Logo - springer
Slogan - springer

Life Sciences - Ecology | Dynamics of Coral Communities

Dynamics of Coral Communities

Karlson, R.H.

1999, X, 250 p.

Available Formats:
Hardcover
Information

Hardcover version

You can pay for Springer Books with Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Paypal.

Standard shipping is free of charge for individual customers.

 
$259.00

(net) price for USA

ISBN 978-0-412-79550-3

free shipping for individuals worldwide

usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days


add to marked items

Softcover
Information

Softcover (also known as softback) version.

You can pay for Springer Books with Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Paypal.

Standard shipping is free of charge for individual customers.

 
$109.00

(net) price for USA

ISBN 978-1-4020-1046-0

free shipping for individuals worldwide

usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days


add to marked items

Coral communities are among the most fascinating of all biotic assemblages on earth. It is their rich diversity and the strong biological interactions which characterize these communities that provides the focus for this book. Here I describe patterns of diversity, species interactions, and community organization as well as the processes which influence these structural attributes. Although this treatment of the subject will to some degree blend evolutionary and ecological phenomena, I am primarily interested in the dynamic properties of living coral communities. Hence, such processes as succession, competition, predation, herbivory, and disturbances will be emphasized in ecological terms, but not to the exclusion of evolutionary considerations. The former influence the maintenance of diversity in coral communities and local distribution and abundance patterns. The latter deal primarily with the origins of diversity, adaptations to the local environment, biogeographic distributions, and longevity in the fossil record. With the recent resurgence of interest in historical and large-scale geographical effects on the local diversity of ecological communities, ecological and evolutionary perspectives are beginning to be integrated into our understanding of community organization and dynamics. Hence, a synthesis of these perspectives is attempted in the final chapter of this book. This effort emerges as a consequence of academic experiences, research interests, and the strong influence of several individuals. My first exposure to ecology occurred at Pomona College where three faculty members guided my early explorations into this subject.

Content Level » Research

Related subjects » Ecology - Evolutionary & Developmental Biology

Table of contents 

Preface. 1: Introduction. 1.1. Ecological communities, guilds, assemblages and webs. 1.2. Taxonomic and trophic constraints. 1.3. Scale-dependent dynamics. 1.4. Marine epibenthic communities. 1.5. Overview. 2: Diversity. 2.1. Origins of diversity. 2.2. Patterns of coral diversity. 2.3. Diversity of non-coral taxa. 2.4. Overview. 3: Stability. 3.1. What is stability? 3.2. Are stability and diversity related? 3.3. Keystone species. 3.4. Transient dynamics of nonequilibrial systems. 3.5. Overview. 4: Succession. 4.1. Successional mechanisms on ecological time scales. 4.2. Succession in coral communities. 4.3. Overview. 5: Interspecific competition. 5.1. General considerations. 5.2. Interspecific competition in coral communities. 5.3. Overview. 6: Consumer-resource interactions. 6.1. Coupled populations, food webs, and interactive community processes. 6.2. Food-web interactions of coral reef fishes: an example. 6.3. Plant-herbivore interactions in coral communities. 6.4. Predator-prey interactions in coral communities. 6.5. Overview. 7: Disturbance. 7.1. Disturbance and species coexistence. 7.2. Disturbances to coral communities: a potpourri. 7.3. Do disturbances promote species coexistence? 7.4. Overview. 8: Large-scale perspectives. 8.1. General considerations. 8.2. Evidence from coral communities. 8.3. Middle ground. 8.4. Overview. 9: Integration across scales. 9.1. The local environment. 9.2. The regional setting and cross-scale linkage. 9.3. A biogeographic context for coral community ecology. 9.4. Closing comments. References. Subject Index.

Popular Content within this publication 

 

Articles

Services for this book

New Book Alert

Get alerted on new Springer publications in the subject area of Freshwater & Marine Ecology.