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International Women’s Day | International Women's Day

Inspiring Change is this year’s United Nation’s theme for International Women’s Day, celebrated annually on March 8. The day is set aside to “celebrate the social, political and economic achievements of women while focusing world attention on areas requiring further action.”
Springer is joining the celebration by featuring interviews with our female Editors-in-Chief, along with free access to a recent issue from their journal and handpicked content on the topic of women in science, women Nobel Prize winners and more!
"We are thrilled with the overwhelming and positive response from our female Editors-in-Chief for International Women’s Day, and wish to thank all participating editors. It’s gratifying to have women heading up so many of our journals. Their interviews are insightful and inspiring, and I hope that their evident hard work, dedication, and success will spur future generations of female researchers to join the scientific community.” -Carolyn J. Honour, Executive Vice President: Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Springer (pictured above).
For your convenience, we have listed all interviews and associated content by subject area. Please note that all free access offers end April 8, 2014.

BUSINESS and ECONOMICS

A Thank You to Our Participating Editors 

We thank Dr. Janet Kohlhase, Dr. Kathryn Graddy, Dr. Brigitte Preissl, Dr. Anne P. Villamil, Dr. Helena Alves, and Dr. Ulrike Leopold-Wildburger for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

ECONOMICS: Dr. Kathryn Graddy, Editor, Journal of Cultural Economics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I chose economics because I was good at math AND I enjoyed history and the humanities. I perceived it as a way to combine these subjects. My concentrations for my undergraduate degree had been math and Russian. Although I had studied very little economics until graduate school, my strong math background was good preparation.
I chose my subfield of industrial organization because the course material is fascinating. I enjoy thinking about questions regarding firms, why they exist, and specifically how they choose prices. I still enjoy this research, and I have especially enjoyed extending my knowledge of markets to the art market. If I have any advice for women starting out, it is to follow your specific interests without having a lot of preconceptions about what they might be.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
The women that I have had the most contact with and admire very much have been the backbone of the economics departments of which I have been a member. At Brandeis this has been Rachel McCulloch and Catherine Mann, and by reputation, Anne Carter. At Oxford, Margaret Stevens was both a great colleague and friend. These women are very intelligent, meticulous in their work and administration, and highly ethical. They are also always willing to step up and volunteer.
In the field of the economics of the arts, the woman that I admire the most is Francoise Behamou, who is the current president of the Association of Cultural Economists International and who is very influential in the realm of arts policy in France. I admire her because she has been able to make a wide impact on arts policy. She has been able to step out of the academic realm and achieve wider influence.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We are working on a special issue on the economics of movies that will come out in January, with papers published online in the fall. We started planning this issue last year, and it will be exciting and fulfilling when it finally comes out. For the future, we have discussed starting a selected number of issues with a note from various well-known research economists on different issue relating to the economics of the arts.

ECONOMICS: Dr. Janet Kohlhase, Co-Editor, The Annals of Regional Science 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
My fields are regional science and urban economics. I was attracted to ways of understanding the workings of the urban economy using techniques from economics and regional science. How, why, and the consequences of economic activity varying over space were my big questions.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I drew inspiration from two women who were faculty members at the University of Pennsylvania when I was a graduate student there: Dr. Janice Madden (Regional Science) and Dr. Michelle White (Economics)
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
For 2014 we will continue to publish high-quality articles about urban and regional economies. We also are likely to publish two special issues in 2014: (1) Agent Based Models and (2) Spatial Knowledge Networks and Innovative Performance.

ECONOMICS: Dr. Brigitte Preissl, Editor-in-Chief, Intereconomics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
When I started to study economics, I wanted to understand how society works. As the mode of production, the division of labour, the distribution of goods and many other elements are constitutive to how society organises itself, this seemed to be the right choice (and for me, it still is!). When becoming the editor of two economic policy journals, I got the opportunity to learn a lot about how economic policy shapes, manipulate, and governs the way the economy works and, thus, how people live together. In addition, I am now able to choose topics that I find most relevant and that might not have gained the attention they deserve. And I can establish or promote public discourse about these issues.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
My role model is my friend Eileen Appelbaum. She is a brilliant researcher, has always worked on topics that contribute to improve the economic situation of ‘real people’, and has an excellent feeling for the political impact of economic discourse. She never stops to hint at economic and political processes that go wrong – contrary to her main stream colleagues, and she is influential with great modesty. Her contribution is not ‘innovative’ in a strict sense, but extremely relevant as she continues to search for hidden truths behind seemingly ‘rational’ economic reasoning and knows what side she stands on.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
In the next issues of Wirtschaftsdienst the monthly special sections cover the following topics: - What can we Expect from Family Policy in the newly formed coalition? - Immigration in Germany: Problems and Opportunities for the Labour Market - The 2014 Elections for the European Parliament: Democratisation through the Parliament? - The journal Intereconomics plans two Special Sections so far - The European Banking Sector after the Reforms - Migration within the EU: crisis driven, a result of EU Single Market policies, temporary or permanent?

FINANCE: Dr. Anne P. Villamil, Editor, Annals of Finance 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Many problems have economic roots. Starting out, economics seemed to be both a driver and a framework for solutions to important problems. In addition, the best individual plans can be disrupted by macroeconomic and financial shocks. I started graduate school in the 1980s and the macroeconomy was challenging: growth, inflation, and unemployment were all areas of great concern. The stakes were high and the problems were interesting.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
The proportion of women in economics was low when I started graduate school. I did my PhD at the University of Minnesota. Anne Krueger was on the faculty, and that certainly affected my decision to apply and attend. However, she left the year I arrived to become the Chief Economist at the World Bank. Minnesota was a special and inspiring place. Women accounted for 25% of my class, a very high percentage at the time. The department had a simple focus on hard work and integrity. I had the opportunity to take classes from faculty who went on to win Nobel Prizes: Hurwicz, Prescott, Sargent and Sims. The focus of these (and other) men on what did matter -- good ideas and hard work to bring ideas to fruition -- was very inspiring with no boundaries, gender or other.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
The financial crisis made clear that much work remains to be done in finance and macroeconomics, especially forging stronger links between the two areas.

MARKETING: Dr. Helena Alves, Editor-in-Chief, International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
What appealed most to me in starting in the field of public and nonprofit marketing was the fact that nonprofit and public marketing applies to organizations that have a fundamental role in society. These organizations help societies to resolve social problems and sometimes even replace governments in their duties. However, these organizations have serious difficulties in applying marketing strategies and therefore need help to understand how they can apply marketing strategies in order to become more efficient and successful. The same applies to public organizations which need, each time more, to be efficient and responsible to citizens’ needs. The International Review on public and nonprofit marketing is a journal focused on this problem and tries to publish not only research papers, but also, case studies that can help theses organizations’ managers and researchers in this area of knowledge to improve the efficiency of these organizations.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
There is a professor very concerned with this kind of problems that has always been an inspiration for me. Her name is Professor Minoo Farhangmehr , the first full professor of marketing in Portugal. A person loved by the students, admired by her colleagues and with an outstanding position around the world in the field of marketing.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
In 2014, the International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing intends to continue with its mission of spreading science related to nonprofit or public marketing. Along with the 2 normal issues we will have a special issue on social marketing. We also intend to promote research on this topic from developing countries where human rights, and specially women rights, are sometimes still disregarded.

OPERATIONS RESEARCH: Dr. Ulrike Leopold-Wildburger, Editor-in-Chief, Central European Journal of Operations Research 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
From my early age I was fascinated by numbers and later at school excited by mathematical problems. There are so many open questions one could work on forever!
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Sorry, there have not been many women colleagues around in Europe until I went to U.S. in the early 90ies. There I found several inspiring female pioneers. Nowadays, I have a sort of mentor by Marion Rauner, even though she is much younger than me.
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What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We try to do the best and want to encourage everybody to submit excellent papers from the field of Operations Research, Mathematical Economics and related topics.

Free Reads 

CHEMISTRY

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Sylvia Daunert for her generous participation in this campaign, as well as her dedication to her journal.

Dr. Sylvia Daunert, Editor, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
The multidisciplinary nature of the research was most appealing to me. I love working with scientists, physician scientists, and engineers of varied backgrounds and with different expertise because as a team we can dream up solutions and solve problems that otherwise would not be possible.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Not many women in my field when I started, but I am encouraged to see that now women are a force!
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What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
To continue increasing the visibility of Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry by keeping on publishing state-of-the-art science and technology at the interface of disciplines

Free and Recommended Reads 

Read and download articles and book chapters from and about women nobel prize winners in Chemistry (Ada E. Yonath, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Irène Joliot-Curie, and Marie Curie, née Sklodowska) and related to the field of women in Chemistry. Free access expires April 8, 2014. We have also included some book recommendations. Enjoy!

COMPUTER SCIENCE and ENGINEERING

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Gisela Susanne Bahr, Dr. Itana Maria Gimenes, and Dr. Amy Neustein for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

Dr. Gisela Susanne Bahr, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Interaction Science (A SpringerOpen Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
When I was a girl I thought that all real experts in any (!) field had to be men. Why? All I had to do was to look around to see the evidence: all chefs were men although lots of women cooked; all OB/GYNs were men although women have babies! But in the end, I realized that maybe, just maybe, my professional expertise had nothing to do with my sex but with how knowledge is so much fun and how discovery makes me tick. There continue to be a lot of weird ideas about what is appropriate for women to learn and how it is appropriate for women to use their knowledge. So what? I love the challenges in my fields of cognitive sciences and computer sciences and yes, both are dominated by men. Why it appealed to me? It was the intellectual stimulation and the fact that there is no way to find the all the answers in one lifetime. Imagine I almost missed out because of some stuffy stereotypes ;-)
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
There is more than 1 female VIPs in my life, but perhaps the most influential was a friend who I called my dissertation mother. My dissertation mentor was a brilliant man with a heart the size to match his intellect but at times he drove me absolutely crazy. We were both hard heads and there was a time when four letters words filled the air waves over “some scientific who knows what”. My dissertation mother helped me to navigate the social reality of getting my PhD, which seemed a much greater challenge than doing the research! Without her, I probably would have quit to make a point over some trivial details of a research question.
From her I learnt the art and benefit of getting along. ;-)
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
The Journal of Interaction Science (JoIS) had a super start in May 2013. We are averaging 1,800 accesses per month. What’s next ? Our goal is to grow into a well-known, highly respected journal with more publications and special issues.
There are a few things that will help us because we are different from the traditional print approach: The most important thing about Interaction Science online publishing is not only the freedom of access but the freedom of expression.
For example number 1, authors can hyperlink easily. The speed of the connectedness across articles and resources is finally approaching the brain speed! This certainly beats the old way of getting articles and references from the library or hard copy interlibrary loans. Even better, authors can connect to resources such as databases or research test-beds or stimuli that interested. Lucky JoIS readers!
For example number 2, authors can use color, animation, motion, video and sounds to communicate !!! I am using 3 exclamation marks because finally we have surpassed page count limited, black and white text as an impoverished medium for communication. Of course, media enrichment choices are no silver bullet but there are times when authors are hamstrung by print media especially in interaction science research. Isn’t it more efficient to communicate the nature of a stimulus involving interaction with video in a journal rather than verbal description alone ? All dynamic data, all change of time data benefit from media support. The Journal of Interaction Science has it.

Dr. Itana Maria Gimenes, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Software Engineering Research and Development (A SpringerOpen Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
When I was looking for a University program (1976), computers were advertised in the media (TV) as the dream machine - one that could make our lives so much easier. I was so impressed by its size and complexity that I became so curious to study and use it. It was also advertised as a profession easy to find jobs which fits to my desire of being quickly independent. It was true, at the age of 19 I had a good job and never stopped working.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I met several men and women that were great colleagues, so it is difficult to say. Not any particular woman; I learned to work with several men around, I don’t recall any relevant prejudice. Prof. John McDermid from the University of York, my PhD supervisor, was very important to strengthen my professional confidence and plan my career.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
JSERD faces several challenges as a new journal. We mainly need to increase visibility and attract good quality paper to reach a stable flow of publication. We have already shown that papers go to a serious review process. Moreover, we need to show that JSERD can publish several categories of paper, so people need to be aware that this is really a new, serious and attractive alternative.

Dr. Amy Neustein, Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Speech Technology 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was drawn to speech technology since the early 1980s when this field was arguably still in its infancy. At that time, I was able to project decades down the road how the lives of everyday users and professionals, as well as the lives of the elderly, disabled and the visually impaired, would be forever changed once such technologies would be woven into our society and culture, showing up in different areas such as commerce, healthcare, homeland security, just to name a few. What appealed to me most was that speech technology inhered an amazing potential to significantly improve so many diverse facets of our lives. For example, the everyday use of basic speech recognition and text-to-speech in the customer contact centers to field a large number of customer queries and complaints. Or on a much deeper level, the use of speech technology in treating those suffering from clinical depression, autism spectrum disorders and terminal illness, or in treating those whose natural voices, having been lost to a major stroke or laryngectomy, require voice reconstruction.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I am very much inspired by a number of speech scientists such as Dr. Debbie Dahl, formerly of Unisys and currently head of Conversational Technologies, whose leading edge work in integrating natural language understanding with speech recognition has set a new standard for spoken dialog systems. By boosting the speech system’s ability to understand unconstrained natural language input, basically letting the user say in their own words what the problem is as opposed to asking the user to choose a canned response from a prearranged list of menu items, Dr. Dahl’s stellar research has enabled dialog systems to skillfully adjust to the user’s own pattern of speaking rather than ask the user to adjust to the speech system instead. This is indeed an amazing accomplishment that has won Dr. Dahl recognition as the Chair of the World Wide Web Consortium Multimodal Interaction Working Group, and as Co-Chair of the “Workshop on W3C's Multimodal Architecture and Interfaces”. I am equally inspired by Dr. Judith Markowitz, president of J. Markowitz Consultants, who has been a well-recognized pioneer in the speech technology industry for over 25 years. In addition to being the author of books, newsletters, reports and numerous articles, Dr. Markowitz has served with distinction on two American National Standards Institute (ANSI) committees where she was lead editor of a prestigious report on voice biometrics. I am additionally inspired by Dr. Markowitz who has brought an in depth understanding of speech enabled robotics to real-life settings, such as handling challenging factory and warehouse tasks. As a visionary, however, Dr. Markowitz has seen the role of speech and automata realized well beyond its initial warehouse setting, to include the use of robots in many different sectors of healthcare and eldercare thereby revolutionizing the way pediatric and adult care is handled across the globe. I have had the privilege of working with both Drs. Dahl and Markowitz on the publication of their research in journals and books and look forward to continuing my working relationship with such admirable women.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
It is my goal to put together a special issue this year showing how the confluence of different academic fields, from computational linguistics and discourse analysis to speech act theory and conversation analysis, have played a significant role in the design of speech technology methods, tools and applications. The role they play is to catalyze speech technologies so that such technologies can better serve the needs of government and healthcare. It is my goal not to keep this special issue on the shelf, but to bring it to the attention of government agencies and healthcare institutions from around the world. In this way, they can use this compendious edition to guide and direct their projects and activities that sorely need a fresh, new interdisciplinary approach to speech recognition, speaker verification and identification, digitized speech, text-to-speech systems, and the other related facets of speech technologies.

EDUCATION and LANGUAGE

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Karen Edge, Dr. Annette Wannamaker, Dr. Kendall A. King, Dr. Merrilyn Goos, Dr. Karen C. Cohen, Dr. Catherine Milne, and Dr. Christina Siry for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

EDUCATION & LANGUAGE: Dr. Karen Edge, Editor-in-Chief, Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountabilty 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Throughout graduate school at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education/University of Toronto (OISE/UT), I was deeply interested in the influence of research evidence on policy and practice and the iterative process of knowledge generation in organisations. However, I was not intending to pursue an academic career path. After having studied the biological sciences as an undergraduate, with few woman professors in sight, perhaps it was that it never occurred to me that an scholarly career was a possibility. During my time at OISE/UT, I worked with tremendously able and committed scholars who were actively engaging in rigourous research and challenging the norms of how researchers and professionals collaborated and used evidence to inform practice. This was probably the turning point for me. Seeing research in action and understanding that a life in academe could be truly innovative and publicly engaged. It was during my PhD that I became more determined to carve out an academic life in this vein.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw Inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Throughout my graduate studies, there were incredibly inspirational and the professors who allowed me to work alongside them on both local and international research projects. Their support and encouragement truly catalysed my belief in myself and in the importance of research in the greater spheres of policy and practice. Fortunately for me, while these academics were engaged in shaping their respective academic fields, they were also actively nurturing the next generation of women scholars. I owe a great deal of thanks to the following Professors who supported my scholarly development and motivated me to pursue my academic career including: Janet Chrispeels; Alison Griffith; Cecelia Reynolds; and Carol Rolheiser.
Once I decided to pursue an academic career, I was fortunate to secure my first academic post at the Institute of Education, University of London. The Institute's global reputation for innovative and important scholarship across a wide range of subjects was an inspirational draw. Within my own field, women academics have held high expectations of my own contribution to the field including Dr Jan Robertson and Professor Alma Harris. Similarly, my current research agenda explores Generation X school leaders in London, New York City and Toronto to examine their development, experience and aspiration. I have been fortunate yet again to call on colleagues who are assisting my team in creating new strands of research and theory building via their own work and sharing their perspectives on our work including: Carol Vincent, Ann Pheonix, Heidi Mirza. I am fortunate to have worked with such a long list of inspirational and influential women academics who have nurtured others in the field with fairness, patience, integrity and encouragement. Collectively, they have paved the way for future generations of scholars within sociology, educational policy and leadership.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountabilty is entering an exciting phase of its development. Our inclusion in ISI has radically increased the volume of papers we are receiving and our Editorial Board and Review Panel will be expanding as well! We have two upcoming issues on teacher assessment and participatory evaluation in developing contexts that will make significant contributions to the international debates and discussions. We will be at AERA and CIES conferences and are happy to entertain new ideas for special issues for 2015.

EDUCATION & LANGUAGE: Dr. Annette Wannamaker, Co-Editor, Children's Literature in Education 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
What most appealed (and still appeals) to me about the study of children’s literature is its complexity. Because books and media texts for children must necessarily address a mixed audience of children and the parents, teachers, or other adults who are looking over their shoulders ready to approve or disapprove or even censor, children’s stories are never quite what they seem, and often contain multiple, often contradictory, layers of meaning. A children’s story—whether a picturebook or poem or film or novel—is never just a story, and is instead an intricate map of the complex relationships between adults and children in a given time, location and culture.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
The academic study of children’s literature has traditionally been a field dominated by women, and women have been tremendously influential in all aspects of the field, from publishing to authorship, librarianship, teaching and scholarship. It is a field where inspiring female role models abound, and where senior colleagues (both male and female) generously encourage and nurture the work being done by emerging scholars.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Children's Literature in Education is one of the oldest and most prestigious journals featuring peer-reviewed articles on literature for young readers. We strive to maintain this strong tradition and reputation, while also working to publish the most current, cutting-edge work being done by a wide range of scholars studying children’s culture, literature and media around the globe. This year, we will be awarding the first annual CLE Emerging Scholar Award to a promising scholar, and the winning essay will be published in the journal.

LINGUISTICS: Dr. Kendall A. King, Co-Editor, Language Policy 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was drawn to the field of language policy because it is the critical link that helps us understand the intersections across what people think about language, what they do with language, and what they try to do to language. My early work was Quichua (an Indigenous endangered language) of Ecuador, and I was driven to understand both _why_ Quichua had become endangered, but more importantly, what could be done to support and revitalize it.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Language policy as a field has been deeply shaped by the work of women scholars, including Teresa McCarty, Nancy Hornberger, Joan Rubin, Shirley Brice Heath, Elana Shohamy, Tove Skutnabb-Kangas and many others. I was very fortunate to have Nancy Hornberger as an advisor and mentor at the University of Pennsylvania, and I continue to be inspired by her scholarly work as well as her commitment to both research excellence and social justice.
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What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
I'm very pleased that this year the journal will publish several high-interest, cutting edge thematic issues. The first of these is thematic issue on 'Engaged Language Policy', edited by Kathryn A. Davis. Davis, in her introduction, outlines what is meant by engaged language policy as both a conceptual and dialogic approach that is grounded in critical theory and informed by political activism. Five papers, including many by leading women scholars, explore what this means in practice and research in various sites around the world: 1) Prem Phyak and Bui Thi Ngoc Thuy: Youth Engaging Language Policy: Ideologies and Transformations from Within 2) Sandra R. Schecter, Isabel García Parejo, Théophile Ambadiang, and Carl James: Schooling Transnational Speakers of the Societal Language: Language Variation Policy¬– Making in Madrid and Toronto 3) Fabio Oliveira Coelho and Rosemary Henze: English for what? Rural Nicaraguan Teachers’ Local Responses to National Educational Policy 4) Lucinda Pease-Alvarez and Alisun Thompson: Teachers Working Together to Resist and Remake Educational Policy 5) Juliet Langman: Translanguaging, Identity, and Learning: Science Teachers as English Language Planners.

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION: Dr. Merrilyn Goos, Editor-in-Chief, Educational Studies in Mathematics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was fascinated by the way in which I could see mathematics everywhere in the world around me, and puzzled as to why other children didn't seem to see the things I did or have the same "playful" relationship with mathematics. When I became a teacher of secondary school mathematics, I wondered why some students could confidently tackle unfamiliar problems, drawing on all their knowledge resources to work out and try potential solution strategies, while other students – who might be equally well resourced with mathematical knowledge – either remained "stuck" or wandered off the task with strategies that led nowhere. Mathematical thinking intrigued me, and fuelled the investigations I undertook for my Masters and doctoral theses. My interests have moved on, but the thrill of this early research has stayed with me.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
The closest mentors and colleagues who supported and inspired me as a young researcher were mainly men, and I want to give them credit for the way they developed me as a researcher. They were important influences on my career because they treated me – a postgraduate student and research assistant – as an equal, giving me opportunities to write research grants with them, shape the projects for which we were successful in receiving funding, and collaborate in publishing from these grants (usually as first author). I look back now and realise they were carefully nurturing me by placing opportunities before me and gradually increasing the level of challenge so I would continue to grow. From them I learned more than research methods and techniques for writing grant applications: I learned how to "be" an academic. There were also women mathematics education researchers outside my immediate environment who shaped my worldview in different ways. All were demanding and rigorous in their scholarly approach to research, but their fields of influence varied – from contributing new theoretical insights via highly cited publications, to holding leadership positions in national and international research organisations, to leading collaborative research and development projects that brought together university academics, school teachers, and education systems. That taught me that there is no single "template" for an academic career.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
The diversity of research in mathematics education around the world is always interesting. This year I'd like to see more articles submitted and published with authors from previously under-represented regions, such as south-east Asia and South America. There are also two special issues nearing completion: one on vocational knowledge in mathematics education and the other on statistical reasoning. Both are important areas for research that may not be well represented in mainstream mathematics education journals.

SCIENCE EDUCATION: Dr. Karen C. Cohen, Senior Edior-in-Chief, Journal of Science Education and Technology 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
My "field" evolved and continues to do so. The fact that I had so many--too many-- opportunities and requirements, along with interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training that I often had to think of and react to challenges by solving problems practically for the immediate term and ideally for the very long term--I was thinking "out of the box" before the term became popular.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
To be truthful, there were very few female role models or mentors so many years ago. I learned from my classmates, my professors, (all of whom were male), and colleagues with whom I came in touch, and my students.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Continuous Growth, Communication, Global expansion, and Advances.

SCIENCE EDUCATION: Catherine Milne and Christina Siry, Co-Editors-in-Chief, Cultural Studies of Science Education 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Catherine Milne: I have always had an interest in how we understand what it means to know in science. This is what drew me to research in the first place. As I have said before: Knowing, as a construct, encompasses elements including experiencing and understanding phenomena, explaining phenomena and communicating experiences, understanding and explanations. These elements are often treated as key elements of knowing in science education. But what is of interest to me is how cultural and historical facets, which promote the emergence of specific ideologies about science and science education (whose science), frame this knowing. Working with teachers and students in urban schools and inspired by scholars such as Kenneth Tobin, has challenged me to think more about the sociocultural components of learning and how learning is enacted as cultural production and/or cultural transformation. My exploration of the history of science reinforced for me the sociocultural situatedness of science and the implications of that for how science is represented in school science. Raising questions of whose science gets told in educational contexts. I endeavor to make a sociocultural focus a cornerstone of my practice as a scholar, which leads me to challenge myself to acknowledge the role of language and symbol systems in maintaining knowledge structures including instruments developed for research purposes. This is why I am so passionate about the journal for which Chris Siry and I are co-EIC because it is a place where these ideas have space to develop and grow.
Christina Siry: My work is in the field of elementary science education, and I conduct research into the teaching and learning of science with young children. I was drawn to research in this area as I have always been interested in the ways in which children discover, interpret, and interact with, their world. The appeal of exploring this area of research to me is that we are always learning something new – as we work together with children and with teachers, we have the possibility to find new ways to facilitate the teaching and learning of science.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Christina Siry: It might sound cliché, but I find most of my inspiration from the teachers and children that I have work with through the years.
Catherine Milne: The scholars that influenced me were Anne Fasto-Sterling, Evelyn Fox-Keller (especially her biography of Barbara McClintock), Eleanor Duckworth (The Having of Wonderful Ideas), Sue Willis (especially her chapter in the book Gender, Science and Mathematics [published by Springer] and edited by Leslie Parker, Leonie Rennie, and Barry Fraser. I continue to draw inspiration from Jane Butler Kahle.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Christina Siry and Catherine Milne: This year we have transitioned to include a new member of our group of Editors-in-Chief. Mike Mueller, from the University of Alaska Anchorage, has joined Catherine Milne and myself as a third co-editor-in-chief. He replaces the founding editor, Kenneth Tobin, who has built up our journal over the past 9 years. Our journal’s content will continue to develop through cutting-edge scholarship in the intersections of cultural studies and science education, and we look forward to building the sociocultural community in science education and the science of education through CSSE. We are working to expand our reach into science education communities in which English is not the first language through our use of Executive Summaries. We also have a number of special issues in preparation including gender and science education, rural contexts of science education, science education and special education, and informal science education.

Free and Recommended Reads  

LIFE and ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

A Thank You to Our Participating Editors 

We thank Dr. Joanna Setchell, Dr. Monica G. Turner, Dr. Gretta Pecl, Dr. Kate Lajtha, Dr. Mary Ann Curran, and Dr. Heather J. Hoag for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

ANIMAL SCIENCES : Dr. Joanna Setchell, Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Primatology 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
My dad gave me a toy monkey when I was two years old. ‘Monkey’ and I were inseparable for years, and he still sits in my living room. He is my first taxonomic mistake, as he is quite clearly a juvenile ape, not a monkey! The UK has no non-human primates, but as a child I was fascinated by the next best arboreal taxon - squirrels. I spent hours watching them, and reading encyclopaedia entries about squirrels of the world. However, it wasn’t until I spent several months in East Africa, after graduating from my first degree in Biology, that I realised that primatology existed. There, I spent hours watching baboons, and visited the chimpanzees at Mahale mountains. I talked about them incessantly, until a friend said ‘you’ve got a Biology degree - why not study them’? I did. What appeals most to me is the combination of the daily soap opera of observing social primates, in combination with the opportunity to address exciting theoretical questions. And, of course, the delight of fieldwork in very different countries, including Gabon, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of Congo and Malaysian Borneo.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Primatology has always had very strong female role models. Unlike many fields in science, we are often seen as an equal opportunity discipline, although, sadly, there is still evidence of a glass ceiling at senior levels. It’s difficult to single out individual women among the many, but fieldworkers and campaigners like Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey are highly visible to the public, while Jeanne Altmann pioneered both the importance of sampling the behaviour of all individuals equally and non-invasive studies. Closer to home, Phyllis Lee examined my PhD and mentored me subsequently, while Ann Maclarnon, Caroline Ross and Debbie Curtis all contributed to my career development. I count my colleagues among my closest friends.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We have some great Special Issues coming up. One is just about to appear, on the Genetic Basis of Primate Behaviour, guest edited by two excellent female primatologists. I received the cover proofs a few days ago and look forward to seeing it in print! Another special issue is on the costs of male success, and a third is on Primate Communities. And, of course, we have many other exciting manuscripts under review and in revision.

ECOLOGY: Dr. Monica G. Turner, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Ecosystems 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I became interested in the out-of-doors from family vacations spent camping in the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains and in several of the eastern US national parks. However, a summer spent in Yellowstone National Park as a Student Conservation Association intern at age 19 is what led me to choose ecology as my career. I worked as a Ranger-Naturalist at Old Faithful and spent three months in one of the most amazing wilderness landscapes. That experience solidified my desire to study the complexities of the world around us and to choose a path that allowed me to work outdoors, rather than in a laboratory or clinical setting. As I progressed through graduate school and my postdoctoral research, I also grew to love research.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Yes, although I had several very supportive and influential male mentors, as well. Dr. Susan P. Bratton was a US National Park Service research scientist based at the University of Georgia while I was a graduate student. Susan was a member of my PhD advisory committee, funded my doctoral research, and spent valuable time with me in the field. She was a terrific mentor. As a young scientist, I had the opportunity to hear presentations by leading female ecologists, including Dr. Margaret Davis, who served as president of the Ecological Society of America (ESA) from 1987-88 and addressed women in ecology in her presidential address; and Dr. Jane Lubchenco, who led the Sustainable Biosphere Initiative for ESA, also served as ESA president, and has held a number of high-profile leadership positions in science. These women have all sources of inspiration to me and many other young scientists. They also helped to eliminate institutional barriers and pave the way for other women in ecology.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
ECOSYSTEMS is now publishing its 17th volume and continues to thrive. We continue to seek the best of ecosystem science and to feature mini-reviews that synthesize current areas of ecosystem ecology and shape future directions of our science. ECOSYSTEMS also seeks to increase publication of interdisciplinary research that has direct bearing on ecosystem structure and function.

ECOLOGY: Dr. Gretta Pecl, Editor-in-Chief, Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Initially as a younger scientist I was very curiosity-driven and motivated to answer questions about the structure and function of marine organisms, and of broader ecosystems. It really appealed to me to have aspects of my work that combined research out in the field, long days at sea spent fishing and SCUBA diving, with detailed laboratory experiments and approaches. Now, I realize that the ocean plays an incredibly pivotal role in our global environment in terms of its contribution to climate regulation, and in the sustainability of human populations through the provision of resources, and I am much more driven to conduct applied research. A key focus at the moment, like many of my colleagues, is the significant challenge of maintaining a healthy ocean with functioning marine ecosystems as we move into the Anthropocene - with not only larger impacts on our natural systems but also larger demands as our global population grows.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Sure there are many great examples of pioneers in the field of marine science. At the risk of being highly predictable, I’d have to cite Jane Lubchenco and Sylvia Earle as the pioneers I’ve found most inspiring – particularly because both of these women were (and are still) not only at the forefront of their respective fields but they have throughout their careers also dedicated much time to science communication and engagement. The efforts of both these women have led to significant improvements in the public’s understanding of how our world works, and the important role that science plays in maintaining and improving our way of life. More directly, here in Hobart, Tasmania, we have the southern hemisphere’s largest concentration of marine scientists, and the new Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies is already making great strides even though we are only a few years old – so I don’t have to look very far to find inspiring women that are at the forefront of their fields, they are literally all around me! On a personal level, I’ve been exceptionally fortunate to have some fantastic mentors and colleagues both male and female throughout my career. I’m very grateful for their assistance, support and sage advice, particularly whilst I navigated some ‘interesting’ years of juggling maternity leaves, part-time work and short-term post-docs.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
I’ve just started this year as Editor in Chief of Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries and I’m very excited about having the opportunity to play a role in further developing such a well-respected journal. Review articles have always been necessary to provide a retrospective and critical look at how our knowledge in any particular research field may have developed with time, however, I think the role of review articles is arguably becoming more important. In addition to the sheer volume of global science outputs increasing, funding is generally increasingly limited as science budgets shrink and prioritization in the face of multiple stressors is therefore an imperative. Review papers, providing rapid and timely synthesis and evaluation of larger bodies of complex information, allow efficient identification of constructive future research avenues. Together with my editorial board I plan on commissioning a set of themed reviews that examine some the key challenges for marine systems facing us into the future. Importantly, in addition to significant challenges, there are also many exciting new frontiers in whole animal biology, fisheries and marine science more broadly. Reviews, along with quality original research articles which we also publish, will play an important role during this period of rapid development in novel technologies and new techniques. Lastly, I’ll be working with our authors to encourage them to blog about their research, or find other suitable avenues for disseminating research outcomes more widely with the public. I’m very passionate about science communication and hope to help support improved public understanding of our work, in addition to creating a comprehensive update of recent fields and developments for our specialist audience.

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY: Dr. Kate Lajtha, Editor-in-Chief, Biogeochemistry 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was always interested in science, as both of my parents were scientists. So in a way, my mother was my first inspiration, to know that it was possible to be a scientist and have a family at the same time. But my love of chemistry came from an amazing high school teacher, who showed a small Honors class in chemistry how exciting scientific enquiry can be. Many of us in that class went into chemistry, showing how important mentors can be at any stage. But I always loved being outside camping, hiking, kayaking, or swimming, and being inside a laboratory all day long didn’t really appeal to me. Thus ecosystem science and biogeochemistry seem like the perfect mix of chemistry, scientific inquiry, and being able to dig in mud and hike through old-growth forests.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
When I started in the field of biogeochemistry in graduate school, there were very few women that could act as mentors. All my professors were male. However, I had female comrades-in-arms during school, and although we were spread across the country, we were great support for each other both personally and professionally. Beth Holland, now a noted climate change scientist, and I could call each other and talk science, chemistry, soils, and life at any time. I am happy to see that my female graduate students have many more older female scientists as professors and as role models in their lives.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Biogeochemistry is doing extremely well, and our impact factor reflects that. However, we recently created two new sections to serve the needs of the scientific community and our authors. A few years ago Cory Cleveland suggested that we have a separate section called Synthesis and Emerging Ideas where authors could publish both very novel results, and also reflections and syntheses of research within the general field of biogeochemistry. More recently we started a section called Biogeochemistry Letters, edited by Matt Wallenstein, as a way to expedite publication of novel, high profile papers that need rapid turnaround and publication. As the field of biogeochemistry matures, the need for synthesis and theory development grows, and so we expect these two sections to increase in importance and impact.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: Dr. Mary Ann Curran, Editor-in-Chief, The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I am a Chemical Engineer by training and an Environmental Researcher by vocation (32 years with the US Environmental Protection Agency). I started in the field simply because that is where I could find employment in 1980. I was fortunate that one of my professors also worked for the EPA’s Office of Research and Development, and they were emphasizing minority hires at the time. I became a firm believer in the power of networking. It worked out well for me because I always desired to work in research- it appeals to my curious nature, always wanting to learn and to analyze systems.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Women in engineering in general are scarce, although that seems to be improving in recent years. Early in my career, there were no women in the research lab I could consider as mentors, and certainly none that were pioneers. I think if I had had a women mentor, it would have helped me discover how to utilize my strengths much earlier.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment continues to enjoy growth in the number of submissions it receives, as the application of LCA continues to increase. The Journal is expanding likewise, not only in the number of issues (going from 9 to 12 per year) but also in papers delving more into how the life cycle concept supports environmental sustainability which involves addressing social impacts as well as environmental impacts.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: Dr. Heather J. Hoag, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Water History 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Environmental historians are concerned with the changing relationship between human societies and the natural world. We look at the natural world as not a stage upon which history plays out, but as a key actor in the production of history. How have each shaped the other? What are the implications of this sometimes peaceful, sometimes challenging relationship? Examining these questions requires a discussion of cultural, social, economic, and political dynamics. More importantly, it necessitates an understanding of how particular places and natural forces influence human understanding, decisions, and actions. While this holistic approach initially attracted me to the field, the centrality of fieldwork and the opportunity to work interdisciplinarily with colleagues in the sciences, social sciences, and environmental planning continues to excite me. There is nothing better than a stint in the archives digging through old papers on a river delta, followed by fieldwork in that same delta with river residents, conservation biologists, and hydrologists. In addition to the more standard use of written evidence, environmental historians also get to traipse through the mud and explore the places we read about.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
My introduction to the academic fields of African environmental history and water history came in graduate school, where I was lucky to have supportive mentors. However, at the time, both fields were predominantly male. At Water History, we are working to address this imbalance and it is changing. My non-academic experiences are what most influenced my decision to pursue African and environmental history. In 1992, as a 3rd year university student, I left California to study abroad in Ghana, West Africa. Growing up in a ranching community in drought-prone California, I thought I understood water issues. However, it was not until I arrived in Ghana did I really experience firsthand the impact of water and environmental policy on individual lives. I walked fields with women who daily drew upon their deep environmental knowledge to grow subsistence crops for their family. Who, along with their girl children, were tasked with walking miles to fetch water and fuel wood for domestic use. On the university campus, the taps in our dorms often ran dry. The women on my floor, taking pity on foreign students like myself, taught me what can be done with a single bucket of water. That is true water conservation. These experiences reinforced for me the importance of incorporating people’s experiences and their perceptions into both our reconstruction of the past as well as in future policy. Such experiences, and the many that have come since, remind me of the resilience of African women and their skills as environmental managers. They reconfirm my belief that the stories we tell about the past matter. In today’s world of changing climatic patterns and growing concern over water scarcity and quality, there remains much we can learn from the past about how people have both benefitted from and adapted to their hydrological surroundings.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
This year Water History will be publishing four issues. We are pleased to include two thematic issues: “Diverting Waters: Canals through time, a technological answer to socio-environmental variability?" (guest edited by Louise Purdue and Jean-François Berger) and “Water Control in Twentieth-Century South Asia: Post-Colonial Regimes of Regulation and Response” (guest edited by Aaron Mulvany). For information on our recent issues, visit our page on SpringerLink.

BMC Plant Biology Guest Blog and a Book Recommendation 

Sheila McCormick, Section Editor for BMC Plant Biology has written a guest blog about her experience as a researcher for the BioMed Central blog: http://bit.ly/1ieYL7J
Also, please note this newly published book which summarizes women’s contributions to agriculture and food security and the obstacles to their broader participation: Gender in Agriculture

MATERIALS

A Thank You to Our Participating Editors 

We thank Dr. Margaret Stack and Dr. Suzanne Mohney for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

Dr. Margaret Stack, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Bio- and Tribo-Corrosion 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
The most inspiring thing that happened to me was attending a conference on “Erosion by Liquid and Solid Impact” run by the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England during the first year of my PhD in UMIST, Manchester. It was the combination of intellectual challenge, the academic characters and the humility and warmth of the community that appealed to me. I still remember one of the retired scientists at the time, David Tabor, standing up at the end of the conference and speaking for 10 minutes. Another academic in the conference compared erosion phenomena on the surface of materials to the outline that skiers make when descending a slope. Since I had been skiing earlier that year, I somehow connected with this and it was as if the field had become wider than I originally anticipated. After that conference, I felt that I had found my subject!
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
There were a couple of pivotal moments in my academic career and one of those was joining a female mentoring network in Manchester, run by Marion Birch (now based in Physics, University of Manchester) , as part of the UK ATHENA project, which involved networking with a group of women who had been promoted to a senior level. I was asked to be a mentor but getting involved in the network gave me much encouragement in developing a career path.
Coming from Ireland, we have had the great fortune of having had two outstanding female Presidents, Mary Robinson and Mary McAleese, both academics. They helped me realize that gender should not be a barrier to achievement at the highest level. Furthermore, Queen Elizabeth II, in the UK, as well as being such a great role model for women in public life, has done much to champion opportunities for progression of women at every level, through holding many events in Buckingham Palace highlighting the activities of women of distinction.
Rosalind Franklin’s story, and her career path probably resonates with me as it is the story of many outstanding female academics. The fact that her achievements have now been deservedly recognized should give confidence to all female scientists.
In the field of Engineering, the University of Strathclyde in Scotland was one of the first Universities in the UK to appoint women to Chair positions in the Engineering Faculty and this has given much confidence to younger colleagues in the University. Some of this was due to the influence of Vice Principal Susan Shaw who held the Research portfolio when I was appointed. Nationally, Ann Dowling, Cambridge and Julia King, Aston, have appointed women to senior positions in National bodies, giving a wider prominence to female engineers and scientists and raising their profiles.
On a personal level, my mother who was a Maths teacher, and who had a wide variety of outside interests, gave me a sense of the possibilities of the fun of an academic career. She was also a trail blazer, coming from a farming background, in West Limerick, Ireland and was one of the first in her family to attend University. She anticipated that I would follow a career in fashion design- engineering of course includes aspects of design and I would hope that she would have been pleased at the way my career progressed!
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Interactions of biological processes with Tribo-Corrosion not only cover the bio-interface such as dental implants and hip joints, but also the wider areas of barnacle and algae formation on tidal turbines and wave energy converters. We intend that we will cover the span between biomedical and renewable energy applications in publications next year. Special issues will include topics on Tribo-Corrosion of heart stents and in marine renewable energy devices. As Tribo-Corrosion mapping is a leading development in the field in recent years, we anticipate a special issue in this area also. We will also be publishing the Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tribo-Corrosion in Glasgow to be held in the University of Strathclyde, from April 9-11 this year.

Dr. Suzanne Mohney, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Electronic Materials 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
My interest in science began at an early age from watching live coverage of the manned Apollo missions and using my family’s telescope. Then I became curious about electronic materials in college. I wanted to know more about the way atoms arranged themselves into crystals and how a transistor worked. What attracted me most to my profession was the opportunity to continually learn about science and to be able to use that information to engineer new materials.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors, or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I encountered few women in science or engineering when I was young. The women who inspire me most are my long-time colleagues on the faculty at Penn State (Profs. Susan Trolier-McKinstry, Joan Redwing, and Theresa Mayer) as well as some of the new materials scientists we have hired in recent years (Profs. Coray Colina, Nasim Alem, and Allison Beese). They are each responsible for important new discoveries and inventions, and they are very dedicated to training the next generation of scientists and engineers, many of whom are also becoming leaders in the field.
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What can we look forward to this year in regard to your journal’s content or development?
The Journal of Electronic Materials will continue to offer coverage of all families of electronic materials (semiconductors, electroceramics, metals, and organic materials). However, this year we can expect added coverage of electronic materials as they are applied to solving our world’s energy needs (thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and fuel cells) and emerging materials such as two-dimensional and layered semiconductors.

MATHEMATICS

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Claudia Sagastizabal and Dr. Merrilyn Goos for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

Dr. Claudia Sagastizabal, Editor-in-Chief, Set-Valued and Variational Analysis 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I am an applied mathematician, specialising in optimization. I believe an early interest in languages is what drove me to study the mathematical sciences. I am aware that this may sound surprising, but the truth is that mathematics is a formidable communication tool.
Like a language, different mathematicians speak with different accents, nevertheless, the mathematical language is universal - once you've learnt enough of its rules, you can go around the globe and "talk" mathematics everywhere. My field of expertise has an additional bonus in this sense, since optimization pervades many real-life applications. The multidisciplinary nature of applications allows me to talk mathematics to an even broader audience.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I completed my undergraduate studies in Argentina, where I was born. Maybe because mathematics wasn’t a well-paid profession in my country, the proportion of female researchers was rather high (men migrated to more rentable careers, like engineering). I had plenty of women professors, a couple of them truly inspiring. Not necessarily by their specific teaching or research, but rather by their example, showing how to successfully balance personal and professional lives. Twenty five years have passed and I can say that being a woman in mathematics is not always a piece of cake. There has been, however, tremendous progress in recent years. Right now, the two most important professional societies in the area, the International Mathematical Union (IMU) and the International Council of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM), have female presidents, Ingrid Daubechies and Barbara Keyfitz. They both actively promote the discussion of policies and practices needed to eliminate obstacles for the professional development, career growth and job satisfaction of women in mathematical sciences. A very instructive text, triggering reflection in these issues, is the report of the 2006 BIRS workshop on Women in Mathematics.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
I will become Editor-in-Chief of the journal Set-Valued and Variational Analysis this year. For the years to come I shall strive to give the journal some numerical flavour, always maintaining the highest quality standards.
It is my belief that broadening the scope of the journal to include applications will be enriching and most beneficial. To help achieve this goal, I envision having special thematic issues, possibly related to some scientific meeting. Proposals on topics of interest for the journal are most welcome.

Dr. Merrilyn Goos, Editor-in-Chief, Educational Studies in Mathematics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was fascinated by the way in which I could see mathematics everywhere in the world around me, and puzzled as to why other children didn't seem to see the things I did or have the same "playful" relationship with mathematics. When I became a teacher of secondary school mathematics, I wondered why some students could confidently tackle unfamiliar problems, drawing on all their knowledge resources to work out and try potential solution strategies, while other students – who might be equally well resourced with mathematical knowledge – either remained "stuck" or wandered off the task with strategies that led nowhere. Mathematical thinking intrigued me, and fuelled the investigations I undertook for my Masters and doctoral theses. My interests have moved on, but the thrill of this early research has stayed with me.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
The closest mentors and colleagues who supported and inspired me as a young researcher were mainly men, and I want to give them credit for the way they developed me as a researcher. They were important influences on my career because they treated me – a postgraduate student and research assistant – as an equal, giving me opportunities to write research grants with them, shape the projects for which we were successful in receiving funding, and collaborate in publishing from these grants (usually as first author). I look back now and realise they were carefully nurturing me by placing opportunities before me and gradually increasing the level of challenge so I would continue to grow. From them I learned more than research methods and techniques for writing grant applications: I learned how to "be" an academic. There were also women mathematics education researchers outside my immediate environment who shaped my worldview in different ways. All were demanding and rigorous in their scholarly approach to research, but their fields of influence varied – from contributing new theoretical insights via highly cited publications, to holding leadership positions in national and international research organisations, to leading collaborative research and development projects that brought together university academics, school teachers, and education systems. That taught me that there is no single "template" for an academic career.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
The diversity of research in mathematics education around the world is always interesting. This year I'd like to see more articles submitted and published with authors from previously under-represented regions, such as south-east Asia and South America. There are also two special issues nearing completion: one on vocational knowledge in mathematics education and the other on statistical reasoning. Both are important areas for research that may not be well represented in mainstream mathematics education journals.

MEDICINE and PUBLIC HEALTH

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Latha Stead, Dr. Juleen Zierath, Dr. Angelika Bischof-Delaloye, Dr. Ana Navas-Acien, Dr. Siobán D. Harlow, Dr. Loreto Carmona, Dr. Laura Roberts, Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, Dr. Elizabeth Sarah Ginsburg, and Dr. Lisa Amir for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE: Dr. Latha Stead, Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Emergency Medicine (A SpringerOpen Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I have wanted to be a physician since I was 4 years old, when I got my first doctor’s set for Christmas. Helping people has always been something that has been near and dear to my heart, and likely has to do with my parents' work at the United Nations, where they led numerous humanitarian projects, mostly in East Africa.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
There are two women who were a huge inspiration to me: my mother and my 9th grade English teacher.
My mother has always taught me to be independent, and stand up for what I believe in, even when it may be the tougher or less popular choice. Thanks to my parents, I have enjoyed a rich, and rewarding career in academic medicine. My 9th grade English teacher very early on recognized that I would be a writer if only the skills were nurtured. She feared that my determination to go into medicine would naturally squash any diligence towards learning a non-science subject, so she purposely gave me low grades in English so I would work harder. Her strategy, in which my dad was a co-conspirator - of targeting my grade, worked- as it got my attention. Even though I have lost touch with her after school, I think of her often, and wish she could see me now, an author of 22 books and a journal editor! Wherever you are Ms. Irvine, thank you SO much!
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
IJEM has added several new article types including educational advances, notes from the field, and practice innovations. As the filed of international emergency medicine continues to expand, readers can look forward to many more articles from around the world showcasing the development and expansion of the specialty.

INTERNAL MEDICINE: Dr. Juleen Zierath, Editor-in-Chief, Diabetologia 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
My interest in human exercise physiology was based on my own interest in athletics. In college, I was a physical education major and also an athlete competing in college in Field Hockey, Swimming and Track & Field. During studies, I took a course in exercise physiology and became fascinated in learning how the body responds to exercise training- I wanted to learn more- and searched for a Master Program that emphasized exercise physiology, where I learned more from first hand research about how the body adapts to exercise training.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
During my undergraduate education at the University of Wisconsin- River Falls, USA, I had two remarkable woman Professors who fostered my interest in exercise physiology and nutrition. They clearly were role models for me and they have continued to inspire me throughout my career. They inspired me because they had careers, not just jobs- They were committed to research and education as a career and not a 9 to 5 occupation. They helped me to see that I could take my own career seriously. They inspired me to pursue a PhD and enter into a career in research.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We will continue to focus our efforts on attracting original articles and comprehensive reviews of high scientific quality, novelty, relevance and interest to clinical and experimental research within the field of diabetes. In addition, we are working to enhance our website so that we can bring the journal content into a more “user friendly” format.

NUCLEAR MEDICINE: Dr. Angelika Bischof-Delaloye, Editor-in-Chief, EJNMMI Research (A SpringerOpen Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
The relationship between highly innovative basic research with radioactive tracers in numerous fields of biology and medicine and in clinical decision making as well.
The multidsciplinarity of nuclear medicine with the strong relationship between medicine and medical physics, engineering, radiochemistry, radiopharmacy, computer sciences and information technology.
The relationship of nuclear medicine with all clinical specialties
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Thérèse Planiol, the first woman in France having an academic position in medical physics and subsequently becoming a leading researcher in medicine and biology with a focus on diagnostic imaging (nuclear medicine, ultrasound). Being an abandoned child, raised by a foster family, she occupied influential positions in the University of Tours and acceeded to the highest honours in France. She has early realised the importance of functional imaging and has greatly shaped the place and influence of non invasive studies of organ functions, in particular of the brain and heart. She died last month at age 99.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We will try increasing the number of high quality studies published (and cited!) that will allow us applying for evaluation by ISI in view of obtaining an impact factor.

PUBLIC HEALTH: Dr. Ana Navas-Acien, Editor-in-Chief, Current Environmental Health Reports 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
A passion for science and the possibility of improving people's health by improving the environment
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Ellen Silbergeld, professor in Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is a public health champion, conducting influential research on the neurotoxic and cardiovascular effects of lead and the immune effects of mercury. Her metal research was recognized with a lifetime achievement award by the Metal Section of the Society of Toxicology. Beyond metals, she studies the impact of industrial food animal production and the movement of pathogens in the environment. Her bridging of science and public policy is a source of inspiration for public health scientists interested in environmental health.
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What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
This will be a very exciting year for Current Environmental Health Reports. The first issue of the journal is coming in March, with a focus on environmental epigenetics and early life environmental health. We will follow with issues on metals and synthetic chemicals, air pollution and global environmental health, and mechanisms of toxicity and susceptibility factors. For next year we are also planning 2 new sections, one on water and health and the other on food, health and the environment.

PSYCHIATRY: Dr. Laura Roberts, Editor-in-Chief, Academic Psychiatry 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
When I was in 8th grade, I started a school newspaper, and since then (roughly 40 years) I have worked with language as an author and editor. I find great joy in this work. My career as an editor in medicine began when I was an intern and developed, with Steven Miles, a special issue on ethics teaching in medicine for the journal Academic Medicine. It was an extraordinary experience. I view editing as a way of helping others to advance their work - it is service to others, and it is an exceptional privilege.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from?
My mentors and my inspiration come from throughout the field of medicine.
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What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
In terms of the coming year, I am thrilled to work with Springer Publishing in fostering the advancement of the journal Academic Psychiatry, the international journal of the American Association of Chairs of Departments of Psychiatry, American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training, Association for Academic Psychiatry, and the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry, features original, scholarly work focused on academic leadership and innovative education in psychiatry, behavioral sciences, and the health professions at large.
The journal began its 2014 volume year with a group of papers discussing the implications of the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which the American Psychiatric Association released mid 2013 and has far-ranging implications in psychiatric education - for trainees and for practitioners.
The journal addresses the challenges of incorporating neuroscience education into psychiatry training through a suite of articles in the March-April issue.
The May-June issue highlights various topics across the field of medical education, including in psychiatry, and features articles on the Psychiatry Milestone Project, a joint initiative of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.
Other articles planned for the year support work that furthers knowledge and stimulates evidence-based advances in academic medicine in the education, leadership, finance and administration, career and professional development, ethics and professionalism, and health and well-being.
Themes in development for the journal include training in addictions treatment and military psychiatry, developing educational programs for college mental health settings, and teaching social and behavioral medicine across the continuum of medical education.
The journal is also working with the Kubly Foundation to publish papers on suicide prevention, evaluation, and intervention in medical education.
Ongoing submissions are encouraged for the media, down-to-earth academic skills, literary resources, and educational resources columns, as well as educational case reports and letters to the editor, among other manuscript submission types.

RHEUMATOLOGY: Dr. Loreto Carmona, Editor-in-Chief, Rheumatology International 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Rheumatology is an specialty very close to the patient, and yet with a lot of very high level research. It was a good place to take out of me all the visions I had of health, the bio-psycho-social perspective. I chose it even though it was not a popular one when I finished medical school. Then, as time went by, I moved towards epidemiology within rheumatology; again, not a popular option, but I had realised, doing research in the field, that my mind was especially structured to look at problems from above, and that’s what epidemiology does.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
In rheumatology, some of my teachers were young women, full of enthusiasm, but the exposure to rheumatology in general during Medical school was extremely short, so I cannot say they were mentors. In rheuma-epidemiology I cannot recall of women at the beginning, when I started. It was all men, very inspiring though. Later on, I made good bonds to other women in rheuma-epidemiology, and it was reassuring to confirm that they all had a cohort of enthusiastic youngsters following them.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Our main goal right now is to stabilise the contents and to improve the reviewing process. We want to attract research from countries were good research is possible but yet they may have some obstacles to publication. How to do this? First, doing outreach at congresses, then doing as much education as possible on the submissions. Good ideas need also to be well reported.

TROPICAL MEDICINE: Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, Editor-in-Chief, Current Tropical Medicine Reports 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I am originally from Italy but my family moved to Honduras when I was 9 years old. I was raised in a country that continues to struggle with poverty, conflict and poor health and education outcomes. While growing up I was always very sensitive to my environment. Observing these different struggles led me to pursue an education and eventual career in biomedical science and research. I was very lucky that the influence of my family, which is made up of business entrepreneurs, allowed me to initiate a path into academic science while retaining a business of science curiosity to try to address and hopefully understand better the diseases that afflict the populations in countries such as Honduras. My background and experiences in Honduras led me to earn a degree in microbiology and clinical chemistry in 1989 with a strong emphasis in diseases of the poor or the so called ‘neglected tropical diseases”.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from?
I was very fortunate that throughout my upbringing and later during my graduate training I had strong women where I drew my inspiration, resilience and will power. Strong women in my family especially my paternal grandmother showed me how to be resilient and never get discouraged by apparent failures or difficult times. When after my undergraduate degree in Honduras I moved to the United states and pursue my graduate training I had two key women mentors, Drs. Maureen Goodenow and Giovannella Moscovici that to date continue to prepare me and coach me throughout my professional development, my career and provide inspiration. They not only have guided me professionally and personally but prepared me to become the strong mentor and leader.
How might they have inspired change in your field?
These strong women have allowed me to design a personal philosophy and a definition of leadership – “to be able to motivate and empower other women and build strong inter- and intra-relationships and positively contribute the global health problems facing the world’s poorest populations”. Working in the academic and biotechnology tropical medicine environment I continue to focus on novel strategies for team leadership, group effectiveness and cohesion. I am a firm believer that to be an effective woman leader it is essential to learn how to master a set of core of capabilities which includes transparency, ability to empower, accountability and innovation.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
This is an exciting year! We just launched the first edition of “Current Reports in Tropical Medicine”. As we describe in our inaugural editorial, the tropical medicine field is back in fashion. The World Health Organization recognizes at least 17 tropical infec¬tions that are highly prevalent among the poor living in low- and middle-income countries and in the poorest population pockets in the G-20 countries. Therefore, our journal will highlight the latest advances and knowledge of a wide array of tropical infections and create a forum where scientists can delve into the world of biosciences accelerating the transition of discoveries from the basic sciences into translational research. The ultimate goal is to create new and better tools for the effective management, prevention, identification and cure of these diseases amongst the afflicted poor populations.

WOMEN'S HEALTH: Dr. Elizabeth Sarah Ginsburg, Editor-in-Chief, Fertility Research and Practice (A BMC Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
First, I was excited to work with women, and chose Ob/Gyn due to that and my interest in both medicine and surgery. During residency, Reproductive endocrinology appealed to me because at that time, in the late ’80,s IVF was changing and improving rapidly. It was clearly a dynamic area with a great amount of room for invention and exploration. The opportunity to assist people to have the families they so desired inspired me to work hard clinically, and to pursue an academic career which in which I could help move the field forward through research.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Unfortunately at the time I trained there were few female role models. As a resident I briefly interacted with a female attending in REI who loved IVF and caring for women, and reaffirmed my belief that it was a field that would suit me well, and vice versa. I had an excellent male mentors, however (Robert Barbieri MD, now chair of Ob/Gyn at Harvard Medical School and my department chair) who helped me develop my research and clinical career. Later in my career when I was on faculty at BWH I was fortunate that our division hired a senior female PhD embryology lab director, Catherine Racowsky PhD who was both my collaborator and mentor on many IVF research projects, as well as our recently published IVF textbook. Our collaboration has taught me how important it is to have colleagues who work with you, challenge you and thereby inspire you to work hard in the present and always plan for what you can accomplish in the future.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
I have a great deal of experience with clinical research, and am fortunate to have excellent collaborators and colleagues at Harvard and elsewhere who have great depth of experience in areas focusing on all areas of reproduction, from epidemiologic to surgical research. I am excited to have Danny Schust, a reproductive immunologist and basic scientist, as my co-editor. Between us, we plan our journal to encompass all aspects of fertility and reproduction, from male and female infertility and their evaluation and treatments, including laboratory aspects of IVF, to reproductive failure (ie pregnancy loss), to epidemiologic studies of fertility as well as environmental factors affecting pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes. We also hope to encompass reproductive surgery which, like IVF, has continued to improve rapidly. We hope to include videos as well as written reports. The journal will include case reports and case series, because in many cases a theme in medical outcomes is not discovered until initial reports begin to emerge. The online journal format will be highly effective in disseminating articles promptly.

WOMEN'S HEALTH: Dr. Lisa Amir, Editor-in-Chief, International Breastfeeding Journal (A BMC Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
As a medical student, I developed in interest in women’s and children’s health, and I particularly enjoyed educating women about the reproductive functions of their bodies. As a new mother in the 1980s, I realised how little I knew about lactation and breastfeeding, and started educating myself – and haven’t stopped! It is a fascinating field because it involves anatomy, physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, psychology, sociology, all the way to epidemiology and public health. My research has stretched across many of these areas, so I have a wide range of collaborators and colleagues around the world.

WOMEN'S HEALTH: Dr. Siobán D. Harlow, Editor-in-Chief, Women's Midlife Health (A BMC Journal) 

What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
In college, I worked with the Coalition for the Medical Rights of Women in San Francisco, an organization that pushed for greater scientific and regulatory attention to critical issues in women's health. I quickly recognized how often we had to argue scientific points with very limited data. I decided it was important to obtain the education and training needed to begin generating the missing data and ensure that women's health needs were more comprehensively addressed by scientific investigators.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
Dr. Anna Baetjer, a pioneer in the fields of industrial hygiene and occupational health, who argued in the 1940's that menstrual problems women's experienced in industry were more likely related to chemical exposures than to malingering, the prevailing perception at the time.
Alice Wolfson, who in the 1960s had the courage to stand up in congress and insist that the strokes in women using birth control pills needed to be investigated.
Dr. Michele Warren who early on asked critical questions about the role of exercise in menstrual dysfunction and who continues to pursue an integrated understanding of women's mental, physical and reproductive health.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Women's Midlife Health will be launched this summer to provide a forum for research that provides new insights into the health transitions that occur during midlife, welcoming research that examines the vulnerabilities and opportunities during this life stage and their consequences for healthy aging.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I was intrigued by the pioneering studies conducted in the 1950s and 60s by Niles Newton, a psychologist in the USA. Some of these were experiments on the effects of stress on the let-down reflex – she and her obstetrician husband investigated the effects on Niles herself! I was privileged to meet her at the first international conference I attended in 1991, and have admired the way she set out to study human lactation using a range of different methods. Her writings on the physiology and psychology of breastfeeding moved the field ahead and are still influential today. Furthermore, I learnt the importance of attending conferences and connecting with other researchers in the field.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
This year we are excited by a new thematic series on the economic aspects of breastfeeding. Guest-edited by Dr Julie Smith, Australian National University, the thematic series will be published in September 2014 and invites original research, reviews, commentaries, clinical perspectives, and practice insights around this topic. We have a number of Article Processing Charge waivers and an award for the best article. Please see the journal website for more information.

BMC Guest Blogs 

Please note the following two guest blogs:
Philippa Hay, Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Eating Disorders, has written a guest blog about what has driven her in her career, which you can read here: http://bit.ly/1fMHf7s
Rosemary Tannock, Editor-in-Chief of Behavioral and Brain Functions, has also written a guest blog, which can be read here: http://bit.ly/1lDg47c

Free Access Journal Articles 

Read and download articles from and about women Nobel Prize winners in Physiology and Medicine. Free access expires April 8, 2014.

Free Download Book Chapters 

PHYSICS and ASTRONOMY

A Thank you to our participating editors 

We thank Dr. Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, Dr. Sonya Bahar, and Dr. Luisa Cifarelli for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

Dr. Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, Main Editor, Solar Physics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
As far as I can remember, I have never wanted to be anything else but an astronomer. My main inspirations were my mother's fascination with mathematics and interest in natural sciences (she was a chemist) and an outstanding Hungarian children's book about Archimedes.
In communist Hungary, where I grew up, there was an emphasis of making no difference between men and women in professional life. Of course, this did not perfectly work in practice, but it still had an influence on career choices of girls, and it certainly facilitated my path towards astronomy. My astronomy class at Eötvös University in Budapest had a majority of female students.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
My first and most important mentor was my chemist mother. At university, I learned algebra from Professor Vera T. Sós, whose brilliance in science, elegance, and refinement had a long-lasting influence, as she became a role model for many students. She taught us that a woman does not have to become a man in a profession traditionally pursued by men.
In astronomy, I met many helpful female colleagues from Western Europe and the US when I married a Dutch astronomer and moved to The Netherlands, Japan, and later to France. Two-three decades ago women were in small minority in astronomy, and showed great solidarity with each other. In the UK at the University College London I work in a group, where the academic staff has a majority of women (4/5). We are widely known for attracting and mentoring female PhD students, so the trend continues. I have to say, however, that also I had great teachers and mentors who were men! 
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal's content or development?
When I became Editor in Chief of Solar Physics in 2005 (the first female EiC of the Journal), we were mainly publishing articles about the physics of the Sun. Since then we have extended the scope of the Journal to include articles about solar influence on the Heliosphere and the Earth, the so-called space weather. This may have played part in the steady increase of articles submitted to Solar Physics. In order to avoid long waiting times for articles on the "Online First" list to be included in an issue, we have made very thick issues and also published ahead, i.e. the June issue in February 2014. In this year we will change for continuous publishing of articles, which will be very welcome, as it will remove waiting times.

Dr. Sonya Bahar, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Biological Physics 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I wanted to understand the universe, plain and simple. I was driven by a very “existentialist” attitude when I was a student: the world is absurd, and as a conscious being I wanted to explore it as deeply as possible while I could. Having a very materialist bent, this naturally led me to science. When trying to decide what science to go into, I was initially attracted by chemistry, and read a textbook I had borrowed from my school library (reading it by flashlight at night, feeling very “Madame Curie”). But I the part of the book I found most fascinating was the chapter about the Bohr atom, so I soon began to read about the revolution in physics in the 1920s, and fell in love with quantum mechanics. I read A. d’Abro’s The Rise of the New Physics, and the die was cast! When I started my undergraduate studies (in the Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science at Drexel University in Philadelphia), I was determined to go into theoretical particle physics (isn’t everyone?). But in my senior year (1990-1991) I began to learn about nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory. I read James Gleick’s beautiful popular science book Chaos: the Making of a New Science, and had the opportunity to do my senior thesis working with Robert Gilmore, a pioneer in chaos theory who was then exploring the internal structure of chaotic attractors. At the same time, I “re-discovered” biology, which I had basically ignored since high school. I began to think about the possibility of combining nonlinear dynamics with biology. I was moving toward the idea of complex systems (and was very inspired by a talk that Stuart Kauffman gave at Drexel as a guest of our Society of Physics Students), but the link between dynamics and biology was so new at the time that I was flying blind, trying to find my way into a field that hardly existed yet. I decided to pursue graduate studies in Biophysics at the University of Rochester, and worked with Phil Knauf on anion exchange in blood cells; it was a very “wet lab biochemistry” dissertation, and while it was fascinating to learn a new field of science, I missed mathematics and physics. Gradually, during postdoctoral work, I figured out what research areas had the most exciting mixture of nonlinear dynamics and biophysics. Since 1997 I have been working on dynamics in biological systems, initially with cardiac dynamics and neural synchronization, and now with dynamics and phase transitions in evolutionary models. For me, it’s a perfect balance.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I wish I could give a clear “yes” answer to the first of these questions, but I can’t. As a child, I was inspired, as are so many young women, by the story of Madame Curie (and watched a brilliant BBC series on her life in the late 1970s). I was very inspired by a chemistry teacher, Charlotte Hameka, when I was in high school; but I was equally inspired by my physics teacher, William Sweeney, so I think it was more the personalities of these wonderful teachers rather than their genders that made them important to me. As a student, I knew very successful women researchers (Joan Centrella at Drexel and Ingrid Sarelius at Rochester). All that being said, most of the physicists I read about (and studied with) were men, and I set off in science with the expectation that I would be a scientist alongside my male colleagues, and that gender would have nothing to do with my intellectual work. My father was a professor of mechanical engineering (he really worked on classical mechanics, for the most part), and he was always very encouraging of me, and never considered the possibility that my gender would impede my career. I had several wonderful mentors as an undergraduate who were men (Bob Gilmore and Lorenzo Narducci). I became much more aware of gender issues when I was a graduate student. I saw a close friend hospitalized with anorexia and realized with horrifying clarity how societal demands can twist the mental energy of young women away from fighting to explore and improve the world, and dissipate all that energy in self-hatred. I saw how that poison had affected me as well; that enraged me and I wanted to fight against it. I also saw gender bias in a way I had not experienced as an undergraduate: one professor called me a “wench”, and another commented, after a visiting seminar speaker had given an energetic and exciting talk on her research, “She must have a lot of testosterone to be running a big lab like that.” It was experiences like that that led me to read in more depth about the women’s rights movement, and to become a feminist. I was very inspired by writers like Susan Sontag and Kate Millett. Their exploration of the creative process, in others and in themselves, was immensely liberating to me, and provided a creative freedom that I have tried to bring into my own work.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
This year, we are planning to add several new members to the JOBP board, in order to expand our expertise in systems biology, quantum/density functional calculations, and the applications of statistical mechanics in the study of molecular structure. This will help the journal continue to grow in some of the most exciting and cutting-edge areas of biological physics. We are hoping to highlight as well some advances in the biological physics of DNA translocation, and the role of biological physics in the quest for a “$1000 genome”. JOBP has a long tradition of publishing special issues on important current topics, and we hope to publish an issue on polymer translocation and sequencing in 2014, guest-edited by our Editorial Board member Tapio Ala-Nissila.

Dr. Luisa Cifarelli, Co-Editor-in-Chief, The European Physical Journal Plus 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was born as a twin sister of a twin brother and in my family equal opportunities in education, in particular in scientific education, were established since the very beginning! I was therefore encouraged to follow my scientific penchant and choose a scientific curriculum as a high school student. Then, first at the University of Rome as an engineering student, then at the University of Bologna as a physics student, I developed my passion for physics.
I had the chance to be immediately "captured" for my thesis by Professor Antonino Zichichi, a renowned and outstanding experimental physicist who sent me (aged 21) to CERN, in Geneva, one of the world's top laboratories for research in high energy particle physics. I joined his group and had - since then - the fantastic opportunity to participate in forefront experiments at the utmost accelerators and colliders such as ISR, HERA, LEP, and now LHC. This is how I was launched in the fascinating field of subnuclear physics.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
My career as a young researcher, then a young professor, one of the youngest female professors in Italy at the end of last century, was certainly favoured by the special environment of my research group at CERN, led by Nino Zichichi, from whom I drew and still draw scientific inspiration. In his group I was involved in the search for free quarks and for new heavy-flavoured states, in the study of multihadron physics, in the search for supersymmetric particles, etc. at the highest energies ever achieved. In his group I learnt and experienced how fair, respectful and trustful relations between colleagues could be, no matter their gender. I could even profit, when my daughter was born in the early eighties, of "privileges" such as the choice of the best day shifts (instead of the normally unavoidable night ones) for data taking and, moreover, such as the pioneering installation of a modem-connected computer terminal in my apartment in Geneva in order to easily work at home when my baby was sleeping nearby. Nino Zichichi was strongly supporting women physicists in particle physics research and in the world of academia, especially in Italy. The decisive steps of my career were also due to a lady professor, Ida (Ducci) Ortalli, whose energy, tenacity and enthusiasm have been and still are a model for me.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
EPJ Plus is a newly born journal of the EPJ series, a continuation of Il Nuovo Cimento B formely published by the Italian Physical Society. It has been launched in 2011 as an electronic-only journal, with a new interdisciplinary approach in terms of topics and a wider portfolio of possible article formats. EPJ Plus is also meant as a "cascade" journal for the other EPJs. In the last two years, the number of articles published in EPJ Plus has significantly grown and its impact factor expectations are definitely promising. According to the recent editorial policy of the journal, invited contents, grouped in topical "Focus Points", will be boosted and contributions from new fields, such as accelerator physics or physics applied to cultural heritage or to energy, will be strongly encouraged. Being a journal inspired by learned societies, EPJ Plus is also interested in the publication of original articles derived from the best, rewarded PhD theses. After three years of adjustment, 2014 will be crucial for the future development of EPJ Plus. A timely Focus Point dedicated to today's research on crystallography with European synchrotrons is on the go, nicely dedicated to the International Year of Crystallography (IYCr2014). Stay tuned.

Free and Recommended Reads 

SOCIAL SCIENCES

A Thank You to Our Participating Editors 

We thank Dr. Winnie Lem, Dr. Faye S. Taxman, and Dr. Lorraine Mazerolle for their generous participation in this campaign, as well as their dedication to their journals.

Dr. Winnie Lem, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Dialectical Anthropology 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was drawn to anthropology as an undergraduate as it was a field of study that had the potential of making a contribution to radically transforming the world in which we live, particularly of offering critiques of forms of domination and exploitation of women and men in many different contemporary and historical contexts. At the time much anthropology and many anthropologists were engaged in research devoted to identifying and understanding the mechanisms that existed in different societies that led to social inequality and social systems premised upon power hierarchies. Such research also asked questions about how alternative social and economic systems to capitalism were made possible through the political actions of women and men. As a good many scholars in the discipline devoted their work to thinking through the political possibilities of social and economic change, it gave me a tremendous sense of optimism and hope that our imperfect world might be changed for the better.
Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
I draw on the work of any women anthropologists in my field who are mentors, sisters, comrades and colleagues. They include but are no limited to Eleanor Leacock, June Nash, Kate Young, Rayna Rapp, Jane Collins, Belinda Leach, Pauline Gardner Barber, Jane Schneider, Sydel Silverman, Nina Glick Schiller, Ayse Caglar, Ida Susser, Joan Sangster, Linda Green, Elizabeth Fittting. These women are from different generations and have made and to continue to make an impact on charting a course for anthropology and other disciplines that sustains a critical edge.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
Dialectical Anthropology will be looking forward to getting submissions from scholars in both the social sciences and humanities that carries out the journal mandate to produce work that engages with left scholarship and paradigms that critique orthodoxies. We are currently looking forward to the publishing the submissions on the political economy of international migration and another that takes on evolutionary psychology.

Dr. Faye S. Taxman, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Health and Justice (A SpringerOpen Journal) 

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What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
I was interested in issues regarding social justice. Like many, I have a family member that had a substance use disorder and thought there was more that could be done to address this behavioral health issue. I became interested in treatment programs, and then how society dealt with substance abuse. The "war on drugs" which resulted in disparity in how different individuals were handled, and how drug abusers and addicts were handled, resulted in me pursuing a research agenda on improving access to quality treatment and care. I am now devoted to improving quality of programming, and uptake of evidence based practices, in this new era of how we address behavioral health issues in our society.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
My inspiration came from a number of very influential scholars including Freda Adler, who crafted a focus on how women are treated in the justice system and Sally Hillsman who focused on novel and innovative process improvements. I was inspired that one could be a researcher and also commit to social justice issues—being a researcher means that one can be creative and explore new ideas, and one can also contribute to building knowledge.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
We will have a special edition on women offenders and access to quality care. And we will focus on a series of studies on how improving quality of care improves justice and health outcomes. Health & Justice will be devoted to improving our knowledge in ways that action can occur.

Dr. Lorraine Mazerolle, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Experimental Criminology 

TXi_LorraineMazerolle
What appealed to you in starting out in your field?
Since my early teens I have been always very curious about crime and criminals. I worried about why people committed crimes and I wanted to do something constructive about reducing crime. I started out my career as a researcher in criminology, working with the civil service on a variety of different projects. I decided to further my research skills so I started my PhD in criminology in the US (at Rutgers) in 1990. David Weisburd was, at the time, an early career professor at Rutgers and had just secured a major National Institute of Justice grant as part of the drug market analysis program. He offered me the opportunity to work with him on what became the Jersey City Drug Markets Experiment and I have been working in the field of Policing and crime prevention ever since.
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Can you recall any women colleagues, mentors or pioneers of your field you drew or continue to draw inspiration from? How might they have inspired change in your field?
At the time I was doing my PhD at Rutgers, there were a number of outstanding, intelligent women in the program. My fellow graduate school colleagues were inspirational – we all worked ridiculously long hours, always striving to better understand the dynamics of crime problems, always using the best scientific methods available. Fast forward 20 years…I am still in touch with many of these women and they are consistently pushing the frontiers of our discipline. Their dedication and passion for using their criminology research training to help save lives continues to inspire me.
What can we look forward to this year in regards to your journal’s content or development?
As the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, my editorial team and I are looking to expand the types of manuscript submissions to encourage scholars to submit papers that range in length from short, 2000 word papers to the longer, more traditional style of criminology manuscripts of 8000 words. By actively working to get these shorter submissions, we hope to attract manuscripts to the journal from a wide range of disciplines and a wide network of scholars looking to publish their experimental findings.

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