The Springer Series on Human Exceptionality

Student Motivation

The Culture and Context of Learning

Editors: Salili, Farideh, Chi-yue Chiu, Ying-yi Hong (Eds.)

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  • ISBN 978-1-4615-1273-8
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About this book

Ever since the advent of the intelligence test we have thought of exceptional achievement in terms of cognitive attributes. We have words and phrases like "genius," "above average intelligence," "average" and "mentally deficient" to describe different levels of cognitive ability. In the United States widespread use of intelligence tests followed the success of the in World War I, and for the next half-century Army Alpha and Beta Tests intelligence tests were the major measures used to predict school and vocational achievement. Learning was primarily studied in laboratories, and the behaviorist theories that were dominant largely dealt with changes in overt behavior. As a result there was relatively little influence of learning research on concepts involving cognition and intelligence. The transition from behaviorism to cognitive psychology that began in the 1940's and 50's came into full flower in the 1970's and 80's, and great progress was made in understanding learning, memory, and thinking. In the decades following World War I there had been many debates about the possible influence of environmental conditions on intelligence, but the cognitive abilities measured by intelligence tests were generally believed to be determined by heredity. The intelligence tests of cognitive abilities correlated substantially with academic performance; so their use in determining which students needed special help in school or which students were capable of university work was widely accepted. As cognitive psychology became dominant, it became apparent that although heredity was important, intelligence consisted of learnable abilities.

Table of contents (16 chapters)

  • The Culture and Context of Learning

    Salili, Farideh (et al.)

    Pages 1-14

  • Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Theories of Motivation from an Attribution Perspective

    Weiner, Bernard

    Pages 17-30

  • Inferences about Responsibility and Values: Implication for Academic Motivation

    Graham, Sandra

    Pages 31-59

  • The Social Functions of Attributional Face Saving Tactics

    Juvonen, Jaana

    Pages 61-77

  • Declining Optimism in Ethnic Minority Students: The Role of Attributions and Self-Esteem

    Laar, Colette

    Pages 79-104

Buy this book

eBook $179.00
price for USA (gross)
  • ISBN 978-1-4615-1273-8
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover $269.00
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-0-306-46524-6
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
Softcover $229.00
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-1-4613-5472-7
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Student Motivation
Book Subtitle
The Culture and Context of Learning
Editors
  • Farideh Salili
  • Chi-yue Chiu
  • Ying-yi Hong
Series Title
The Springer Series on Human Exceptionality
Copyright
2001
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright Holder
Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers
eBook ISBN
978-1-4615-1273-8
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4615-1273-8
Hardcover ISBN
978-0-306-46524-6
Softcover ISBN
978-1-4613-5472-7
Series ISSN
1572-5642
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XXIV, 364
Topics