Basic Biochemistry © LABSTER

Basic Biochemistry

With “Basic Biochemistry” you will soon master the techniques needed to work in a biochemistry  lab. This package offers you the following 4 simulations:


Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Join your friend on a quest to analyze two mysterious substances he got from an alchemist to cure his migraine, and learn how atoms connect.


Food Macromolecules

Can you use your food macromolecule knowledge to convince your friend to change her diet to a healthier one?


Carbohydrates

The Carbohydrates Lab explores how carbohydrates are broken down by the digestive system and taken up into the bloodstream.


Enzyme Kinetics

Investigate Alcohol Flush Syndrome by studying Alcohol Dehydrogenase kinetics. Learn how to use a spectrophotometer, perform an enzyme kinetics experiment, analyze data and understand different inhibition mechanisms.

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About the Ionic and Covalent Bonds Virtual Simulation Lab:

Have you ever wondered how atoms are held together? In this simulation, you will learn the basics about atomic bonding in ionic and covalent compounds, and how to distinguish those compounds experimentally. With all this knowledge, you will help your friend analyze two mysterious substances he received from an alchemist. By testing their specific physical properties, you’ll be able to identify the nature of the substances. Finally, you will learn how ions form lattice structures and how this influences the property of a compound.


Test solubility and conductivity

Atoms can interact in many different ways, giving a compound specific properties. In the first mission of the Ionic and Covalent Bonds simulation, your task is to choose appropriate laboratory equipment to test the solubility and conductivity of the two substances. You will explore how these properties differ in ionic and covalent compounds.


Draw Lewis dot structures

In the second part of the Ionic and Covalent Bonds simulation, you will learn about the octet rule and how to apply this to building Lewis dot structures in a virtual drawing activity. You will see that there are many ways that covalent bonds can be formed, depending on the compound and electron configuration. You will also learn how to identify lone electron pairs in a covalent bond.


Determine melting points

In the last mission, your task is to determine the melting point of the two substances by using melting point apparatus. You will explore how your results are connected to the ability of ions to form a lattice structure.


Will you be able to identify the two mysterious substances and help your friend cure his migraine?



About the Introduction to Food Macromolecules Virtual Simulation Lab:

Macromolecules are very large molecules created by the polymerization of small units called monomers. Most of the macromolecules are present in everyday life, for instance in food.


Learn about biological macromolecules

There are several types of biological macromolecules: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lipids and Nucleic acids. All macromolecules, except lipids, are polymers. A polymer is a long molecule composed of chains of monomers. Monomers are small molecules that serve as building blocks of polymers. In addition, there are also oligomers in nature. Oligomers are molecular complex composed of a few monomer units, instead of the theoretical unlimited nature of polymers. Dimers and trimers are, for instance, oligomers composed of two and three monomers, respectively, such as lactose in milk for instance. However, in biochemistry, an oligomer usually refers to a macromolecular complex formed by non-covalent bonding of a few macromolecules, like nucleic acids or proteins. A clear example is those oligomers related to many neurodegenerative diseases, such as the alpha-synuclein aggregations in Parkinson’s disease.


Help your friend with your macromolecule knowledge

In the Introduction to Food Macromolecules simulation, you will help your friend get a healthy diet and investigate the types of macromolecules found in food. By performing a series of biochemistry tests, you will know the contents of various food items.


Can you use your macromolecule knowledge to convince your friend to change her diet to a healthier one?



About the Carbohydrates Virtual Simulation Lab:

Most people are familiar with carbohydrates, especially when it comes to what we eat. For example, to lose weight, some individuals adhere to “low-carb” diets. Athletes, in contrast, often “carbohydrate-load” before important competitions to ensure that they have enough energy to compete at a high level.


Different types of carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are an essential part of a diet because they provide energy to the body. Grains, fruits, and vegetables are all natural sources of carbohydrates for energy. These foods consist of both soluble and insoluble carbohydrates. The insoluble part is known as fiber, which is mostly cellulose.


Learn how carbohydrates are digested

Your goal in the Carbohydrates lab is to learn how carbohydrates are digested and utilized by the body as an energy source. Use the in-lab molecule visualizer to study the chemical structure of sugars and learn the basics of molecule structures and chemical formulas. You will also perform a real experiment and get a sense of how the amylase breaks down starch. A 3D animation will visualize the molecular process of carbohydrate digestion.


Test the effect on blood glucose levels

You will find that the effect on the blood glucose level is very different, depending on the composition of food. For that reason, you can choose different food items and measure the increase of the blood glucose level of a virtual test subject.


Will you be able to use your carbohydrates knowledge to figure out which foods will cause a spike in the blood glucose levels?




About the Enzyme Kinetics Virtual Simulation Lab:

In the Enzyme Kinetics Lab, you will learn how substrates are converted into products by catalysis. You will also learn all about the kinetics of enzyme involving the Michaelis-Menten equation and various rate constants, as well as DNA mutation and hyperactivity. You will get to run experiments using the enzyme Alcohol Dehydrogenase on a wild and mutant type to learn about Alcohol Flush Syndrome.


Use a spectrophotometer to measure enzyme reaction

In the Enzyme Kinetics lab, you will access a fully equipped workbench where you can prepare the Alcohol Dehydrogenase reaction and measure the product of Acetylaldehyde using a spectrophotometer. You will learn about the concept of spectrophotometry, how to prepare a master mix and how to calculate dilution. You will try to prepare a reaction in a 1 ml cuvette and measure the amount of product formed using the spectrophotometer.


See it all on a molecular level

Supplementary 3D animations illustrate what happens at the molecular level when the substrate and co-factor enter the active site. During the 3D animations, you will also answer quiz questions to test your understanding of the concepts. The animations are interactive, so you can identify the substrate by clicking on the different molecules.


Experiment freely and measure the results

For every measurement, you receive a progress curve displaying amounts of product formed over time. You must then analyze the outcome data and plot your own Michaelis-Menten graph to find the Km and Vmax for each enzyme. By comparing Km and Vmax values of the wild type vs. mutant Alcohol Dehydrogenase, you will be able to understand the Alcohol Flush Syndrome. With the newly added module of enzyme inhibition, you are asked to perform different enzyme inhibition experiments using three different inhibitors. You can measure product formation using several inhibitor concentrations, extract the data, create your own Lineweaver-Burk plot and solve the Ki.


Updated with a mathematically based simulator

We have recently upgraded the Enzyme Kinetics lab by implementing a mathematically based simulator. This provides you with a larger flexibility in conducting the experiments, allowing you to change parameters such as substrate concentrations, enzyme concentrations, temperature or pH and receive the corresponding results. In this semi-guided module, you can experiment with different parameters in order to find the optimal temperature and pH to reach the highest initial reaction rate.


Upon completing the Enzyme Kinetics lab, you will be familiar with the kinetics of enzyme Alcohol Dehydrogenase. Will you be able to use your newly acquired knowledge to perform the experiment and analyze the data outcome? And can you apply your knowledge to the real life example of Alcohol Dehydrogenase and the Alcohol Flush Syndrome?

Contact | Information material

For further information about our in-house seminars, company terms and conditions or questions regarding our content please get in touch with us via email, phone or the contact form. We would also be pleased to send you our 'Offers for companies' information brochure. We look forward to hearing from you.

Merlet Behncke-Braunbeck
Director Distance Learning
Tel.:  +49 (0) 6221 487 8061
E-mail: merlet.braunbeck@springer.com.

Please contact me directly or use the quick & easy
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Date | Price | Audience


Course: 

Package: 4 courses


Co-operation partner: 

Labster


Time to complete course: 

30 - 50 min


Level:

Basic


Price:

please contact Merlet Behncke-Braunbeck


Date:

Start possible at any time


Booking:

Companies can book this course for their employees directly at Springer Campus.


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