People and Computers XVI - Memorable Yet Invisible

Proceedings of HCI 2002

Editors: Faulkner, Xristine, Finlay, Janet, Detienne, Francoise (Eds.)

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About this book

For the last 20 years the dominant form of user interface has been the Graphical User Interface (GUl) with direct manipulation. As software gets more complicated and more and more inexperienced users come into contact with computers, enticed by the World Wide Web and smaller mobile devices, new interface metaphors are required. The increasing complexity of software has introduced more options to the user. This seemingly increased control actually decreases control as the number of options and features available to them overwhelms the users and 'information overload' can occur (Lachman, 1997). Conversational anthropomorphic interfaces provide a possible alternative to the direct manipulation metaphor. The aim of this paper is to investigate users reactions and assumptions when interacting with anthropomorphic agents. Here we consider how the level of anthropomorphism exhibited by the character and the level of interaction affects these assumptions. We compared characters of different levels of anthropomorphic abstraction, from a very abstract character to a realistic yet not human character. As more software is released for general use with anthropomorphic interfaces there seems to be no consensus of what the characters should look like and what look is more suited for different applications. Some software and research opts for realistic looking characters (for example, Haptek Inc., see http://www.haptek.com). others opt for cartoon characters (Microsoft, 1999) others opt for floating heads (Dohi & Ishizuka, 1997; Takama & Ishizuka, 1998; Koda, 1996; Koda & Maes, 1996a; Koda & Maes, 1996b).

Table of contents (24 chapters)

  • Fun, Communication and Dependability: Extending the Concept of Usability

    Monk, Andrew F.

    Pages 3-14

  • Invisible but Audible: Enhancing Information Awareness through Anthropomorphic Speech

    Ribeiro, Nuno M. (et al.)

    Pages 17-35

  • User Perception of Anthropomorphic Characters with Varying Levels of Interaction

    Power, Guillermo (et al.)

    Pages 37-51

  • A Tool for Performing and Analysing Experiments on Graphical Communication

    Healey, Patrick G. T. (et al.)

    Pages 55-68

  • A Comparison of Text Messaging and Email Support for Digital Communities: A Case Study

    Longmate, Elizabeth (et al.)

    Pages 69-87

Buy this book

eBook $74.99
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-1-4471-0105-5
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Softcover $99.00
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-85233-659-2
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
People and Computers XVI - Memorable Yet Invisible
Book Subtitle
Proceedings of HCI 2002
Editors
  • Xristine Faulkner
  • Janet Finlay
  • Francoise Detienne
Copyright
2002
Publisher
Springer-Verlag London
Copyright Holder
Springer-Verlag London
eBook ISBN
978-1-4471-0105-5
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4471-0105-5
Softcover ISBN
978-1-85233-659-2
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XIII, 422
Number of Illustrations and Tables
73 b/w illustrations
Topics