Call for Papers: Special Issue "In Recognition of Mike Hedley: Fate of Fertiliser in Soil and Mobilisation of Recalcitrant Nutrients"

This special issue will welcome reviews, research papers, and modelling studies that examine the Fate of Fertiliser in Soil and propose new ideas for Mobilisation of Recalcitrant Nutrients.
Guest Editors: Richard McDowell and Lucy Burkitt.
Submissions close on April 30, 2022.

Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems is seeking submissions for a Special Issue on Fate of Fertiliser in Soil and Mobilisation of Recalcitrant Nutrients. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by 2-3 independent reviewers and handled by the Guest Editors, in collaboration with the Journal’s Editors-in-Chief. Special issue papers accepted for publication in the Special Issue will be available online soon after acceptance, and before inclusion in the Special Issue.

Increased nutrient use efficiency and reduction of nutrient losses are needed to keep our food systems within environmental limits. In regions with application of nutrients in excess of plant requirements, long-term fertiliser use has led to a build-up of recalcitrant (also called legacy) nutrients. A reduction of fertiliser use by at least 20% by 2030 and an increased use of bio-based fertilisers are central in the Farm to Fork strategy that is part of the European Green Deal. Both require an improved understanding of the chemical forms and location of different fertilisers in the soil, and the development of strategies to mobilise recalcitrant nutrients, such as phosphorus, potassium, selenium, and molybdenum. The sequential fractionation method1,2 developed by Mike Hedley and others in the 1980s has contributed substantially to important insights into the plant availability of different forms of phosphorus. More recent approaches such as spectroscopic and isotope methods have allowed us to deepen our understanding and extend our knowledge of phosphorus and other nutrients. Therefore, this special issue will welcome reviews, research papers, and modelling studies that examine the Fate of Fertiliser in Soil and propose new ideas for Mobilising Recalcitrant Nutrients.

Papers should focus on (i) mechanisms that increase the mobilisation of recalcitrant nutrients, (ii) measurements of the size and nature of recalcitrant nutrient pools that could potentially be mobilised by different technologies, or (iii) improved conceptual models of residual nutrient cycling in soils in order to improve the fertiliser use efficiency and contribute to circular food systems. We encourage authors to consider emerging interdisciplinary developments that might be used to promote the mobilisation of recalcitrant nutrients. We are particularly interested in scalable projects that maximise the mobilisation of recalcitrant nutrients while ensuring optimal plant growth and protect planetary boundaries of nutrient flows.

Important Submission Information
To submit a manuscript for this special issue, authors should follow the steps below:

 a. Authors submit their paper through the following website https://www.editorialmanager.com/fres

 b. In “Additional information”, authors must select that the article is part of a Special Issue and select the Special issue title: “SI: In Recognition of Mike Hedley”.

References
1Hedley, M.J., Stewart, J.W.B. and Chauhan, B.S., 1982a. Changes in inorganic and organic soil phosphorus fractions by cultivation practices and by laboratory incubations. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J., 46: 970-976.

2Hedley, M.J., White, R.E. and Nye, P.H., 1982b. Plant induced changes in the rhizosphere of rape, Brassica napus var. Emerald. seedlings. III. Changes in L value, soil phosphate fractions, and phosphatase activity. New Phytol., 91: 45-56.