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Life Sciences | Environmental Change and Malaria Risk - Global and Local Implications

Environmental Change and Malaria Risk

Global and Local Implications

Takken, Willem, Martens, Pim, Bogers, Robert J. (Eds.)

2005, XXII, 138 p.

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  • About this book

In the past decade global change caused mainly by climate change has been at the forefront of world news. It has become a standard item on the agendas of political leaders as fears grown of the economic costs.

Climate change is expected to impact heavily on human and animal health because of disturbance of ecological equilibriums and more favorable conditions for disease agents. Vector-borne diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis and dengue will benefit particularly from the predicted changes.

This book is the reflection of a workshop in which the potential impact of global change on malaria and other vector-borne diseases was discussed from different angles. The workshop brought together a series of leading scientists in the field of malaria and global change to discuss the likelihood of changes in disease risk with respect to the scale of the predicted changes.

It was clear that environmental change, more than climate change, is the driving force behind the observed changes. The rapid spread of blue tongue, another highly infectious vector-borne disease, illustrates what might happen if the world looks on unguarded.

Content Level » Research

Keywords » Scale - assessment - climate change - ecology - environment - environmental change

Related subjects » Atmospheric Sciences - Ecology - Global Change - Climate Change - Life Sciences - Public Health

Table of contents 

Preface and acknowledgments Colour pages 1. Introduction; Willem Takken and Pim Martens (The Netherlands).- 2. Climate change and malaria risk: complexity and scaling; Pim Martens (The Netherlands) and Chris Thomas (UK).- 3. Global environmental change and health: integrating knowledge from natural, socioeconomic and medical sciences; Rik Leemans (The Netherlands).- 4. Application of geographic information systems to the study of the ecology of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases; John E. Gimnig, Allen W. Hightower and William A. Hawley (USA).- 5. A model structure for estimating malaria risk; M.B. Hoshen and A.P.Morse (UK).- 6. Rapid assessment of malaria risk using entomological techniques: taking an epidemiological snapshot; P.F. Billingsley (UK), J.D. Charlwood (Denmark) and B.G.J. Knols (Austria, The Netherlands).- 7. Malaria risk in the highlands of western Kenya: an entomological perspective; C.J.M. Koenraadt (The Netherlands) and A.K. Githeko (Kenya).- 8. Malaria risk scenarios for Kisumu, Kenya: blending qualitative and quantitative information; Michael van Lieshout (The Netherlands).- 9. INDEPTH Network: a viable platform for the assessment omalaria risk in developing countries; Osman Sankoh and Fred Binka (Ghana).- 10. Challenges for dengue control in Brazil: overview of socioeconomic and environmental factors associated with virus circulation; Paulo de Tarso R. Vilarinhos (Brazil).- 11. Effects of environmental change on malaria in the Amazon region of Brazil; Willem Takken (The Netherlands), Paulo de Tarso R. Vilarinhos (Brazil), Petra Schneider (The Netherlands) and Fatima dos Santos (Brazil).- 12. Bluetongue in the Mediterranean: prediction of risk in space and time; B.V. Purse, P.S. Mellor and M. Baylis (UK).- 13. Discussion and epilogue; Pim Martens and Willem Takken (The Netherlands).- List of participants

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