Emerging Scholar Best Article Award

The editors of the Journal of Youth and Adolescence New Content Itemhave named Adam A. Rogers as the 2019 recipient of its Emerging Scholar Best Article Award for his article entitled “Adolescents’ daily romantic experiences and negative mood: A dyadic, intensive longitudinal study”. Dr. Rogers is an assistant professor at Brigham Young University, in its School of Family Life. His research focuses on family dynamics that contribute to adolescents’ development of competence and psychopathology, with a particular lens toward gender socialization. His co-authors were all from Arizona State University. They included Thao Ha, who is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University, Kimberly A. Updegraff, who is a Cowden Distinguished Professor of in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University, and Masumi Iida, who is an Assistant Professor in the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. The award includes a $500 honorarium acknowledging the emerging scholar’s unique contribution to research on adolescence.

Dr. Rogers’ study examined how adolescents’ romantic relationships present unique developmental challenges that can portend psychological difficulties. He was particularly interested in the degree to which daily romantic transactions potentiate fluctuations in negative mood. The study examined associations between adolescents’ daily romantic relationship experiences and their same-day negative affective states. Using a dyadic ecological momentary assessment (EMA) design, he and his colleagues followed an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 98 adolescent romantic couples twice weekly for 12 weeks. Their study indicated that various daily romantic experiences (e.g., conflict, feelings about the relationship) predicted greater same-day negative affect. Importantly, they also found that, beyond the effects of these romantic experiences, adolescent couples were synchronized in their fluctuating negative affective states, which evidenced emotional contagion. Their findings begin to pinpoint how romantic relationships influence adolescents’ everyday lives and emotional development.

The journal’s editors view receiving the award as a considerably distinctive accomplishment. The journal publishes 12 issues per year, each typically containing about 16 manuscripts. In addition, it is notable that, every year, fewer and fewer first authors are emerging scholars. Although fewer emerging scholars qualify to be considered, this shift in authorship has not reduced the competitiveness of the award. In fact, these developments actually make the process even more competitive for emerging scholars, as they have increased competition to get published in the first place.

The Journal of Youth and Adolescence provides a single, high-level medium of communication for psychologists, psychiatrists, biologists, criminologists, educators, and professionals in many other allied disciplines who address the subject of youth and adolescence.

Read the winning article, Adolescents’ daily romantic experiences and negative mood: A dyadic, intensive longitudinal study.