Meet the Editors

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Koen Martens
Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Brussels, Belgium

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Koen Martens is Head of Research of the Royal Belgian Institute of natural Sciences (Brussels, Belgium), guest professor at the University of Ghent (Belgium) and invited professor at the University of Maringa (Brazil). His research interests are in aquatic ecology and evolutionary biology, especially in the field of speciation in ancient lakes and the evolution of asexual reproduction, and in the taxonomy and ecology of non-marine Ostracoda (Crustacea). Koen is author of c 200 ISI rated papers and of more than 500 additional titles. He is author or (co-) editor of 18 books. Koen has been (co-) PI of about 50 national and international projects, including several large EU projects. Koen has been Editor in Chief of Hydrobiologia since 2003.

ASSOCIATE EDITORS-IN-CHIEF

Diego Fontaneto
ISE-CNR, Verbania Pallanza, Italy

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Diego Fontaneto is a zoologist and an ecologist interested in biological diversity in general, and in particular in how bdelloid rotifers can survive, persist and diversify in theapparent absence of sexual recombination. Given the ubiquity of bdelloids in any habitat, from freshwater to marine, to their unusual ecological characteristics of desiccation resistance, and to their ‘scandalous’ evolutionary features of being considered ancient asexuals, his work is often at the boundary between ecology and evolution. In 2012 he joined the editorial board of Hydrobiologia and was exposed to an even wider diversity of approaches and ideas through the manuscripts that he has handled since then.

Luigi Naselli-Flores
University of Palermo, Italy

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Luigi Naselli-Flores is a hydrobiologist, mainly interested in freshwater phytoplankton and its taxonomic and ecological classification systems. He is also intrigued by the effects of environmental constraints on size and shape of planktic algae and, more recently, by the mechanisms allowing microorganisms to disperse across different freshwater ecosystems. He is a Professor of Plant Ecology at the University of Palermo since 2007; in the same year he was asked to join the Hydrobiologia editorial team as Associate Editor. Since then, his ‘‘scientific horizons’’ had to widen in order to deal with the huge diversity of manuscripts submitted to the journal. In 2013, he started serving as Associate Editor in Chief.

Sidinei Magela Thomaz
Universidade Estadual de Maringá - Nupélia, Brazil

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Dr. Sidinei M. Thomaz is Associate Professor in Ecology at the State University of Maringá, Brazil. He uses aquatic macrophytes and related organisms (including aquatic invertebrates and vertebrates) to test ecological concepts about invasion biology and biodiversity. His research is developed mainly in the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil), in reservoirs and in green-houses. He has currently several active scientific collaborations with universities in China, Argentina, France, UK and Belgium. He is Associate Editor-in-Chief of Hydrobiologia and Associate Editor of Biological Invasions, NeoBiota and Perspectives in Ecology and Conservation. He has supervised over 70 undergrad, MSc. and PhD students.

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

Stefano Amalfitano
Italian National Research Council | CNR · Institute of Water Research IRSA

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Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. I carry on researches in the field of Aquatic Microbial Ecology, with a focus on the structural and functional dynamics of microbial communities across environmental gradients in natural and engineered systems. These studies find fundamental applications for the management of water resources.

Iacopo Bertocci
Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli, Italy

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Dr. Iacopo Bertocci got a degree in Biological Science in 1999 and a PhD in Marine Ecology in 2003, both at the University of Pisa. Between 2003 and 2007, he was a post-doc researcher at the same university. Between 2009 and 2016, he was a researcher at CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental in Porto (Portugal). Between 2016 and 2018, he was a researcher at Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn of Naples Italy) in the field “Experimental design, biostatistics and data analysis”. Since the 28th December 2018, he is back to the University of Pisa, Dept. of Biology, with a tenure-track position as senior researcher. His main interest is in the assessment of the effects of natural and anthropogenic perturbations on coastal systems. His research activity is built on a strong basis in experimental design and statistical analysis of data aimed at testing hypotheses on patterns of distribution of assemblages and on how they are modulated by spatial and temporal changes of anthropogenic disturbance. His recent studies focus on benthic assemblages from intertidal and subtidal temperate environments and on their changes due to human harvesting, coastal urbanization and environmental variables directly and/or indirectly associated with climate change. These include, for instance, the mechanical disturbance associated with extreme storms, nutrient inputs and warming the single or combined effects of which are often examined as a function of variations in mean intensity and temporal variance. Such activities are developed in the context of some of the current main themes of global ecological research, including the study of responses of marine systems to global change, the understanding of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, the analysis of the impact of invasive species and the evaluation of the effectiveness of marine protected areas. In 2016, he has received the National Scientific Qualification as Associate Professor of Ecology. Until March 2019, he has published 62 ISI papers and has supervised 2 PhD theses and 15 Master theses.

Luis Mauricio Bini
Universidade Federal de Goias, Brazil

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Luis Mauricio Bini received his Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD degrees, respectively, in Ecology (São Paulo State University, 1991), Environmental Engineering (São Paulo University, 1995) and Ecology of Continental Aquatic Environments (State University of Maringá, 2001). He works at the Federal University of Goiás (since 1997), with a current interest in metacommunity ecology and research synthesis. His research on these topics is based on different aquatic systems (from tropical floodplain lakes and reservoirs to boreal streams) and on different organism groups (from diatoms to fishes).

Dani Boix
Institute of Aquatic Ecology & Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Girona, Spain

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Dr. Dani Boix is Associate Professor of the Ecology Unit in the Department of Environmental Science and researcher of the Institute of Aquatic Ecology. He is working as university teacher and researcher from 1992 in the same university. He has supervised 6 Master’s theses and 5 PhD theses. He has over 75 papers in peer review journals with a current H-index=26 and ResearchGate-score=35.71. The main topics of his research are: (1) the study of the structure of aquatic communities and their trophic relationships. It includes the analysis of species composition using other non taxonomic but functional approaches, such as the size of the individuals, their feeding habits or their life-history strategies; (2) the influence of environmental factors (hydrological, physical, chemical and biological) and their variability on the ecological functioning of Mediterranean aquatic ecosystems; (3) the dynamics and structure of metacommunities of different biotic groups according to their biological traits; (4) the use of the knowledge on the ecology of Mediterranean shallow waters in applied projects on wetland restauration (e.g., he was involved in the research team of 7 European Life projects). His research was mainly performed in freshwater and brackish wetlands, especially in temporary ponds and coastal salt marshes.

Nick Bond
The Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Nathan, Australia

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Professor Nick Bond is Director of the Centre for Freshwater Ecosystems at La Trobe University, Australia. He applies quantitative statistical and processes modelling approaches to study the effects of flow variability on stream biota (especially fish and macroinvertebrates) and ecosystem processes, with a strong focus on applied issues, such as water resources and habitat restoration. He earned a BSc(hons) and PhD from the University of Melbourne, and prior to joining La Trobe University he worked at the Australian Rivers Institute at Griffith University, where he remains an adjunct.

J. Checo Colón-Gaud
Georgia Southern University, Department of Biology, Statesboro, GA, USA

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Research in my lab focuses on the ecology of freshwater ecosystems. Most of my recent and ongoing work has focused on tropical headwater streams in Puerto Rico and Panama. Additionally, my students and I are involved in research efforts to explore the ecology of coastal plain streams, rivers and wetlands in southeastern Georgia. Major themes in my projects and those of my students include the effects aquatic consumers (invertebrates, fish, amphibians) in organic matter dynamics, nutrient cycling, and energy flow in streams and other freshwater habitats.

Jörg Dutz
Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Rostock, Germany

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Jörg Dutz obtained his Master degree in Hydrobiology and Fisheries Research from the University of Hamburg (Germany) in 1993. He did his doctoral studies at the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research (Bremen, Germany) and received his PhD from the University of Bremen in 1999. Between 1999 and 2006, he has worked as postdoctoral fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and the Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research. Following a Marie-Curie fellowship at the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, he held the position as senior scientist at the Danish Technical University in 2009-2014. Since then, he is a senior researcher at the Leibniz-Institute for Baltic Sea Research. His research focuses on ecological problems related to pelagic food web interactions and potential effects of climate variability and the long –term change in the dynamics of marine zooplankton populations.

Andrew R. Dzialowski
Oklahoma State University, Department of Integrative Biology, Stillwater, OK, USA

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Research in my lab explores how biotic interactions, resource availability, and anthropogenic disturbances interact to influence the structure and function of aquatic ecosystems. My students and I combine laboratory, observational, and experimental studies to address several major themes: Metacommunity dynamics; Ecology of invasive species; Zooplankton community structure; Ecology and management of cyanobacterial blooms; Applied water quality and reservoir management; Wetland ecology and management.

Alex Elliott
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, UK

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Dr Alex Elliott is a lake ecologist with expertise in modelling and has been employed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH, UK) since 2000, publishing over 60 peer-reviewed papers. He has worked with the lake phytoplankton community model, PROTECH, for over twenty years, developing and testing it around the world. His research has focused on predicting the impact of climate change on lakes and the compounding influence of eutrophication. The focus of many of these studies has been to examine the impact on the functional ecology of the phytoplankton community and particularly the cyanobacteria species that can so adversely affect water quality. Recently, he has been examining the impact of drought on lakes and reservoirs.

Cécile Fauvelot
IRD, UMR ENTROPIE, Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France

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Cécile Fauvelot research activities focus on evolutionary biology, molecular ecology, marine ecology, population genetics and conservation biology. She completed her PhD in 2002 France, working on coral reef fishes from French Polynesia, investigating gene flow - life history trait correlations in coral reef fishes. After her PhD, she explored the impact of population size variations in modifying species genetic diversity and geographic structuring through time on various organisms, from Indonesian butterflies to red coral and other invertebrates from the Mediterranean Sea. Since 2007, she works at the Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD) where her research activities mainly focus on coral reef organisms populations connectivity, using population genetics to answer ecological questions regarding how reef populations are linked by larval dispersal. Her current model organisms are various (coral reef fishes, pelagic fishes, giant clams, corals, sea cucumbers), from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea, but her main question remains the same: what can their DNA tells us?

Verónica Ferreira
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, University of Coimbra, Portugal

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Verónica Ferreira holds a PhD in Biology (specialization: stream ecology) from the University of Coimbra, for which she studied the effects of fertilization and forest change on stream invertebrate communities and organic matter decomposition. Between 2007 and 2015, she carried out post-doctoral research at IMAR – Institute of Marine Research (University of Coimbra, Portugal), EcoLab (CNRS, France) and School of Biological Sciences (Royal Holloway University of London, UK) to evaluate the effects of global change factors (e.g. fertilization, warming, forest change, increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration) on aquatic communities and processes and to perform systematic reviews by means of meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of anthropogenic activities on organic matter decomposition. She has also studied the effects of environmental change on streams in tropical settings (central Brazil) and oceanic islands (Azores Archipelago). Since 2015, she is an auxiliary researcher at MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, University of Coimbra. She has authored more than 50 papers in international scientific journals and participated in 11 research projects, including 4 large scale international networks. Over recent years, she has also devoted substantial time to science communication activities.

Gideon Gal
Kinneret Limnological Laboratory, Israel Oceanographic & Limnological Research, Migdal, Israel

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Dr. Gideon Gal is the director of the Kinneret Limnological Laboratory, Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research. He is an aquatic ecologist by training with a background in zooplankton research. His main research focus is ecosystem modeling of lakes and marine systems. He is particularly interested in food-web interactions and the impact of abiotic stressors on food web processes. He uses the models as a management tool and a as a means for providing insight into the possible outcomes of anthropogenic stressors on the ecosystem.

Stuart Halse
Bennelongia Pty Ltd, Wembley, Australia

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Stuart Halse did his undergraduate degree in zoology at the University of Western Australia and then did a PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg on the ecophysiology of feeding and breeding by Spur-winged Geese. He subsequently worked on feeding behaviour of larks in Iraq, worked briefly at the University of Tasmania and then spent more than 20 years in Western Australia’s Parks and Wildlife agency before setting up the environmental consulting company. Bennelongia, where he now works. In Parks and Wildlife, Stuart worked mostly on inventory of aquatic invertebrates and waterbirds and management issues associated with wetlands, including being part of the teams that developed AusRivAS for river health assessment in Australia and undertook the first Australia-wide waterbird survey. Stuart also set up a long-term monitoring program to quantify the effects of salinization on wetlands and undertook various studies to document the importance of arid zone wetlands for aquatic invertebrates. Around 2000, Stuart began working on stygofauna which, together with troglofauna, comprise much of the consulting work done by Bennelongia, Stuart’s main interests currently are the factors affecting occurrence of subterranean fauna, waterbirds and aquatic invertebrates. Stuart is also interested in the taxonomy of Australian ostracods.

David Hamilton
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

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David Hamilton is the Deputy Director in the Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. He has previously held an academic position in New Zealand where he was the Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chair in Lake Restoration at the University of Waikato. His research interests are in lake water quality modelling, cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms and real-time sensors for measuring variables in lakes. He has general interests in lake restoration and has worked closely with management authorities and stakeholders in applications of research to assist their lake management programmes. Hamilton has also developed and applied lake models widely and used these to inform on ice cover, impending algal blooms and nutrient dynamics. He also has interests in coupled catchment-lake models to better understand impacts of land use on lake water quality.

Ingeborg Palm Helland
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Trondheim, Norway

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Ingeborg Palm Helland is a Research Director at NINA and her key qualifications are: Ecological effects of hydropower, Ecology of freshwater fish, Competitive interactions, Climate change, Winter ecology, Ecological mechanisms of speciation, Ecological modelling, EU Water Framework Directive, Sea lice

David J. Hoeinghaus
Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, USA

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David Hoeinghaus received his PhD from Texas A& M University in 2006, and is currently an Associate Professor in Biological Sciences at the University of North Texas and the Advanced Environmental Research Institute. He also leads the Stable Isotope Ecology Laboratory core facility at UNT. His fish-centric research interests range across population, community and ecosystem scales, often employing a functional traits and food web perspective. Dynamics and connectivity of fluvial systems and anthropogenic impacts are central themes to his research, and he is particularly interested in river-floodplain ecosystems of the Neotropics.

Christopher Joyce
Centre for Aquatic Environments, School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, UK

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Chris Joyce is Professor of Ecology and Director of the Centre for Aquatic Environments at the University of Brighton. Professor Joyce has over 25 years of ecological research experience focusing on wetland ecology, management and restoration. More specifically, his research aims to improve understanding and management of internationally important transitional wetlands, especially wet grasslands, coastal wetlands, and river floodplains, and develop control and monitoring of invasive non-native aquatic plants. He has conducted his research throughout Europe, especially in the UK, Czech Republic and Estonia, and the USA. Professor Joyce has attracted large grants for his research from the European Union, Darwin Initiative, Earthwatch Institute and Research Councils, amongst others. He has authored over 70 peer-reviewed and conference papers and has co-authored two books. He has presented his work to academics, practitioners, politicians and the general public and been invited to give keynote lectures throughout Europe and in the USA. He is active within the Society of Wetland Scientists, serving on their Publications Committee.Professor Joyce has successfully supervised numerous PhD students, and teaches Masters students and undergraduates in a range of environmental topics, including biodiversity, biogeography, data analysis, landscape ecology, environmental impact assessment, and wetlands. He particularly enjoys field-based teaching and research.

Lee B. Kats
Pepperdine University, Malibu, USA

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Dr. Lee Kats received his B.A. from Calvin College in Michigan and the Ph.D. in biology from the University of Kentucky. From 2001 until 2011 he served as Associate Dean for Research at Pepperdine University and since 2011 he has served as Vice Provost for Research and Strategic Initiatives. He began teaching at Pepperdine in 1990.

In 2000, Dr. Kats was named as the Frank R. Seaver Chair in Natural Science at Pepperdine University. He conducts research in the areas of animal ecology, tropical ecology and conservation biology. For over 25 years he and his students have studied the conservation biology of local amphibians. He and his students focus on stream ecology, impacts of invasive species and predator-prey ecology and behavior. He also conducts research and teaches in Costa Rica and Argentina. As Vice Provost, Dr. Kats works closely with Pepperdine’s information technology department, office of institutional effectiveness and assessment, and research and sponsored programs. Dr. Kats is also involved in the university’s strategic planning process and implementation.

Jonne Kotta
University of Tartu, Estonia

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Jonne Kotta works at the Estonian Marine Institute, the University of Tartu as a research professor in Marine Ecology. He also acts as a Vice Director in the same institute. J. Kotta has over 25 years’ experience as a field and an experimental ecologist. He has a broad expertise in a number of fields of marine science (pattern, process studies, dynamics and modelling) and strong knowledge in different types of habitats (benthic and pelagic) and organisms (phytoplankton, zooplankton, phytobenthos, zoobenthos and fish). He is conducting research, among other topics, on trophic networks, benthic-pelagic coupling and scale-dependent relationships between environmental forcing and biotic patterns. He has also strong theoretical and practical knowledge of different types of (spatial) modelling techniques to link theoretical science with different management practices. Such knowledge is needed for the current management plans but likely to produce clearer vision and strategies for the future.

Katya Kovalenko
U.S. Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA, USA

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"I enjoy working and handling papers in diverse areas of freshwater community and ecosystem ecology particularly food webs, invasive species, functional traits, habitat complexity, and the interface of ecology and data science."

Ken W. Krauss
U.S. Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, Lafayette, LA, USA

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Dr. Krauss is a Research Physiological Ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, Wetland and Aquatic Research Center in Lafayette, Louisiana, USA. He investigates greenhouse gas emissions, ecosystem carbon balances, and sea-level rise vulnerability of coastal wetland communities under a variety of management treatments using different techniques. Dr. Krauss measures CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes using chambers and, more recently, eddy covariance techniques, and when possible pair these measurements from soils and vegetation with sap flow studies to understand interactively and independently the role of trees and other types of vegetation in mediating greenhouse gas and water fluxes. He typically works in marshes, tidally influenced freshwater forested wetlands, and mangroves both in the U.S. and internationally (especially, Micronesia, China, & New Caledonia). He also focus strongly on eco-physiological scaling of water fluxes using different approaches in forested wetlands, and he has many active collaborations globally using surface elevation tables (SETs) to determine if and how wetlands are responding to rising seas.

Eric R. Larson
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, NRES, Urbana, IL, USA

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I am an ecologist and conservation scientist with a focus on freshwater species, communities, and ecosystems. I am particularly interested in preventing and managing species invasions, anticipating and adapting to the consequences of climate change, and understanding how habitat structure and land use change affects ecological processes. I also work with practitioners to evaluate conservation effectiveness from both economic and ecological perspectives.

Manuel Lopes-Lima
CIBIO/InBIO, Research Center in Biodiversity and Generic Resources, University of Porto, Portugal

Mariana Meerhoff
Professor at the Ecology and Environmental Management Department of Universidad de la República, Uruguay

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Her research focuses particularly on the potential effects of climate warming and land use changes on trophic dynamics and ecosystem processes, in shallow lakes, wade-able streams and man-made reservoirs. Her work involves laboratory and field experiments, field studies and space for time substitution studies conducted under different climates. She has published around 60 papers and several book chapters and edited books.

John M. Melack
University of California, Santa Barbara, USA

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John M. Melack is a Professor in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management and Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Melack's research has emphasized ecological processes in lakes, wetlands and streams, and hydrological and biogeochemical aspects of catchments. He has conducted multi-year studies of freshwater and saline lakes in eastern Africa and floodplains in the Amazon and Pantanal of South America. In California, his studies of the saline Mono Lake and high-elevation lakes in the Sierra Nevada have continued for over 30 years, and he is involved in the second decade of an LTER examining linkages among coastal watersheds, near-shore kelp ecosystems and offshore waters in Santa Barbara Channel. He has applied active and passive microwave and optical remote sensing to studies of lakes and tropical wetlands.

Juan-Carlos Molinero
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR), Kiel, Germany

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Marcelo S. Moretti
Department of Ecology, University Vila Velha, Vila Velha, Brazil

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Dr. Marcelo S. Moretti holds a Bachelor's degree in Biological Sciences from the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (2002), a Master's degree (2005) and a PhD (2009) in Ecology from the Graduate Program in Ecology, Conservation and Management of Wildlife at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. He has experience in the area of Limnology, with emphasis on Ecology of Benthic Invertebrates and Processing of Organic Matter in Streams, working mainly on the following subjects: benthic macroinvertebrate communities, leaf litter decomposition, behavior of invertebrate shredders, and bioindicators of water quality. He is currently a professor at Universidade Vila Velha, where he leads the Laboratory of Aquatic Insect Ecology and is the Head of the Graduate Program in Ecology of Ecosystems.

Ivan Nagelkerken
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Australia

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Ivan Nagelkerken is a professor in marine ecology at The University of Adelaide in Australia. He works in temperate as well as tropical coastal ecosystems (mangroves, seagrasses, kelp forests, rocky reefs, coral reefs, estuaries), with a special focus on fishes. His main focus has been on how ecosystem connectivity affects the functioning and resilience of coastal marine ecosystems. Most of this work was performed in the Caribbean, Eastern Africa, and Australia. In the last 6 years he has additionally focussed on studying the effects of global change (e.g. ocean warming and acidification) on the diversity, abundance, and distribution of fish species, and the cascading effects on marine ecosystems. This research provides an understanding of how climate change stressors will affect the behaviour and physiology of fish species, how this could modify population dynamics and species community structuring, and what the implications are for the biodiversity, functioning, and resilience of marine ecosystems in the near future. Most of this work has been performed in Australia and New Zealand. Prof. Nagelkerken has co-authored >150 scientific papers and book chapters and edited a book on ecosystem connectivity. He has a Google scholar h-index of 55 with > 10,000 citations to his work.

André Andrian Padial
Federal University of Parana, Botany Department, Curitiba, Brazil

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Andre A. Padial is a full professor at Universidade Federal do Paraná – Brazil since 2011, working mainly with aquatic ecology, invasion biology and aquatic plants. In summary, his current work focus mainly in the understanding impacts of anthropogenic actions and neobiota in aquatic metacommunity assembly considering taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic dimensions. He has graduated in Biological Sciences in 2005, finished has a Masters in Aquatic Ecology in 2007, and completed a PhD in a program on Ecology and Evolution in 2010, with a thesis on community assembly of multiple aquatic biological groups. He has published more than 50 papers in peer-review journals in about 10 years of professional experience. He is also a fellow of Brazilian Council for Scientific Development and is currently head of one of the top Post-graduate program in Ecology in Brazil.

Judit Padisák
Department of Limnology, Institute of Environmental Science, University of Pannonia, Hungary

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Judit Padisák serves as Professor of Limnology at the Department of Limnology, Institute of Environmental Science University of Pannonia, Hungary. She graduated as biologist and got her PhD in the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary. Judit's research focuses on population- and community ecology of (especially) freshwater phytoplankton in context of habitat heterogeneity; biogeochemical processes in lakes; functional diversity and dispersal ecology. Her primary research experience was gained on temperate lakes and were extended later to phytoplankton behavior in lakes and reservoirs from the tropics to cold temperate regions.She has cooperated with a wide number of researchers worldwide on various research projects (e.g. FP7-Phytoplankton-on-line, FP7-CLIME, Interreg-EULAKES, Tempus-Quali). Judit serves as editor or editorial board member of for several top-ranked international journals field of phytoplankton research and was an elected vice president of the International Society of Limnology (SIL). Her ex-PhD students are acknowledged members of the international scientific community. She is a member of the Academia Europaea.

Fernando Mayer Pelicice
Environmental Research Nucleus, Federal University of Tocantins, Brazil

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Fernando Mayer Pelicice graduated in Biological Sciences, and received his PhD on Ecology of Inland Ecosystems at the State University of Maringá (Brazil). Currently is professor and researcher at the Federal University of Tocantins (Brazil). Fernando is an expert in aquatic ecology and conservation, with focus on Neotropical freshwater fishes. His research interests include fish ecology and diversity, biological invasions and impacts from human activities. A main research line is the investigation of river regulation and hydropower development. He has supervised Master and PhD students in different universities, and collaborated with several researchers from Brazil and other countries. Fernando has published nearly a hundred of articles, books and chapters. He also serves as Section Editor for Neotropical Ichthyology.

Michael Power
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, ON, Canada

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Dr. Power is a research biologist in the Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, with a specialization in northern salmonid ecology, population dynamics and stable isotope research. His research has focussed on understanding the effects of climate-related variability on iconic fish species, such as Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus, Linneaus) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, Linnaeus), and on climate-related analyses of estuarine and freshwater fishes generally. His work aims specifically at melding modern analytical methods (e.g. stable isotopes) with long-term biological monitoring records to better infer likely population-level responses to climate change. Other research interests have focussed on the determining the ecological effects of water abstraction, hydro dams and the determination of ecological flow assessment techniques for flow regulation. Dr. Power has an established record of publication success (> 220 peer reviewed papers) dealing with all aspects of salmonid ecology (movement, reproduction, population dynamics and zoogeographic patterns) and has authored several key chapters on population bioassessment methods for American Fisheries Society technical publications. He has been PI or co-PI for several multi-year, multi-million dollar projects in northern Canada ( e.g., International Polar Year) and collaborates regularly on fisheries and foodweb studies in Scandinavia and elsewhere.

Maria del Mar Sánchez Montoya
Department of Ecology and Hydrology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, Spain

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Maria Begoña Santos Vázquez
Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo, Vigo, Spain

Prof. Santos started her scientific career at the University of Aberdeen (UK) before moving to the IEO. Her research areas include the ecology, biology and habitat modelling of marine mammals including estimating population abundance, quantifying interactions with fisheries and the development of indicators and monitoring programs in relation to the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. She was Head of Fisheries at the IEO during 2014-2017,coordinatingresearch and provision of advice on management and conservation measures for living marine resources of interest for the Spanish fleet. She is currently seconded (for 1 year) to the European Fisheries Control Agency, where she works in risk analysis. She has participated in more than 27 international projects and is the lead researcher of the IEO Marine Mammals and Ecosystem research lines. She has published 108 articles in JCR journals and 9 book chapters and has co-supervised 8 PhD theses. She is Spanish Delegate (and Head of Delegation) at the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission, Spanish expert on marine mammals for the OSPAR - COBAM group and was the Spanish delegate in the Scientific Committee of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) during 2013-2018.

Jasmine Saros
School of Biology & Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, USA

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My main research interests involve paleolimnology and phytoplankton ecology, as I use diatom fossil records in lake sediments to reconstruct environmental change over time. My approach differs from conventional reconstructions involving diatom profiles in that I apply information from both field observations and bioassays to the sediment records, and I use patterns in the sediment record to pose testable hypotheses about mechanisms driving observed changes. My research also focuses on understanding current responses of lake ecosystems to climate change. I am currently conducting research in alpine, saline, and boreal lakes.

Stefano Schiaparelli
Università degli Studi di Genova, University of Genova, Italy

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Piet Spaak
Eawag, Aquatic Ecology, Dubendorf, Switzerland

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Piet Spaak is an evolutionary plankton ecologist. During his career he used Daphnia as a model organism to study the influence of environmental factors on aquatic ecosystems. He did his PhD in the Netherlands (Netherlands Institute of Ecology, NIOO-KNAW) and a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Limnology in Plön, Germany. Since 1996 he works as a group leader at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag), from 2010 until 2018 as department head of the Department of Aquatic Ecology. He teaches at ETH, with colleagues, the course “LimnoEcology”. His actual research concentrates around Daphnia (host) – parasite interactions, Daphnia genomics as well as food web ecology in lakes. At the moment he is coordinating a large international project on Lake Constance that comprises 13 sub-projects whose investigations contribute to an improved process-based understanding of the pelagic and littoral zone, as well as interactions between them.

Christian Sturmbauer
University of Graz, Austria

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Christian Sturmbauer is Professor for Zoology and Evolutionary Biology and the Head of the Department of Biology at the University of Graz and Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. His research focuses on patterns of speciation and eco-morphological diversification during adaptive radiation, addressed by a combination of genomic and comparative morphological approaches using East African cichlid species flocks as model system. Thereby the focus lies on the evolution of critical adaptive traits, shaped by the combined action of natural and sexual selection. The role of hybridization events boosting the pace of speciation is also topic of his research. The documentation of the Central European biodiversity is a second focus of research, manifesting in a leading role in the project initiative Austrian Barcode of Life (ABOL), his membership in the Commission for Interdisciplinary Ecological Studies of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and his commitment in the editorial boards of Bioinformatics and Ecology Series of the OEAW, Hydrobiologia and Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research.

Vasilis D. Valavanis
Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Iraklio, Crete, Greece

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Vasilis Valavanis is a senior researcher at the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece) promoting research based on the extensive use of satellite remote sensing, geographic information science and related modeling in marine disciplines. Since 1997, he coordinated and participated in many European Commission-funded research projects on species-environment interactions, marine habitat mapping, and essential fish habitat identification as well as several education activities through Marie Curie projects at PhD and postdoc levels. He collaborates with more than 150 co-authors and he is the author of ‘Geographic Information Systems in Oceanography and Fisheries’ (Taylor & Francis 2002), ‘Essential Fish Habitat Mapping in the Mediterranean’ (Springer 2008) and ‘Marine Ecosystems and Sustainability’ (Springer 2011). He is Associate Editor for Hydrobiologia and Scientia Marina and a member of the scientific committee of the triennial ‘International Symposium on GIS/Spatial Analyses in Fishery and Aquatic Sciences’. More information on past and current collaborative research and activities is available at: https://www.hcmr.gr/en/

Pierluigi Viaroli
Professor of Ecology at the Department of Chemistry, Life Science and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Italy

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Main research topics are: i) Biogeochemical processes and functions of inland and transitional water ecosystems; ii) Relationships among anthropogenic pressures, nutrient loadings and eutrofication in river basins and coastal lagoons; iii) Responses of benthic communities and biogeochemical processes to hydrological changes in streams and rivers. He published about 130 international peer-reviewed papers with IF, and ten conference proceedings and special issues as a guest editor in international journals. He is involved in national and international programmes, scientific societies and commissions on water quality and aquatic sciences. He was President of the Italian Society of Ecology (2007-2010) and Italian Federation of Natural and Environmental Sciences (2011-2012).