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Psychology - Psychology & Law | Remaking Transitional Justice in the United States - The Rhetorical Authorization of the Greensboro

Remaking Transitional Justice in the United States

The Rhetorical Authorization of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Beitler III, James Edward

2013, XVIII, 158 p.

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  • ​Takes a language-oriented approach to the field of transitional justice
  • Explores the first truth commission of its kind in the U.S.
  • Serves as guide to practitioners of transitional justice who are looking for strategies to garner authority for their initiatives
  • Reveals some of the global interconnections between various transitional justice initiatives.

Remaking Transitional Justice in the United States explores rhetorical attempts to authorize the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission—a grassroots initiative established in Greensboro, North Carolina in 2004 to investigate a traumatic and controversial event in the city’s past.

The book demonstrates that the field of transitional justice has given rise to a transnational rhetorical tradition that provides practitioners with resources to act in their own particular contexts. It then shows, through detailed analyses, how the Greensboro commissioners and their advocates made use of this rhetorical tradition in their attempts to establish the Commission’s authority in the community. Calling attention to the rhetorical moves shared among those working in the field of transitional justice, this study offers insights into the development of transitional justice in the United States and other liberal democracies.

This book is relevant to scholars and practitioners of transitional justice as it describes mechanisms of transitional justice that are frequently overlooked: rhetorical mechanisms. It also speaks to any readers interested in the communicative strategies of truth commissions.

Content Level » Research

Keywords » Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission - South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission - discourse of transitional justice - restitution for past injustices - rhetoric of transitional justice - transnational truth commissions

Related subjects » Personality & Social Psychology - Political Science - Psychology & Law

Table of contents 

​Chapter 1. The Problem of Power: Authorizing Transitional Justice in Greensboro, NorthCarolina.-Chapter 2. The Rhetorical Tradition of Transitional Justice.-Chapter 3: "A Person is a Person Through Other Persons": Reaccentuating Ubuntu in Greensboro.-Chapter 4. Reaccentuating Representivity in Greensboro.-Chapter 5. Redefining “Truth Commission”: Definitional Maneuvering in the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Final Report.-Chapter 6. “Inescapable Networks of Mutuality”: The Development of Transitional Justicein the United States.  

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