SpringerBriefs in Archaeological Heritage Management

Managing, Using, and Interpreting Hadrian's Wall as World Heritage

Editors: Stone, Peter, Brough, David (Eds.)

  • Discusses the management of Hadrian's Wall over a twenty year period
  • Addresses important issues and developments in the management of large scale complex heritage sites
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eBook $34.99
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  • ISBN 978-1-4614-9351-8
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Softcover $49.95
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  • ISBN 978-1-4614-9350-1
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About this book

Hadrian’s Wall was inscribed as a World Heritage Site (WHS) in 1987 and, with the German Limes, became one of the first two parts of the transnational ‘Frontiers of the Roman Empire’ (FRE) WHS in 2005. The World Heritage Site of Hadrian's Wall is unusual, although not unique, among World Heritage sites in its scale and linear nature: stretching from Ravenglass on the west coast of England to Newcastle upon Tyne on the east coast - over 150 miles. Along its length it passes through two major urban centres and a variety of rural landscapes and its remains vary from substantial upstanding architectural features to invisible below ground archaeology. Traditionally many of the constituent parts of Hadrian's Wall, forts etc, have been managed as separate entities by different State and private organisations. These and other issues make it an extremely complex WHS to manage. This book not only chronicles the past management of the Wall but also looks towards the future as more countries aspire to have their Roman frontiers added to the FRE. The experience gained over the last two decades illustrates developments in the management of large scale complex heritage sites that will be of value as a detailed case study to those involved in (and affected by) heritage management, as well as academics, and students. Many of the issues raised will find resonance in those faced by many other large (World) heritage sites.

About the authors

Peter Stone is Head of School of Arts and Cultures and Professor of Heritage Studies in the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies at Newcastle University. He was a member of the Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site Management Plan Committee between 1998 and 2012 and Chair of the Committee between 2005 and 2012. He has published widely on heritage management, interpretation and education and has worked extensively overseas. In the mid 1990s he helped UNESCO develop the World Heritage Education Programme and draft the World Heritage in Young Hands kit. He was a member of the National Trust’s Archaeology Advisory Panel between 2005 and 2012. In 2004 he worked with the North East Regional Development Agency regarding the economic value of World Heritage Sites. He is currently working with the Xi’an Municipal Administration of Cultural Heritage and the Institute of Archaeology of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences on heritage management issues in China. Before joining Newcastle University in 1997 Peter worked for ten years for the English Heritage Education Service during which time he was seconded for a year to be Regional Administrator for the South West, where he was responsible for the day-to-day management of 104 properties including Stonehenge and Avebury.

David Brough is a former Development Manager with Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Ltd, who now works as an independent heritage management consultant. He acted as Joint Editor of the Hadrian’s Wall Management Plan 2008-14, and then as acting Management Plan Co-ordinator was responsible for the development of the Interest Groups to coordinate the implementation of the Plan. David has also provided advice to the Frontiers of the Roman Empire Management Group on the preparation of the Site’s retrospective Statement of Outstanding Universal Value and the compilation of its Periodic Report. In parallel with this he completed an MLitt research degree which investigated the concept of serial World Heritage Sites and their policy and procedural implications and included a case study of the FRE WHS identifying factors which have influenced progress in its establishment and development and consider the wider applicability of this experience. He is currently working with Newcastle University in the development of initiatives to support the development of heritage management in Xi’an, China.

Table of contents (12 chapters)

  • Managing Hadrian’s Wall in the Twenty-First Century

    Stone, Peter G.

    Pages 1-7

  • The Archaeology, History and Significance of Hadrian’s Wall

    Breeze, David J.

    Pages 9-13

  • The Management Context

    Young, Christopher

    Pages 15-20

  • The Need for a Management Plan and the 1st and 2nd Plans

    Young, Christopher

    Pages 21-32

  • Hadrian’s Wall Tourism Partnership

    Brantom, Jane

    Pages 33-45

Buy this book

eBook $34.99
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-1-4614-9351-8
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: EPUB, PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Softcover $49.95
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-4614-9350-1
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Managing, Using, and Interpreting Hadrian's Wall as World Heritage
Editors
  • Peter Stone
  • David Brough
Series Title
SpringerBriefs in Archaeological Heritage Management
Series Volume
2
Copyright
2014
Publisher
Springer-Verlag New York
Copyright Holder
The Author(s)
eBook ISBN
978-1-4614-9351-8
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4614-9351-8
Softcover ISBN
978-1-4614-9350-1
Series ISSN
2192-5313
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XII, 139
Number of Illustrations and Tables
30 illustrations in colour
Topics