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Changes in Censuses from Imperialist to Welfare States

How Societies and States Count

Authors: Emigh, Rebecca Jean, Riley, Dylan, Ahmed, Patricia

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  • ISBN 978-1-137-48506-9
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Hardcover $105.00
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  • ISBN 978-1-137-48505-2
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About this book

Changes in Censuses from Imperialist to Welfare States , the second of two volumes, uses historical and comparative methods to analyze censuses or census-like information in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Italy, starting in England over one-thousand years ago.

About the authors

   

Reviews

"In this magnificent volume, Emigh, Riley, and Ahmed overturn many of the theoretical models of modern census-taking. Drawing on extensive primary and secondary sources, they compare the histories of the US, British, and Italian censuses and show that they were not simply mechanisms of state control. Rather, they reflected a complex interaction among political elites, civil society, and census experts, with different outcomes in different countries. This will be a key text in the field." - Edward Higgs, Professor and Head of Department, History, University of Essex, UK

"This book provides an informative survey of modern censuses in Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. It brings together state-centered and society-centered perspectives to demonstrate the vibrancy of censuses that inhabit the nexus between state and society. The authors convincingly argue that censuses rely not only on state power but on lay categories that regular people understand. They combine historical and comparative methods to discuss fascinating debates over race, class, region, and eugenics." - Kathrin Levitan, Associate Professor of History, College of William and Mary, USA

"This comparative assessment of the history of the census in Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States makes wonderful use of vast body of research. The authors convincingly use a historical approach to interpret the evolution of population counts as the result of the different ways that states and societies interact. Thus, the authors highlight the unintentional effects of actors' long-run choices, going beyond the short-term perspective that often characterizes social sciences." - Giovanni Favero, Associate Professor, Department of Management and Economic History, Universit√† Ca'Foscari, Venice, Italy   


   

Table of contents (8 chapters)

  • States, Societies, and Censuses

    Emigh, Rebecca Jean (et al.)

    Pages 7-20

  • The Dominance of Class in the UK Censuses

    Emigh, Rebecca Jean (et al.)

    Pages 27-52

  • The Development of Race and Occupation in the US Censuses

    Emigh, Rebecca Jean (et al.)

    Pages 53-81

  • Regionalism, Nationalism, and the Italian Censuses

    Emigh, Rebecca Jean (et al.)

    Pages 83-113

  • The Turn to Race and Ethnicity in the UK Censuses

    Emigh, Rebecca Jean (et al.)

    Pages 121-146

Buy this book

eBook $79.99
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-137-48506-9
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover $105.00
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-137-48505-2
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Changes in Censuses from Imperialist to Welfare States
Book Subtitle
How Societies and States Count
Authors
Copyright
2016
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan US
Copyright Holder
The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s)
eBook ISBN
978-1-137-48506-9
DOI
10.1057/9781137485069
Hardcover ISBN
978-1-137-48505-2
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
IX, 267
Topics