Logo - springer
Slogan - springer

Life Sciences | Arthropod-Plant Interactions - Virtual Issue

Arthropod-Plant Interactions - Virtual Issue

We are very pleased to inform you that the first Virtual Issue of Arthropod-Plant Interactions: POLLINATION ECOLOGY is available as a special service for you.

Our Virtual Issues are compiled in close collaboration with the Editor-in-Chief Heikki M.T. Hokkanen and focus on cutting-edge topics. They present key articles which have been published in the journal over the course of the last years.

You are invited to take advantage of a special free trial access offer today.

Enjoy - and spread the word!

VIRTUAL ISSUE Number 1: POLLINATION ECOLOGY 

Floral epidermal structure and flower orientation: getting to grips with awkward flowers 

December 2011, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 279-285

Sean A. Rands, Beverley J. Glover, Heather M. Whitney

Hawkmoths’ innate flower preferences: a potential selective force on floral biomechanics 

December 2011, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 263-268

Jordanna D. H. Sprayberry, Marie Suver

Induced mutations affecting pollinator choice in Mimulus lewisii (Phrymaceae) 

September 2011, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 235-244

Christina R. Owen, H. D. Bradshaw

Honey bee handling behaviour on the papilionate flower of Robinia pseudoacacia L. 

February 2013, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 119-124

Manuela Giovanetti, Giovanna Aronne

Foraging activity of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L.) on Bt-expressing eggplants 

September 2011, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 255-261

Salvatore Arpaia, Antonio De Cristofaro, Emilio Guerrieri, et al.

The most effective pollinator revisited: pollen dynamics in a spring-flowering herb 

June 2013, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 315-322, Open Access

Marcin Zych, Jan Goldstein, Katarzyna Roguz, Małgorzata Stpiczyńska

Relative contributions to seed production by floral visitors of slickspot peppergrass, Lepidium papilliferum (Brassicaceae) 

December 2011, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 379-389

Ian C. Robertson, Hollie Leavitt

Investigating the relationship between pollination strategies and the size-advantage model in zoophilous plants using the reproductive biology of Arum cylindraceum and other European Arum species as case studies 

March 2012, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 35-44

Natacha Revel, Nadir Alvarez, Marc Gibernau, Anahí Espíndola

Flower-visiting insect communities on two closely related Rhododendron species flowering in different seasons 

September 2012, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 333-344

Shinji Sugiura

Solitary and social bees as pollinators of Wahlenbergia (Campanulaceae): single-visit effectiveness, overnight sheltering and responses to flower colour 

March 2012, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 1-14

Megan R. Welsford, Steven D. Johnson

Melliferous potential of Brassica napus L. subsp. napus (Cruciferae) 

June 2013, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 323-333

Nebojša Nedić, Marina Mačukanović-Jocić, Dragana Rančić,
Bjørn Rørslett, Ivan Šoštarić, Zora Dajić Stevanović, Mića Mladenović

How long to stay on a plant: the response of bumblebees to encountered nectar levels 

June 2012, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 315-325

Hans Dreisig

The pollen of Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. is toxic to honeybees (Apis mellifera) 

April 2013

Igor Ricardo Batista Vieira de Melo, Mateus Cardoso da Costa Lages, Diego Passos dos Santos, Patrício Borges Maracajá, Rodrigo Alboim de Paiva Fernandes Rodrigues, Benito Soto-Blanco

Does bee or wasp mimicry by orchid flowers also deter herbivores? 

September 2012, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 327-332

Simcha Lev-Yadun, Gidi Ne’eman

Why ant pollination is rare: new evidence and implications of the antibiotic hypothesis 

December 2012, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 561-569

Emily M. Dutton, Megan E. Frederickson

Editorial: Pollination ecology in focus 

Heikki M. T. Hokkanen, Editor-in-Chief

Among arthropod-plant interactions, the relationship between flowering plants and pollinating insects is one of the most fascinating. Insects appeared on Earth about 350 million years ago, and the first flowering plants some 130 million years ago. For a long time, flowers were wind-pollinated, until insects discovered pollen as a suitable food source, and the intricate relationships between plants and pollinators started to evolve. As a result, today about 80% of flowering plants require insect pollination, and these pollination systems offer an endless arena for researchers to discover ecological and evolutionary patters that have led to an amazing diversity of arrangements between plants and their pollinating insects.
Almost every issue of Arthropod-Plant Interactions (APIS) has one or several pollination-related articles, as this is a highly active research area of growing importance. APIS is now proud to launch its first Virtual Special Issue, dedicated to this topic. We selected 15 articles published in APIS during the past two years, demonstrating the scientific advances related to questions of plants and their pollinators. With this virtual special issue we want to encourage researchers to continue supporting us and help in making APIS even stronger in this area in the future.
Several of the selected articles for this Special Issue deal with fundamental ecological questions, trying to unravel the patterns we observe in pollination ecology. These include studies on flower epidermal structure, orientation, movement, and other properties, in order to relate these features to the ability of pollinators to handle different types of flowers and to be successful pollinators on them (Rands et al., 2011; Sprayberry and Suver, 2011; Owen and Bradshaw, 2011; Revel et al., 2012, Giovanetti and Aronne, 2013). Another major set of articles deals with specific plants, or types of plants and their pollinators, and pollination efficiency (Robertson and Leavitt, 2011; Arpaia et al., 2012; Sugiura, 2012; Welsford and Johnson, 2012; Zych et al., 2013), while some study the quantity of reward available and the levels of pollinator visits (Dreisig, 2012; Nedic et al., 2013).
The final three articles, demonstrating the versatility of pollination-related articles in APIS, describe how some plants select their pollinators by deterring generalist pollinators such as the honey bee via production of toxic pollen (de Melo et al., 2013), and that some flowers while mimicking bees or wasps for attracting pollinators, also reduce herbivory by the same mechanism (Lev-Yadun and Ne’eman, 2012). In the final paper, Dutton and Frederickson (2012) describe why ants rarely serve as pollinators, although they often are among the most numerous flower visitors.
This Virtual Special Issue demonstrates the commitment of APIS to promote this important area of research. We welcome further high-quality manuscripts from the scientific community to help us achieve rapidly a more thorough understanding of pollinators and pollination ecology – needed in order to adequately address the looming ‘pollinator crisis’.

References 

Arpaia, S., De Cristofaro, A., Guerrieri, E., Bossi, S., Cellini, F., Di Leo, G.M., Germinara, G.S., Iodice, L., Maffei, M.E., Petrozza, A., Sasso, R. and Vitagliano, S. 2011. Foraging activity of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L.) on Bt-expressing eggplants. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 5: 255-261.
de Melo I.R.B.V., da Costa Lages M.C., dos Santos D.P., Maracajá P.B., de Rodrigues R.A.P.F. and Soto-Blanco B. 2013. The pollen of Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. is toxic to honeybees Apis mellifera. Arthropod-Plant Interactions (in press), DOI 10.1007/s11829-013-9254-3.
Dreisig, H. , 2012. How long to stay on a plant: the response of bumblebees to encountered nectar levels. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 315-325.
Dutton, E.M. and Frederickson, M.E. 2012. Why ant pollination is rare: new evidence and implications of the antibiotic hypothesis. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 561-569.
Giovanetti, M. and Aronne, G. 2013. Honey bee handling behaviour on the papilionate flower of Robinia pseudoacacia L. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 7: 119-124.
Lev-Yadun, S. and Ne’eman, G. 2012. Does bee or wasp mimicry by orchid flowers also deter herbivores? Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 327-332.
Nedic, N., Macukanovic-Jocic, M., Rančić, D., Rørslett, B., Šoštaric, I., Stevanovic, Z. and Mladenovic, M. 2013. Melliferous potential of Brassica napus L. subsp. napus (Cruciferae). Arthropod-Plant Interactions 7: 323-333.
Owen, C.R. and Bradshaw, H.D. 2011. Induced mutations affecting pollinator choice in Mimulus lewisii (Phrymaceae). Arthropod-Plant Interactions 5: 235-244.
Rands, S., Glover, B. and Whitney, H. 2011. Floral epidermal structure and flower orientation: getting to grips with awkward flowers. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 5: 279 – 285.
Revel, N., Alvarez, N., Gibernau, M. and Espindola, A. 2012. Investigating the relationship between pollination strategies and the size-advantage model in zoophilous plants using the reproductive biology of Arum cylindraceum and other European Arum species as case studies. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 35-44.
Robertson, I.C. and Leavitt, H. 2011. Relative contributions to seed production by floral visitors of slickspot peppergrass, Lepidium papilliferum (Brassicaceae). Arthropod-Plant Interactions 5: 379-389.
Sprayberry, H.D.H. and Suver, M. 2011. Hawkmoths’ innate flower preferences: a potential selective force on floral biomechanics. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 5:263-268.
Sugiura, S. 2012. Flower-visiting insect communities on two closely related Rhododendron species flowering in different seasons. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 333-344.
Welsford, M. and Johnson, S.D. 2012. Solitary and social bees as pollinators of Wahlenbergia (Campanulaceae): single-visit effectiveness, overnight sheltering and responses to flower colour. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 6: 1-14.
Zych, M., Goldstein J., Roguz, K. and Stpiczynska, M. 2013. The most effective pollinator revisited: pollen dynamics in a spring-flowering herb. Arthropod-Plant Interactions 7: 315-322.

VIRTUAL ISSUE Number 2: MICROBE-MEDIATED ARTHROPOD-PLANT INTERACTIONS