent if the research involved human participants, and a statement on welfare of animals if the research involved animals (as appropriate).

The decision whether such information should be included is not only dependent on the scope of the journal, but also the scope of the article. Work submitted for publication may have implications for public health or general welfare and in those cases it is the responsibility of all authors to include the appropriate disclosures and declarations.

Data transparency

All authors are requested to make sure that all data and materials as well as software application or custom code support their published claims and comply with field standards. Please note that journals may have individual policies on (sharing) research data in concordance with disciplinary norms and expectations. Please check the Instructions for Authors of the Journal that you are submitting to for specific instructions.

Role of the Corresponding Author

One author is assigned as Corresponding Author and acts on behalf of all co-authors and ensures that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately addressed.

The Corresponding Author is responsible for the following requirements:

  • ensuring that all listed authors have approved the manuscript before submission, including the names and order of authors;
  • managing all communication between the Journal and all co-authors, before and after publication;*
  • providing transparency on re-use of material and mention any unpublished material (for example manuscripts in press) included in the manuscript in a cover letter to the Editor;
  • making sure disclosures, declarations and transparency on data statements from all authors are included in the manuscript as appropriate (see above).

* The requirement of managing all communication between the journal and all co-authors during submission and proofing may be delegated to a Contact or Submitting Author. In this case please make sure the Corresponding Author is clearly indicated in the manuscript.

Author contributions

Please check the Instructions for Authors of the Journal that you are submitting to for specific instructions regarding contribution statements.

In absence of specific instructions and in research fields where it is possible to describe discrete efforts, the Publisher recommends authors to include contribution statements in the work that specifies the contribution of every author in order to promote transparency. These contributions should be listed at the separate title page.

Examples of such statement(s) are shown below:

• Free text:

All authors contributed to the study conception and design. Material preparation, data collection and analysis were performed by [full name], [full name] and [full name]. The first draft of the manuscript was written by [full name] and all authors commented on previous versions of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Example: CRediT taxonomy:

• Conceptualization: [full name], …; Methodology: [full name], …; Formal analysis and investigation: [full name], …; Writing - original draft preparation: [full name, …]; Writing - review and editing: [full name], …; Funding acquisition: [full name], …; Resources: [full name], …; Supervision: [full name],….

For review articles where discrete statements are less applicable a statement should be included who had the idea for the article, who performed the literature search and data analysis, and who drafted and/or critically revised the work.

For articles that are based primarily on the student’s dissertation or thesis, it is recommended that the student is usually listed as principal author:

A Graduate Student’s Guide to Determining Authorship Credit and Authorship Order, APA Science Student Council 2006

Affiliation

The primary affiliation for each author should be the institution where the majority of their work was done. If an author has subsequently moved, the current address may additionally be stated. Addresses will not be updated or changed after publication of the article.

Changes to authorship

Authors are strongly advised to ensure the correct author group, the Corresponding Author, and the order of authors at submission. Changes of authorship by adding or deleting authors, and/or changes in Corresponding Author, and/or changes in the sequence of authors are not accepted after acceptance of a manuscript.

  • Please note that author names will be published exactly as they appear on the accepted submission!

Please make sure that the names of all authors are present and correctly spelled, and that addresses and affiliations are current.

Adding and/or deleting authors at revision stage are generally not permitted, but in some cases it may be warranted. Reasons for these changes in authorship should be explained. Approval of the change during revision is at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief. Please note that journals may have individual policies on adding and/or deleting authors during revision stage.

Author identification

Authors are recommended to use their ORCID ID when submitting an article for consideration or acquire an ORCID ID via the submission process.

Deceased or incapacitated authors

For cases in which a co-author dies or is incapacitated during the writing, submission, or peer-review process, and the co-authors feel it is appropriate to include the author, co-authors should obtain approval from a (legal) representative which could be a direct relative.

Authorship issues or disputes

In the case of an authorship dispute during peer review or after acceptance and publication, the Journal will not be in a position to investigate or adjudicate. Authors will be asked to resolve the dispute themselves. If they are unable the Journal reserves the right to withdraw a manuscript from the editorial process or in case of a published paper raise the issue with the authors’ institution(s) and abide by its guidelines.

Confidentiality

Authors should treat all communication with the Journal as confidential which includes correspondence with direct representatives from the Journal such as Editors-in-Chief and/or Handling Editors and reviewers’ reports unless explicit consent has been received to share information.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

To ensure objectivity and transparency in research and to ensure that accepted principles of ethical and professional conduct have been followed, authors should include information regarding sources of funding, potential conflicts of interest (financial or non-financial), informed consent if the research involved human participants, and a statement on welfare of animals if the research involved animals.

Authors should include the following statements (if applicable) in a separate section entitled “Compliance with Ethical Standards” when submitting a paper:

  • Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest
  • Research involving Human Participants and/or Animals
  • Informed consent

Please note that standards could vary slightly per journal dependent on their peer review policies (i.e. single or double blind peer review) as well as per journal subject discipline. Before submitting your article check the instructions following this section carefully.

The corresponding author should be prepared to collect documentation of compliance with ethical standards and send if requested during peer review or after publication.

The Editors reserve the right to reject manuscripts that do not comply with the above-mentioned guidelines. The author will be held responsible for false statements or failure to fulfill the above-mentioned guidelines.

Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest

Authors must disclose all relationships or interests that could have direct or potential influence or impart bias on the work. Although an author may not feel there is any conflict, disclosure of relationships and interests provides a more complete and transparent process, leading to an accurate and objective assessment of the work. Awareness of a real or perceived conflicts of interest is a perspective to which the readers are entitled. This is not meant to imply that a financial relationship with an organization that sponsored the research or compensation received for consultancy work is inappropriate. Examples of potential conflicts of interests that are directly or indirectly related to the research may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Research grants from funding agencies (please give the research funder and the grant number)
  • Honoraria for speaking at symposia
  • Financial support for attending symposia
  • Financial support for educational programs
  • Employment or consultation
  • Support from a project sponsor
  • Position on advisory board or board of directors or other type of management relationships
  • Multiple affiliations
  • Financial relationships, for example equity ownership or investment interest
  • Intellectual property rights (e.g. patents, copyrights and royalties from such rights)
  • Holdings of spouse and/or children that may have financial interest in the work

In addition, interests that go beyond financial interests and compensation (non-financial interests) that may be important to readers should be disclosed. These may include but are not limited to personal relationships or competing interests directly or indirectly tied to this research, or professional interests or personal beliefs that may influence your research.

The corresponding author collects the conflict of interest disclosure forms from all authors. In author collaborations where formal agreements for representation allow it, it is sufficient for the corresponding author to sign the disclosure form on behalf of all authors. Examples of forms can be found

here:

The corresponding author will include a summary statement in the text of the manuscript in a separate section before the reference list, that reflects what is recorded in the potential conflict of interest disclosure form(s).

See below examples of disclosures:

Funding: This study was funded by X (grant number X).

Conflict of Interest: Author A has received research grants from Company A. Author B has received a speaker honorarium from Company X and owns stock in Company Y. Author C is a member of committee Z.

If no conflict exists, the authors should state:

Conflict of Interest: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Research involving human participants and/or animals

1) Statement of human rights

When reporting studies that involve human participants, authors should include a statement that the studies have been approved by the appropriate institutional and/or national research ethics committee and have been performed in accordance with the ethical standards as laid down in the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

If doubt exists whether the research was conducted in accordance with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration or comparable standards, the authors must explain the reasons for their approach, and demonstrate that the independent ethics committee or institutional review board explicitly approved the doubtful aspects of the study.

If a study was granted exemption from requiring ethics approval, this should also be detailed in the manuscript (including the name of the ethics committee that granted the exemption and the reasons for the exemption).

Authors must - in all situations as described above - include the name of the ethics committee and the reference number where appropriate.

The following statements should be included in the text before the References section:

Ethical approval: “All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee (include name of committee + reference number) and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.”

Ethical approval retrospective studies

Although retrospective studies are conducted on already available data or biological material (for which formal consent may not be needed or is difficult to obtain) ethical approval may be required dependent on the law and the national ethical guidelines of a country. Authors should check with their institution to make sure they are complying with the specific requirements of their country.

2) Statement on the welfare of animals

The welfare of animals used for research must be respected. When reporting experiments on animals, authors should indicate whether the international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals have been followed, and that the studies have been approved by a research ethics committee at the institution or practice at which the studies were conducted (where such a committee exists). Please provide the name of ethics committee and relevant permit number.

For studies with animals, the following statement should be included in the text before the References section:

Ethical approval: “All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.”

If applicable (where such a committee exists): “All procedures performed in studies involving animals were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institution or practice at which the studies were conducted.(include name of committee + permit number)”

If articles do not contain studies with human participants or animals by any of the authors, please select one of the following statements:

“This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.”

“This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.”

“This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.”

All individuals have individual rights that are not to be infringed. Individual participants in studies have, for example, the right to decide what happens to the (identifiable) personal data gathered, to what they have said during a study or an interview, as well as to any photograph that was taken. This is especially true concerning images of vulnerable people (e.g. minors, patients, refugees, etc) or the use of images in sensitive contexts. In many instances authors will need to secure written consent before including images. Identifying details (names, dates of birth, identity numbers and other information) of the participants that were studied should not be published in written descriptions, photographs, and genetic profiles unless the information is essential for scholarly purposes and the participant (or parent or guardian if the participant is incapable) gave written informed consent for publication. Complete anonymity is difficult to achieve in some cases. Detailed descriptions of individual participants, whether of their whole bodies or of body sections, may lead to disclosure of their identity. Under certain circumstances consent is not required as long as information is anonymized and the submission does not include images that may identify the person.

Informed consent for publication should be obtained if there is any doubt. For example, masking the eye region in photographs of participants is inadequate protection of anonymity. If identifying characteristics are altered to protect anonymity, such as in genetic profiles, authors should provide assurance that alterations do not distort scientific meaning.

Exceptions where it is not necessary to obtain consent:

• Images such as x rays, laparoscopic images, ultrasound images, brain scans, pathology slides unless there is a concern about identifying information in which case, authors should ensure that consent is obtained.

• Reuse of images: If images are being reused from prior publications, the Publisher will assume that the prior publication obtained the relevant information regarding consent. Authors should provide the appropriate attribution for republished images.

Consent and already available data and/or biologic material

Regardless of whether material is collected from living or dead patients, they (family or guardian if the deceased has not made a pre-mortem decision) must have given prior written consent. The aspect of confidentiality as well as any wishes from the deceased should be respected.

Data protection, confidentiality and privacy

When biological material is donated for or data is generated as part of a research project authors should ensure, as part of the informed consent procedure, that the participants are made what kind of (personal) data will be processed, how it will be used and for what purpose. In case of data acquired via a biobank/biorepository, it is possible they apply a broad consent which allows research participants to consent to a broad range of uses of their data and samples which is regarded by research ethics committees as specific enough to be considered “informed”. However, authors should always check the specific biobank/biorepository policies or any other type of data provider policies (in case of non-bio research) to be sure that this is the case.

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