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Philosophy | Review of Philosophy and Psychology - incl. option to publish open access (Societies)

Review of Philosophy and Psychology

Review of Philosophy and Psychology

Editor-in-Chief: Paul Egré
Executive Editors: R. Casati; C. Heintz; D. Taraborelli; F. de Vignemont

ISSN: 1878-5158 (print version)
ISSN: 1878-5166 (electronic version)

Journal no. 13164

Call for Papers

The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (RPP) is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance.
RPP welcomes regular submissions as well as articles responding to a thematic call for papers. Submitted manuscripts are double-blind reviewed by a minimum of two reviewers and by the guest editors of the issue (when applicable). Manuscripts that are not within the scope of the journal and the topic of a call for papers (when applicable) may be returned to the authors without a formal review.

Regular submissions 

To submit a manuscript for consideration in the Review of Philosophy and Psychology, please follow this link and select "regular article":

Thematic issues 

To submit a manuscript for consideration in a thematic issue of the RPP, please follow this link and select the relevant call for papers.

Issue proposals 

The Review of Philosophy and Psychology welcomes proposals for guest-edited thematic issues. Proposals are evaluated for their timeliness, relevance to the scope and readership of the RPP, feasibility, and overall scientific quality. Issue proposals should be submitted for consideration to the editor: Paul Egré, paul.egre@ens.fr

Call for Papers : Pictorial and Spatial Representation 

CALL FOR PAPERS
Pictorial and Spatial Representation
Special issue of the Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Guest editors: Valeria Giardino and Gabriel Greenberg
Deadline for submissions: 15 October 2013
The Theme
Pictorial and spatial representation play an essential role in a vast range of human communication and reasoning, exemplified by the widespread use of diagrams, maps, pictures, iconic gestures, comics, and film.
In this special issue of the Review of Philosophy and Psychology, we seek to bring together work from philosophy and cognitive science (including psychology, linguistics, and computer science) that breaks new ground in the study of spatial representation generally. Recent developments in these fields set the stage for new and exciting perspectives on this poorly understood, but philosophically and scientifically central subject matter.
The primary subject of this special issue is the public use of pictorial and spatial representations, including uses in a variety of functional roles, such as communication, externalized reasoning and proof, planning, and navigation. We will exclude research on the more familiar subject of spatial cognition, including perception and mental imagery, except insofar as it is related to public representational phenomena. We encourage submissions which pinpoint specific media, but which also address fundamental semantic concepts like content, veridicality, and validity as they apply to the variety of spatial representations. In addition, we welcome contributions which draw connections between contemporary philosophical and scientific research, as well as work which fosters rigorous engagement with empirical results and formal methods.
Potential articles might discuss:
• The analysis of diagrams, pictures, or maps in terms of:
o Syntax, semantics, or pragmatics;
o Content, reference, or veridicality;
o Validity, reasoning, or proof.
• The cognitive, communicative, and practical functions of spatial representations (including pictorial representations).
• Taxonomies of spatial representations.
• The difference between spatial representations and linguistic representation.
• The relationship between cognition or perception and spatial representation.
Invited Authors
To be announced
Important Dates
Submission deadline: 15 October 2013
Target publication date: 31 March 2014
How to submit
Prospective authors should register at: www.editorialmanager.com/ropp to obtain a login and select Pictorial and Spatial Representation as the article type. Manuscripts should be approximately 8,000 words and conform to the author guidelines available on the journal's website.
About the journal
The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (ISSN: 1878-5158; eISSN: 1878-5166) is a peer-reviewed journal, published quarterly by Springer, which focuses on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The journal’s aim is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioural and social sciences. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for papers.
Contact
For any queries, please email the guest editors: valeria.giardino@gmail.com and gabriel.greenberg@gmail.com

Call for Papers : Mental Actions and Mental Agency  

Special Issue of the Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Guest Editors: Anika Fiebich, and John Michael
Deadline for Submissions: February 1st 2014
In recent decades, mental actions have been discussed intensively in the scientific debate on intentional actions. Within this debate ‘mental agency’ has been defined as the capacity to bring about specific mental states through one’s own mental processes. In this sense, typical mental actions include recalling something, forming a judgment, solving a problem and making an action plan.
Most discussions of mental action have so far focused on establishing it as an interesting and legitimate category and addressing fundamental conceptual issues that it raises. Building upon this foundational work, the present special issue aims to bring together attempts to make use of the notion of mental action as a theoretical tool, i.e. in conceptualizing neglected types or aspects of intentional action and action preparation, in theorizing about empirical findings, in generating new questions for empirical research.
Aspects of mental actions and mental agency include (but are not restricted to):
• Typology of Mental Action. Are there types of action that have not yet been discussed in the literature and which might be illuminated by conceptualizing them as mental actions (e.g. forming the intention not to act, ‘mind-wandering’ while in a resting state)?
• Intentional Structure. Are mental actions accompanied by an intention to (mentally) act? What is the intentional structure of mental agency? Is there a sense of agency for mental acts? If so, how is it constituted and (how) does it differ depending on whether the mental acts in question precede intentions to act or intentions to not to act?
• Action preparation. What role does mental agency play for the preparation of bodily actions? (How) can the notion of mental agency assist us in conceptualizing novel findings from neuroscience or psychology (e.g., Aaron Schurger’s and colleagues challenging follow-up study of the Libet-experiment)? How can empirical research enrich our understanding of mental agency and mental preparations of bodily actions?
• Mental acts in groups. What are the peculiarities of mental acts performed in groups such as group reasoning? What is mental agency in groups? Does mental agency in groups presuppose the assumption of some kind of super-agent?
Invited Contributors:
Shaun Gallagher (University of Memphis)
Joelle Proust (IJN Paris)
Aaron Schurger (INSERM), and Sebo Uithol (University of Parma)
Word limit: 8000 words
Deadline for submissions: February 1st 2014
Publication is expected in September 2014
How to submit
Prospective authors should register at: www.editorialmanager.com/ropp to obtain a login and select Mental Actions and Mental Agency as the article type. Manuscripts should be approximately 8,000 words and conform to the author guidelines available on the journal's website.
About the journal
The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (ISSN: 1878-5158; eISSN: 1878-5166) is a peer-reviewed journal, published quarterly by Springer, which focuses on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The journal’s aim is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioural and social sciences. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for papers.
Contact
For any queries, please email the guest editors: anifiebich@gmail.com and johnmichaelaarhus@gmail.com

Call for Papers : Cognitive Penetration of Perception  

Special Issue of the Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Guest Editors: Zoe Jenkin and Susanna Siegel
Deadline for Submission: November 1, 2013
Invited Authors:
Professor Gary Lupyan, Psychology, The University of Wisconsin-Madison
Professor Reginald Adams, Psychology, Pennsylvania State University
--
The Theme:
A thirsty nomad, wandering across the Sahara, looks ahead and seems to see an oasis. It seems natural to explain this hallucination by appealing to her desire for water. If this is the case, our perceptual experiences are not always primarily input-driven. Psychological states such as beliefs, expectations, moods, desires, emotions, fears, as well as an individual’s conceptual repertoire, can influence the contents or character of perception.
This special issue will examine how perception interacts with other psychological states, and implications of this interaction for epistemology and the contents of perception. The issue will have a paper-reply format, with invited commentaries on the selected articles. Contributions from philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience are all welcome, so long as they address any of the following questions:
Does cognitive penetration of perception occur? Which definitions of cognitive penetration are explanatorily the most useful? What are the best ways to distinguish it from perceptual learning? Which aspects of the sensory modalities are subject to cognitive influence? Is there cognitive penetration of both conscious perceptual experience and perceptual information processing? Is any form of modularism about perceptual processing correct?
If cognitive penetration does occur, what are the limits of its influence, and what kind of information can be perceptually learned? Can cognitive states affect all the sensory modalities? Can they affect the perception of both lower-level properties (such as shape and color) and higher-level properties (such as causation and natural kinds)? What kinds of psychological states can affect perceptual states? How pervasive is cognitive penetration? If it happens sometimes, but not other times, what determines whether it occurs?
If cognitive penetration does occur, how does it work? In what ways can beliefs, desires, motivations, fears, suspicions, or emotions influence perception? Do these states directly interfere with perceptual processing, or do they affect perceptual experience through a mediating state, such as a mental image, or through attention? Can the influence of prior knowledge on perception be successfully modeled using a Bayesian approach? Can Bayesian frameworks shed any light on the architecture of perception itself, apart from providing a model of it?
--
How to submit
Prospective authors should register at: www.editorialmanager.com/ropp to obtain a login and select Cognitive Penetration of Perception as the article type. Manuscripts should be approximately 6,000 words and conform to the author guidelines available on the journal's website.
About the journal:
The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (ISSN: 1878-5158; eISSN: 1878-5166) is a peer-reviewed journal, published quarterly by Springer, which focuses on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The journal’s aim is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioral and social sciences. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for papers.
Contact: For any queries, please email the guest editors:
Zoe.L.Jenkin@gmail.com and SSiegel@fas.harvard.edu

Call for Papers : Mental Files 

Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Call for papers:
Mental Files
The concept of a mental file, introduced in the late sixties, has been used to theorize about a wide range of topics in the philosophy of mind and language, from the referential use of definite descriptions or the cognitive significance of identity statements, to the problem of cognitive dynamics and the nature of singular thought. In the seventies, neighbouring notions were introduced in linguistics to deal with definiteness, anaphora, and information structure. Shortly thereafter, object-files were postulated in cognitive psychology, first as part of models of mid-level object-directed attention in adults, then in theories of cognitive development, based on the hypothesized continuity of a core system of object-file representation from infancy to adulthood. It is not unreasonable to hope that researchers who invoke mental files in various disciplines are zeroing in on a psychological natural kind. Still, there are important differences between the various uses to which the notion is put, and more empirical and conceptual work has to be done before any unification can be attempted.
The main goal of this special issue is to bring together philosophers, psychologists and linguists in order to advance our understanding of mental files, as that notion is used in philosophy and throughout the cognitive sciences. We encourage submissions focusing on the conceptual foundations of the mental file framework, as well as submissions exploring the connections between appeal to mental files in philosophy and in empirical disciplines. Scientific work addressing foundational issues and philosophical work engaging in detail with recent scientific research is particularly welcome. All submissions should aim towards being as accessible as possible to a wide, multidisciplinary audience. Among the possible topics to be addressed are the following:
 Which phenomena in perceptual and developmental psychology are best explained by files?
 Are there different types of files? Are some files ‘descriptive’, and others ‘demonstrative’ or ‘indexical’?
 Do we have specific files for the representation of kinds or sorts? For events, places or times? For the self?
 Does the file model accurately describe our cognitive architecture? Does neuroscientific evidence support this model? How does it relate to others, such as the language of thought hypothesis, etc.?
 How is our mental filing system or mental ‘encyclopedia’ organized and how does it function? What formal tools (e.g., graphs) are appropriate for modeling its operations?
 Which linguistic phenomena can be better understood thanks to files? Are files needed to explain information structure, anaphora and semantic coordination, definiteness, discourse reference?
 How does the postulation of files contribute to the theory of content? Should modes of presentation be conceived of as mental files? Do files satisfy various constraints on different types of content, e.g., transparency, publicity, generality?
Guest editors
Michael Murez (Institut Jean-Nicod)
François Recanati (Institut Jean-Nicod)
Guest authors
Samuel Cumming (Philosophy, UCLA)
Hans Kamp (Linguistics, University of Stuttgart)
Ágnes Kovács (Psychology, CEU Budapest)
Josef Perner (Psychology, University of Salzburg)
Mark Richard (Philosophy, Harvard University)
Schedule
Submission deadline: March 31, 2014
Target publication date: December 31, 2014
How to submit
Prospective authors should register at: www.editorialmanager.com/ropp to obtain a login and select Mental Files as the article type. Manuscripts should be no longer than 8,000 words and conform to the author guidelines available on the journal's website.
About the journal
The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (ISSN: 1878-5158; eISSN: 1878-5166) is a peer-reviewed journal, published quarterly by Springer, which focuses on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The journal’s aim is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioral and social sciences. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for papers.
Contact
For any queries or declaration of intention, please email the guest editors: michael.murez@gmail.com and recanati@ens.fr

Call for Papers : Voices and Thoughts in Psychosis 

Voices and Thoughts in Psychosis
Special Issue of the Review of Philosophy and Psychology
Auditory-verbal hallucinations (AVHs), namely, hearing voices in the absence of a speaker, are a common symptom of psychosis affecting approximately 75 percent of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. By far the most popular approach in recent decades has been to explain AVH in terms of a problem with self-monitoring, whereby self-produced phenomena are badly monitored and therefore misattributed to an external source.
Contemporary research in voice hearing is starting to depart from this orthodoxy in exciting ways. One source of change comes from the fact that theorists in psychology and philosophy have been interacting more with clinicians, patients and even activists, and thereby recognising the complexity and heterogeneity of voice hearing.
One upshot of this complexity is that it raises questions about the difference between voice hearing and thoughts that feel inserted or alien in some way. Since some voices are reported as “soundless” or “very much like thoughts”, it is by no means clear that the distinction simply depends on presence of auditory phenomenology. More work needs to be done on the relationship between AVH and thought insertion. The self-monitoring approach has tended to simply view both as misattributed inner speech.
The purpose of this special issue is to unite philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists in order to further our understanding of voice hearing and thought insertion. We particularly welcome submissions that seek to clarify or question the difference between AVH and thought insertion. Potential issues to be addressed include but are not restricted to:
 The relationship between AVH and thought insertion
 The relationship between inner speech and thought
 What AVH and/or thought insertion can tell us about audition and/or thought
 Overlooked phenomenological aspects of voice-hearing and/or thought insertion
 The meaning of “a voice” in subjective reports of “hearing a voice”
 The role of communicative content in AVH and/or thought insertion
 What clinical and non-clinical variations in AVH can tell us about voices and thoughts in psychosis
 New or integrative models of voice-hearing and/or thought insertion
 Mechanisms or subjective grounds underpinning the ownership of thoughts/voices
 Implications of thought insertion and AVH for epistemological issues like self-knowledge and privileged access
 The relationship between inserted thoughts, norms of rationality, and theories of delusion
Guest Editors
Sam Wilkinson (Durham University)
Ben Alderson-Day (Durham University)
Invited Contributors
Johanna Badcock (University of Western Australia)
Frank Larøi (University of Liege)
Johannes Roessler (University of Warwick)
Schedule
Submission Deadline: October 17, 2014
How to submit
Prospective authors should register at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/ropp to obtain a login and select "Voices and Thoughts in Psychosis" as an article type. Manuscripts should be approximately 8,000 words. Submissions should follow the author guidelines available on the journal's website. About the journal The Review of Philosophy and Psychology (ISSN: 1878-5158; eISSN: 1878-5166) is a peer reviewed journal published quarterly by Springer and focusing on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science. The aim of the journal is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioural and social sciences. The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for paper. Contact For any queries, please email the guest editors:
sam.wilkinson@durham.ac.uk
benjamin.alderson-day@durham.ac.uk

 

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    The Review of Philosophy and Psychology is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on philosophical and foundational issues in cognitive science.

    The aim of the journal is to provide a forum for discussion on topics of mutual interest to philosophers and psychologists and to foster interdisciplinary research at the crossroads of philosophy and the sciences of the mind, including the neural, behavioural and social sciences.

    The journal publishes theoretical works grounded in empirical research as well as empirical articles on issues of philosophical relevance. It includes thematic issues featuring invited contributions from leading authors together with articles answering a call for papers.

    The Review of Philosophy and Psychology is published quarterly and is hosted at the Jean Nicod Institute, a research centre of the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. It was formerly published as the "European Review of Philosophy" by CSLI Publications, Stanford.

  • Open Choice - Your Way to Open Access
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  • Call for papers: Pain and Pleasure (pdf,...
  • Call for papers: Pictorial and Spatial R...
  • Call for papers: Cognitive Penetration o...
  • Call for papers: Mental Actions and Ment...
  • Call for papers: Mental Files (pdf, 82 k...
  • Call for papers: Voices and Thoughts in ...
  • Guidelines for Guest Editors (pdf, 414 k...
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