Happy 20th Birthday, JSD!

  • Browse most read and highly cited articles
  • Enjoy free trial access to the journal articles until December 31st
  • Read the interviews with former JSD Editors
  • Have a look at Guest Editorials publishing throughout 2017
  • Interested in publishing in JSD?  Find out more

A Message from Editor-in-Chief, George A. Smith

georgesmithonjsdturning20 © SpringerIt’s hard to believe that the Journal of Surfactants and Detergents has turned 20 years old. Twenty years ago, Bill Clinton was still in the White House and the European Union first adopted the Euro as a common currency.  It was also the start of a great legacy of a journal devoted exclusively to surfactants science and the use of surfactants and ingredients used in detergents and cleaning products.

           JSD was the brainchild of Michael Cox with help from Mark Nace, Lisa Quencer, and Arno Cahn.   At the time there was no journal where industrial researchers in the area of surfactants could publish their work.  Working with AOCS, JSD was established as a forum for the publication of peer- reviewed articles on the science and application of surfactants and detergents.  JSD also published review articles to give readers the opportunity to increase their knowledge of surfactant science and the industry.  Lastly, JSD provided a summary of pertinent news affecting the surfactants industry and a calendar of related events and meetings.  Read more...

Five selected articles in celebration of the 20th anniversary:

This collection of Journal of Surfactants and Detergents seminal articles, chosen because they are either highly-cited, downloaded, or of general significance, covers several investigations that are important for surfactants and detergents researchers. These topics include microemulsions, critical micelle concentrations of nonionic surfactants, and more. Read, share, and discuss these articles, featured during JSD’s 20th anniversary year celebration.

JSD at 20: Reflections on the journal from editors past and present

Journal of Surfactants and Detergents would not be what it is today without the commitment, insights, and dedication of the following individuals.

Lisa Quencer, News Editor, 1998 - 2003

© SpringerHow and why did you get involved with JSD?
I was a member of the inaugural JSD editorial team as the JSD News Editor. My involvement with JSD enabled me to work closely and directly with experts in the field of surfactants and detergents such as Milton Rosen, Arno Cahn, etc. Arno Cahn, was especially influential, not only an industry expert, but also a mentor to many in the surfactants and detergents industry. I count myself fortunate to have known Arno both as a mentor and a friend. He encouraged my involvement from both a personal and career development perspective.

What did you like most about your role with the journal?
I found it both exciting and rewarding to work on the creation of a scientific peer- reviewed journal. As a new researcher early in my career, my involvement was an excellent learning experience and an excellent way to network within the surfactants and detergents industry.
How did your involvement with JSD shape your career and/or the careers of your students?
I believe that the connections that I made through both my involvement in JSD and in the AOCS S&D Division helped to set the foundation for a successful career in the industry. I left the industry for a period to stay at home with my children and when I came back to rejoin the industry, those connections helped me to step right back in.
In what ways has JSD contributed to the science of surfactants and detergents during the past 20 years?
JSD has provided an established forum for those focused on surfactants and detergents to present their work. I feel that it has brought both focus and recognition to research in the area of surfactants and detergents.
What niche did JSD fill that other journals did not?
An established, focused area for surfactants and detergents research.

Michael F. Cox, EIC, 1998 – 2004

© SpringerHow and why did you get involved with JSD?

In the mid-nineties, a few of us AOCS and S&D Division stalwarts thought that the industry needed a journal to bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical application, and in 1998, JSD was born. I had the honor of being a founding father and its first Editor-in-Chief.

What did you like most about your role with the journal?
I enjoyed working with great people bringing the journal into reality.

How did your involvement with JSD shape your career and/or the careers of your students?
It is a highlight of my career, one which I am very proud of. I benefited from the experience in many ways. I connected with many great people--one of the key reasons belonging to AOCS is important. I also think the development and birth of the journal helped me stay connected to the science behind the management and business for surfactants and detergents.

What niche did JSD fill that other journals did not?

I think it serves as a home for papers that are between the highly theoretical and those that are highly applications-oriented.

What are the greatest challenges that surfactant and detergent scientists should address in the next 20 years, and what role can JSD play in addressing those challenges?
Twenty years is a blink of the eye, so to speak, so in general, I think we will still be working on the same issues we have now: making surfactants and detergents more efficient, reducing their impact on the environment, making them more readily available to people, and developing clever ways for them to be used with less water. The key in solving these issues is to focus on the science, and practical realities, and avoid the torrential downpours of rhetoric and ignorance that swamp the debate and advancement of science (like they do our election process).

Kirk Raney, Associate Technical Editor, 1998 - 2008

© SpringerHow and why did you get involved with JSD?

I was asked by Mike Cox to serve as Associate Technical Editor when journal was established. I served as associate editor for ten years.
What did you like most about your role with the journal?

It allowed me to follow recent technical advances in surfactants and detergents by reviewing current research papers and interacting with the authors.
How did your involvement with JSD shape your career and/or the careers of your students?

It allowed me to broaden my expertise in surfactants and detergents technologies. I had no students as I have always worked in industry.
What niche did JSD fill that other journals did not?

t is a publication of both basic and applied research in surfactants and detergents. It promoted publication by scientists from all areas of the world.
What would the field of surfactants and detergents look like today if JSD did not exist?

I feel it would be more fragmented with less collaboration among researchers.
Can you recall any published findings that changed conventional thinking or led to a paradigm shift in the field?

There have been several papers demonstrating the profound effects of rather minor structural changes in surfactant hydrophobes on physical and performance properties.
Can you think of any specific breakthroughs published in the journal that led to better or safer commercial technologies? Extended surfactants, HLD concept.
What are the greatest challenges that surfactant and detergent scientists should address in the next 20 years, and what role can JSD play in addressing those challenges?

Surfactants and detergents that are high-performing with reduced consumption of water and energy while remaining environmentally friendly.

Russ Elms, Technical Editor 2001 – 2008 

© SpringerHow and why did you get involved with JSD?

That is a great question and I don’t know if I have a good answer other than networking with other technical leaders in the industry. The journal has always provided a great forum for peer networking.

What did you like most about your role with the journal?

The caliber and diversity of the individuals working on the Journal has always been exceptional and my interactions with this group were a key reason for maintaining and expanding my roles.

How did your involvement with JSD shape your career and/or the careers of your students?

I don’t consider that JSD shaped my career. Instead it added color and dimension to my career. It has also provided me an opportunity to play it forward to other younger associates to help them brighten their careers.

In what ways has JSD contributed to the science of surfactants and detergents during the past 20 years?

The contribution has been primarily in the networks it enhances. The technical content of the journal is strong, yet is merely a starting point for meaningful technical dialog and enhancement.

What niche did JSD fill that other journals did not?

That is a question we have asked ourselves numerous times, especially during the infancy of the journal. I think the answer lies in merging the industry technology driver with the academic scientific pursuits. I think this avoided some of the historic weaknesses of some of the other journals in the field.

Can you recall any published findings that changed conventional thinking or led to a paradigm shift in the field? There were numerous times during my reviews of articles either as an associate editor or as the technical editor of the journal that I found articles interesting and contacted the research authors to gain more insight and modify some of the paths we had been pursuing within my company.

What are the greatest challenges that surfactant and detergent scientists should address in the next 20 years, and what role can JSD play in addressing those challenges?

I believe that creating the opportunity for younger scientists to share their minds while giving more experienced scientists to mentor and guide others is the single biggest role that JSD can play in the next 20 years.

Jean-Louis Salager, EIC, 2008 – 2014

© SpringerHow and why did you get involved with JSD?
In 1997, I received an invitation to submit an article in the first volume of JSD, probably from somebody who knew my work dealing with surfactants both in fundamental and applied aspects. Our R&D lab had introduced to a group from University of Pau in France a new concept called lipophilic linkerwith two fundamental articles published in Langmuir in 1993. However, the corresponding applied know-how had been kept confidential for 5 years because of the industrial sponsoring of the corresponding PhD carried out under a pharmaceutical contract. In 1998, the restriction disappeared and it was time to publish a complementary third paper for industry people. My idea was to send it to the Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology (JDST), an applied journal in the area, for which I had been the Latin America regional editor since 1986. However, the JDST actually was too applied for the content of our paper, which dealt with a quite new concept, thus forcing the readers to understand two fundamental articles from Langmuir. The problem was that if Langmuir had been recognized as a well-known American Chemical Society journal for academic researchers, it was, particularly at this time, too theoretical to be straightforwardly useful in practice for industry people.
Consequently, JSD was the appropriate alternative to publish our paper on the optimization of the lipophilic linker , which was both applied in its purpose and quite original as a practical solution to be attractive to industrial readership.
Hence it may be said that JSD matched very well our third paper’s purpose, because it was an original journal for AOCS readers working in industry, but with a higher scientific level than the Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology (UK) or Tenside Surfactants and Detergents (Germany), which were the practical application alternatives.
By the way my previous comments mean that the editorial decision people who started JSD at this time had a pretty good idea with this middle-of-the road purpose, which may be still called the most scientific applied level in surfactant science and technology. And this was probably for the same purpose that the first JSD volumes contained many review papers on practical topics, with a wonderful collaboration from industry people with a top notch know-how. Unfortunately this happened only for a few years.

In the following years ,my group contributed to publish in JSD a few papers dealing with both scientific and practical interests, including those in a new concept called extended surfactants that was introduced as an innovation in 1995. My personal contact at University of Oklahoma with Prof. John Scamehorn (a PhD student colleague of mine at University Texas Austin in the late 1970s) extended to Prof. David Sabatini; Dean Jeffrey Harwell; and PhD student Edgar Acosta, as well as industry researcher George Smith from Huntsman, who were all starting in the early 2000’s a new line of research following our concepts of so-called linkers and extended surfactants. Even if we did not really work on a common project, some exchanges with visits, seminars and discussions took place to make our research more complementary. In 2005,I prepared a review paper on how to optimize the solubilization in microemulsion and it seemed to be appropriate to ask my colleagues from University of Oklahoma to contribute with their own experience.
I don't actually know, but I suspect that the success of this review paper in JSD and maybe the suggestion of the University of Oklahoma co-authors who were associated with AOCS, brought my name forward as a candidate for the JSD editor-in-chief job in 2007.
I had left the direction on my lab in 2005, so in 2008 I was supposedly able to dedicate 20h/week to JSD editorship, and I accepted the offer.

What did you like most about your role with the journal?
I liked the original idea to create JSD with an intermediate purpose to provide original information that was neither too fundamental nor too technological, i.e. to divulge some practical science know-how useful for AOCS people working in research and development for industry.
My evaluation of JSD in 2008-2009 indicated that:
(1) The scientific level had to be elevated to improve the seriousness, in order to motivate the choice of both authors and readers for JSD which is a critical issue with the proliferation of fake peer-review journals particularly from predatory publishers from China and India;
(2) The originality of the article content had to be maintained and even improved to avoid junk papers without new findings, and to enhance the recognition, in particular through use and citations;
(3) The papers had to be targeted to industry people working in R&D — with an association of knowledge and know-how, which is not necessarily easy because most of the authors are either from academy or from industry, not from both;
(4) The topics had to be consistent with the surfactants and detergents area avoiding a too large variety — as in some super-expanded journals with 10,000 pages per year;
(5) The personal opinion of top-notch specialists with both fundamental and practical expertise had to be invited and promoted, particularly in review papers , to save time in the professional decision of the R&D readers who can read only a very limited percent of the literature.
What I liked more in the seven years I freely worked for JSD, was the challenge about all that, just with some ideas in journal editorship and from my mixed experience as an academic and industry scientist. It was a wonderful opportunity to try to improve a situation.

Lastly, a large part of my time was spent sharing my knowledge of scientific publishing during the review process. I really enjoyed this and felt it was especially useful for the younger contributors of JSD.

How did your involvement with JSD shape your career and/or the careers of your students?
I learned a lot about what to offer industrial partners in my group regarding scientific and technological combined research and to improve the corresponding publications. I guess that my EIC position helped me and my lab to be better known by industry.

What niche did JSD fill that other journals did not?
JSD is a kind of publication to be read by people working in industry R&D, and it has thus a middle-of-the-road position between the two extremes, i.e. from very fundamental to very applied. However, this is not currently the case for all JSD published papers. It would be nice to increase the number of articles which are a combination of knowledge and know-how on the corresponding subject, not only in reviews by experts but in original research papers too.

Can you think of any specific breakthroughs published in the journal that led to better or safer commercial technologies?
The surfactant formulation in microemulsions is better understood thanks to some papers in JSD (as well as other journals of course) and this will increase its possible applications, particularly in the petroleum industry. However it should be remembered that any innovative finding is generally published in different journals, congresses, and books, particularly special issues on a specific topic, often related to a symposium, which does not happen with JSD. Commercial technologies are developed by private R&D and divulged through patents often coming from thesis and journals articles, but often in a mysterious way. 

Journal of Surfactants and Detergents -A Brief History:

  • JSD was first published in 1998 to serve the needs of  the surfactants and detergents community by providing a forum for the publication of peer-reviewed articles and reviews  to broaden the understanding of the field and the industry.    
  • AOCS Surfactants & Detergents Division members played a key role in the development of the journal, guided its spinoff from The Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society (JAOCS), and  contributed to its growth.
  • Since 1998, S&D Division members have served as editors-in-chief, starting with the Michael F. Cox (1998-2004), whose editorial in the January 2017 issue of JSD talks more about the journal’s founding.
  • Growth has continued under the leadership of V. Mark Nace (2004-2008); Jean-Louis Salager (2008-2015); and George A. Smith (2015-present).
  • What began as a quarterly publication in 1998 had a strong enough submissions base to move to publishing six times a year in 2012.
  • Since 2007, when JSD began its publishing partnership with Springer, original submissions to the journal have tripled. (2007- 91 original submissions; 2016- 275 original submissions.)
  • The number of published manuscripts per year has grown from 58 in 1998 to 141 in 2016.

Read Guest Editorials to be published throughout 2017 to celebrate JSD’s anniversary:

Editors-in-Chief from past and present provide reflections on the growth of the journal and important events in its history, while a long-time editorial board member offers thoughts about the journal’s future.  

  • January: Michael F. Cox, EIC 1998-2004
  • March: V. Mark Nace, EIC 2004-2006
  • May: George A. Smith reflects on Milton Rosen
  • July: Jean-Louis Salager, EIC 2008-2015
  • September: Charles Hammond, 20-year editorial board member
  • November: George A. Smith, EIC 2015-present

Journal of Surfactants and Detergents—20th Volume Celebration Honoring Milton Rosen:

This special symposium honoring Milton Rosen will be convened on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at the AOCS Annual Meeting, at Orlando, Florida, USA. This symposium stands to be robust covering many topics related to surfactants and surfactants applications and should appeal to a wide audience.  The session will span topics including:  surfactant structure/property relations, gemini surfactants, silicone surfactants, application of the HLD model, surfactant/polymer interactions, and high throughput screening for formulation development. 

See the symposium program for more information!

About the Journal:

jsd-2017-20thaniv-cover-rgb-lr © SpringerJournal of Surfactants and Detergents is an official journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS).  It publishes scientific contributions in the surfactants and detergents arena. This includes the basic and applied science of petrochemical and oleochemical surfactants, the development and performance of surfactants in all applications, as well as the development and manufacture of detergent ingredients and their formulation into finished products.  

Visit the journal homepage to find out more!

We will keep adding anniversary special news in this special page throughout the year 2017.  Bookmark this page now!