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Philosophy - Philosophical Traditions | Call for Papers - Special Issues

Call for Papers - Special Issues

Submit your research online for these forthcoming special issues of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:

Social Facts: Metaphysical and Empirical Perspectives 

Special Issue on Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences

Guest Editors:
Alessandro Salice (Universität Basel & Universität Wien)
Luca Tummolini (ISTC-CNR, Rome)
Social facts like money, marriages, debts, universities, driving licenses, cocktail parties, etc.,
influence our decisions and have pervasive effects on our daily lives. Since their existence is
presupposed by much of what we do, it seems indeed pointless to argue against their ontological
objectivity. At the same time, one might wonder in what sense these facts bear genuine
existence: a look at their structure rapidly reveals that the beliefs, linguistic uses and collective
practices of a community necessarily constitute these sorts of facts. Understanding the hybrid
nature of these entities is one of the prominent tasks of social ontology.
This endeavor, however, seems to lead to a debate that swings between irreconcilable positions:
from reductionist explanations championed in part of the analytical tradition, to more permissive
ontologies endorsed by some phenomenologists. At the same time, an empirical approach is
fostered by the cognitive sciences, which recently have begun to explore the cognitive abilities
required to constitute social reality and to participate in collective phenomena. Despite the
fecundity of all these research agendas within social ontology, little attention has been devoted to
fostering a dialogue among these different approaches. On the one hand, the securing of
empirical data, as well as the explanations offered by the cognitive sciences, can constrain
theoretical debates and refine the suggested categorial frameworks. On the other hand,
metaphysical investigations, by
critically assessing the implicit assumptions and the ontological commitments of the behavioral
sciences, distinguish the ontological layers in which reality is articulated and hence indicate new
directions of empirical investigation. Can metaphysical analyses of social facts inform current
empirical practice in the cognitive sciences? How might empirical evidence influence social
ontologies?
A special issue of the Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences will be devoted to this
interdisciplinary dialogue. Possible topics include:
- Collective intentionality and its place within social reality;
- Analyses of social practices;
- Metaphysical conceptions of social facts;
- The relationships between social beliefs and social facts;
- The relations between social practices and social facts;
- Conventions and institutions;
- Analyses of joint attention, action, belief and intention;
- Types of social facts and social objects.
*Practical Information*
Word limit: 8000 words
Deadline for submissions: 15 May 2012
Publication is expected during 2013
Peer review: all submissions will be subject to a double blind peer-review process. Please
prepare your submission for blind reviewing.
Submissions should be made directly to the journal’s online submission website
(http://www.editorialmanager.com/phen) indicating: special issue “Social Facts: Metaphysical
and Empirical Perspectives”.
For further details, please check the website of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:
http://www.springer.com/philosophy/philosophical+traditions/journal/11097
For any further questions regarding the special issue please contact Alessandro Salice
(alessandro.salice@univie.ac.at) or Luca Tummolini (luca.tummolini@istc.cnr.it).

How to Submit 

All submissions should be made directly to the journal’s Editorial Manager. When asked to indicate type of submission authors should indicate Special Issue.

“Oral phenomenology” 

Special Issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences

Guest Editor:
István Aranyosi (Bilkent University)
aranyosi@bilkent.edu.tr
The oral cavity is an anatomical unit most relevant to contemporary
approaches in the philosophy and psychology of perception which consider
the senses as integrated perceptual systems, and perception as an active
phenomenon dependent on such systems (e.g. James Gibson’s influential work
in ecological psychology). The mouth is a fine-tuned multi-modal
“machine”, capable of participating in and modulating a countless number
of types of multimodal experiences, involving interdependent sensations of
taste, smell, tactile feel, sound, heat. Sensory properties like flavor,
mouthfeel, texture, palatability, are known to be multisensory and highly
integrated. The mouth is also fine-tuned to discriminating extremely small
solid particles present in various types of orally processed volumes,
which makes it the perfect tactile sensor. It is also hypersensitive to
the presence of solid particles caught between the teeth, which explains
the existence of the oldest specifically hominid and ubiquitous habit of
tooth picking, and which lead some physical anthropologists to speculate
about language emergence in hominid populations, based on the fact that
both this out of proportion sensation and the sensations required for
phonation are dependent on the same neural pathways.
There is an emerging interest in interdisciplinary research on the oral
cavity, involving food science and sensory psychology, e.g. texture
studies, food rheology (flow properties of food under the conditions of
forces applied to it in the mouth), food tribology (wear, friction, and
salivatory lubrication properties involved in oral food processing),
sensory evaluation of food, cognitive penetration of food and drink
experiences, phonation and speech perception etc..
This special issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences seeks to
promote the potential input from philosophy into these and related topics,
as well as the potential influence of empirical results established in the
above mentioned scientific fields on current philosophical and
interdisciplinary debates on oral perception and perception in general.
Some suggested topics include:
* Flavour perception and objective qualities
* Primary and secondary qualities of food
* Taste-smell interactions, retronasal olfaction
* Visual penetration of flavour experience * Aural aspect of food texture perception, bone conduction and food sounds * Ecological psychology and orally accessible affordances * Early developmental oral experience and haptic perception * Nutritional, hedonic, and cultural value of food * Oral food processing (chewing, tongue action, salivatory lubrication, and deglutition) and the sensorimotor theory of perception * Teeth, speech, and speech perception * Dental anthropology and the evolution of mind and language * Disgust and palatability * Novel culinary experiences: progressive, deconstructive and molecular haute cuisine. There will be a small number of invited contributions, thus leaving a generous space for submitted papers. Confirmed invited authors: Fiona Macpherson (Philosophy, Glasgow) Barry C. Smith (Philosophy, Birkbeck College, London) Charles Spence (Experimental Psychology, Oxford)

*Submission information* 

Word limit: 8000 words Deadline for submissions: the 1st of July, 2013 Publication is expected during 2014 Peer review: all submissions will be subject to a double blind peer-review process. Please prepare your submission for blind reviewing. Submissions should be made directly to the journal’s online submission website (http://www.editorialmanager.com/phen) indicating: special issue “Oral Phenomenology”. For further details, please check the website of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences: http://www.springer.com/philosophy/philosophical+traditions/journal/11097 For any further questions regarding the special issue please contact István Aranyosi (aranyosi@bilkent.edu.tr)