Logo - springer
Slogan - springer

Psychology - Cognitive Psychology | Cognitive, Affective, & Behaviorial Neuroscience (Press)

Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience

Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience

Editor-in-Chief: Marie Banich

ISSN: 1530-7026 (print version)
ISSN: 1531-135X (electronic version)

Journal no. 13415

$99.00 Personal Rate e-only for the Americas
Get Subscription

Online subscription, valid from January through December of current calendar year

Immediate access to this year's issues via SpringerLink

1 Volume(-s) with 6 issue(-s) per annual subscription

Automatic annual renewal

More information: >> FAQs // >> Policy

New York | Heidelberg, 11 December 2012

Words have feelings

Emotion in voices helps capture the listener’s attention, but in the long run the words are not remembered as accurately

13415
Does the emotion in our voice have a lasting effect? According to Annett Schirmer and colleagues from the National University of Singapore, emotion helps us recognize words quicker and more accurately straight away. In the longer term however, we do not remember emotionally intoned speech as accurately as neutral speech. When we do remember the words, they have acquired an emotional value; for example words spoken in a sad voice are remembered as more negative than words spoken in a neutral voice.
The study, looking at the role of emotion in word recognition memory, is published online in Springer's journal Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience.
In anger, sadness, exhilaration or fear, speech takes on an urgency that is lacking from its normal even-tempered form. It becomes louder or softer, more hurried or delayed, more melodic, erratic or monotonous. And this emotional speech immediately captures a listener's attention. Schirmer and colleagues' work looks at whether emotion has a lasting effect on word memory.
A total of 48 men and 48 women listened to sadly and neutrally spoken words and were later shown these words in a visual test, examining word recognition and attitudes to these words. The authors also measured brain activity to look for evidence of vocal emotional coding.
Their analyses showed that participants recognized words better when they had previously heard them in the neutral tone compared with the sad tone. In addition, words were remembered more negatively if they had previously been heard in a sad voice.
The researchers also looked at gender differences in word processing. They found that women were more sensitive to the emotional elements than men, and were more likely than men to recall the emotion of the speaker's voice. Current levels of the female sex hormone estrogen predicted these differences.
Schirmer and team conclude: "Emotional voices produce changes in long-term memory, as well as capturing the listener's attention. They influence how easily spoken words are later recognized and what emotions are assigned to them. Thus voices, like other emotional signals, affect listeners beyond the immediate present."
Reference:
Schirmer A et al (2012). Vocal emotions influence verbal memory: neural correlates and inter-individual differences. Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience; DOI 10.3758/s13415-012-0132-8
The full-text article is available to journalists on request.

Contact: 

For authors and editors


  • Journal Citation Reports®
    2016 Impact Factor
  • 3.263
  • Aims and Scope

    Aims and Scope

    Close

    Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience publishes theoretical, review, and primary research articles concerned with behavior and brain processes in humans, both normal participants and patients with brain injuries or processes that influence brain function, such as neurological disorders (including both healthy and disordered aging) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., schizophrenia and depression). In addition, articles that use animal models to address cognitive or affective processes involving behavioral, invasive, or imaging methods are also highly welcome. One of the main goals of CABN is to be the premier outlet for strongly psychologically motivated studies of brain–behavior relationships. Thus, the editors highly encourage papers with clear integration between psychological theory and the conduct and interpretation of the neuroscientific data. Articles will be appropriate to the journal if they cover: (1) topics relating to cognition, such as perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and decision-making; (2) topics concerning emotional processes, motivation, reward prediction, and affective states; and (3) topics relating to individual differences in relevant domains, including personality. In all cases, the editors will give highest priority to papers that report a combination of behavioral and neuroscientific methods to address these research topics.

    Further, the editors will give highest priority to papers that include sample sizes that provide adequate power.  The fields of psychology and functional neuroimaging have become increasingly concerned that small sample sizes contribute to replication failures in the literature, and are converging on the consensus that there is a need to increase minimum samples sizes.

    We also invite synthetic papers that make use of computational and other approaches to formal modeling. CABN also welcomes multistudy empirical articles or articles integrating multiple methods and approaches to understanding brain–behavior relationships.

    For Manuscript Submission information and Author Instructions, please visit the Psychonomic Society homepage at:

    http://www.psychonomic-journals.org

  • Submit Online
  • Open Choice - Your Way to Open Access
  • Instructions for Authors

    Instructions for Authors

    Close

  • Author Academy: Training for Authors
  • Copyright Information

    Copyright Information

    Close

    Copyright of this Journal is held by The Psychonomic Society, Inc. However, for questions relating to permissions, please visit the following website: http://www.springer.com/rights?SGWID=0-122-0-0-0

Services for the Journal

Alerts for this journal

 

Get the table of contents of every new issue published in Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience.