Studies in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory

The Navajo Sound System

Authors: McDonough, J.M.

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About this book

The Navajo language is spoken by the Navajo people who live in the Navajo Nation, located in Arizona and New Mexico in the southwestern United States. The Navajo language belongs to the Southern, or Apachean, branch of the Athabaskan language family. Athabaskan languages are closely related by their shared morphological structure; these languages have a productive and extensive inflectional morphology. The Northern Athabaskan languages are primarily spoken by people indigenous to the sub-artic stretches of North America. Related Apachean languages are the Athabaskan languages of the Southwest: Chiricahua, Jicarilla, White Mountain and Mescalero Apache. While many other languages, like English, have benefited from decades of research on their sound and speech systems, instrumental analyses of indigenous languages are relatively rare. There is a great deal ofwork to do before a chapter on the acoustics of Navajo comparable to the standard acoustic description of English can be produced. The kind of detailed phonetic description required, for instance, to synthesize natural sounding speech, or to provide a background for clinical studies in a language is well beyond the scope of a single study, but it is necessary to begin this greater work with a fundamental description of the sounds and supra-segmental structure of the language. Inkeeping with this, the goal of this project is to provide a baseline description of the phonetic structure of Navajo, as it is spoken on the Navajo reservation today, to provide a foundation for further work on the language.

Reviews

From the review by Daniel L. Everett, Illinois State University, published in Language 83 (2007): "This book was a pleasure to read. It is laid out well, the spectrograms are clear, and the writing is clear and well-organized. I strongly recommend NSS [The Navajo Sound System] to all Americanists as an example of the kind of detail and care that - in an ideal world - should be standard in all efforts to document and describe Native American Languages."


Table of contents (7 chapters)

Buy this book

eBook $39.99
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-94-010-0207-3
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover $209.00
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-4020-1351-5
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
Softcover $54.95
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-4020-1352-2
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
The Navajo Sound System
Authors
Series Title
Studies in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory
Series Volume
55
Copyright
2003
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright Holder
Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
eBook ISBN
978-94-010-0207-3
DOI
10.1007/978-94-010-0207-3
Hardcover ISBN
978-1-4020-1351-5
Softcover ISBN
978-1-4020-1352-2
Series ISSN
0924-4670
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XIII, 212
Topics