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Philosophy | Dao Companion to Korean Confucian Philosophy

Dao Companion to Korean Confucian Philosophy

Ro, Young-chan (Ed.)

2014, Approx. 500 p.

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  • About this book

  • Deals with the historical, social, political, philosophical and spiritual dimensions of Korean Confucianism, arguably the most influential intellectual tradition, ethical and religious practice, and political-ideological system in Korea Surveys the most influential Korean Confucian scholars discussing their philosophical significance in relation to one of the most fundamental Neo-Confucian discourses, namely the "li" (principle) and "qi" (material force) debates

This volume is the first comprehensive and in-depth discussion written in English of the Confucian tradition in the context of the intellectual history of Korea. It deals with the historical, social, political, philosophical and spiritual dimensions of Korean Confucianism, arguably the most influential intellectual tradition, ethical and religious practice, and political-ideological system in Korea. This volume analyzes the unique aspects of the Korean development of the Confucian tradition by examining the role of Confucianism as the ruling ideology of the Choson Dynasty (1302-1910). It investigates Confucianism’s social and cultural construction, and intellectual foundation in highlighting the Korean achievement of the Neo-Confucian discussion on "human nature and its principle" in light of the Chinese Neo-Confucian development. The volume also surveys the most influential Korean Confucian scholars discussing their philosophical significance in relation to one of the most fundamental Neo-Confucian discourses, namely the li (principle) and qi (material force) debates, to elucidate how metaphysical theories shaped the socio-political factions of the Choson Dynasty. Furthermore, issues concerning the relationship between Confucianism and Buddhism and other native traditional belief systems are also included in this volume. The volume explores the Confucian confrontation with modernity, encounter with the "Western Learning" including Western science and Catholicism, and the Confucian struggle with modernity in dealing with issues such as democracy, human rights, and gender in modern Korea. Individual contributors of this volume are either well established senior scholars or promising young scholars in the field.

Content Level » Research

Keywords » AAR - Chinese philosophy - Confucian philosophy - Confucianism - Dao - Daoism - Korean confucian philosophy - Tao - Taoism

Related subjects » Philosophy - Religious Studies

Table of contents 

Introduction.- 1. A Historical Overview of Korean Confucianism; Don Baker.- 2. Confucian Philosophy as the Ideological Foundation of the Choson Dynasty: Chong Tojon; Chai-sik Chung.- 3. Intellectual Philosophical Formation of the Choson Dynasty: Kwon Kun, Haryun, Yu Sungjo; Hongkyung Kim.- 4. Philosophical Movement of Sarimp’a or the School of Private Studies: Kil Jae, Cho Kwangjo, Kim Sisup; Oaksook Kim.- 5. The Rise of Qi monism and So Kyongdok; Wonsuk Chang.- 6. Yi T’oegye: Korean Achievement of Neo-Confucian Philosophy; Mike Kalton.- 7. Yi Yulgok: Korean Approach to Neo-Confucian Philosophical Issues; Young-chan Ro.- 8. The Korean Development of the Neo Confucian "Four-Seven Debate"; Ed Chung.- 9. Critical Appraisal of T’oegye and Yulgok: Korean Contribution to the Neo-Confucian Philosophical discourse; Sa-Soon Youn.- 10. The Horak Debate concerning Human Nature of the Nature of all Other Beings: Yi Kan, Han Wonjin; Ae Hee Yi.- 11. Chung Tasan: Re-formation of Korean Neo-Confucianism; Mark Setton.- 12. Sirhak or the Practical Learning School in Korea: Yi Sukwang, Yu Songwon, Yi Ik Pak Chiwon, Pak Chaega; Hyung-jo Han.- 13. The Late Choson Confucianism and Western Learning. and Catholicism: Interaction and Conflict; Jang-tae Keum.- 14. The Yangming School in Korea: Ch’oe Myonggil, Chong Chaedu, Pak Unsik, Chong Inbo; Injae Chung.- 15. Confucian Orthodoxy and Revival of the Li School: Yi Hangno; Chai-sik Chung.- 16. Song Siyol and Revival of the Qi School; Shin-Hwan Kwak.- 17. Confucianism and Social Values in Modern Korea; Seung Hwan Lee.- 18. Women and Confucianism in Korea; Eun Suun Lee.- 19. Confucianism and Shamanism in Korea; Boudewijn C.A. Walraven.- Index.

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