SpringerBriefs in Ecology

The Evolution of Mammalian Sociality in an Ecological Perspective

Authors: Jones, Clara B

  • Situates the field of mammalian social biology beyond single species and populations
  • Offers new notations for group and individual social competition among species
  • Provides an ecological perspective of vertebrate sociality
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eBook $39.99
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-03931-2
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  • Included format: EPUB, PDF
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  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Softcover $54.99
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-3-319-03930-5
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
About this book

This brief discusses factors associated with group formation, group maintenance, group population structure, and other events and processes (e.g., physiology, behavior) related to mammalian social evolution. Within- and between-lineages, features of prehistoric and extant social mammals, patterns and linkages are discussed as components of a possible social “tool-kit”.  "Top-down” (predators to nutrients), as well as “bottom-up” (nutrients to predators) effects are assessed.  The present synthesis also emphasizes outcomes of Hebbian (synaptic) decisions on Malthusian parameters (growth rates of populations) and their consequences for (shifting) mean fitnesses of populations.  Ecology and evolution (EcoEvo) are connected via the organism’s “norms of reaction” (genotype x environment interactions; life-history tradeoffs of reproduction, survival, and growth) exposed to selection, with the success of genotypes influenced by intensities of selection as well as neutral (e.g. mutation rates) and stochastic effects.  At every turn, life history trajectories are assumed to arise from “decisions” made by types responding to competition for limiting resources constrained by Hamilton’s rule (inclusive fitness operations).

About the authors

Clara B. Jones received her Ph.D. in Biopsychology from Cornell University. Since then she has served as Harvard University Postdoctoral Fellow in Population Genetics and as visiting faculty at Rutgers University in New Jersey as well as a visiting researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology in Bavaria. Dr. Jones has conducted fieldwork in Central and South America and has published over 100 articles and book chapters as well as four books.

Table of contents (10 chapters)

  • Introduction: Definitions, Background

    Jones, Clara B.

    Pages 1-7

  • Competition for Limiting Resources, Hamilton’s Rule, and Chesson’s R*

    Jones, Clara B.

    Pages 9-18

  • Flexible and Derived Varieties of Mammalian Social Organization: Promiscuity in Aggregations May Have Served as a Recent “Toolkit” Giving Rise to “Sexual Segregation,” Polygynous Social Structures, Monogamy, Polyandry, and Leks

    Jones, Clara B.

    Pages 19-36

  • Multimale-Multifemale Groups and “Nested” Architectures: Collaboration Among Mammalian Males

    Jones, Clara B.

    Pages 37-45

  • Higher “Grades” of Sociality in Class Mammalia: Primitive Eusociality

    Jones, Clara B.

    Pages 47-54

Buy this book

eBook $39.99
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-03931-2
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: EPUB, PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Softcover $54.99
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-3-319-03930-5
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
The Evolution of Mammalian Sociality in an Ecological Perspective
Authors
Series Title
SpringerBriefs in Ecology
Copyright
2014
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright Holder
Clara B. Jones
eBook ISBN
978-3-319-03931-2
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-03931-2
Softcover ISBN
978-3-319-03930-5
Series ISSN
2192-4759
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XI, 112
Number of Illustrations and Tables
8 b/w illustrations, 3 illustrations in colour
Topics