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Environmental Sciences - Aquatic Sciences | Aquatic Sciences | Journals, Academic Books & Online Media | Springer

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Rolf P.M. Bak

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Rolf P.M. Bak

Professor Rolf P.M. Bak was appointed Editor in Chief of the Journal Coral Reefs on 1 July 2008.  

Professor Rolf PM Bak works at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and holds the chair of Tropical Marine Biology at the University of Amsterdam. He started his research on coral ecology in Curaçao (Antilles) in the 1970s, subsequently broadening the scope to include other groups of organisms, pelagic/benthic interactions, aspects of reef microbiology, impacts of catastrophes and related phase shifts, effects of anthropogenic changes in the marine environment. Though starting his research in the Caribbean, he has extensive experience in reef research in Indonesia and Polynesia. At present one of his interests is in coral intra-genus variation and the mechanisms involved in the distribution of closely related corals over large depth ranges.

Editorial Assistant: Dr. Elizabeth H. Gladfelter

Editorial Assistant: Dr. Elizabeth H. Gladfelter

Dr. Elizabeth H. Gladfelter is currently a Guest Investigator in the Marine Policy Center at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Massachusetts. From 1974 until 1991, she held positions at West Indies Laboratory, Virgin Islands, the last few years as Director. The main focus of her research has been coral organismal biology, particularly growth and calcification; her research has also included studies on coral reef fish and benthic ecology. At WHOI, her interests include policy decisions affecting individuals and institutions engaged in scientific research and education, and some of this work has resulted in a book, Agassiz’s Legacy: Scientists’ Reflections on the Value of Field Experience Oxford U. Press 2002).

Dr. Glenn Almany

Dr. Glenn Almany

Dr. Glenn Almany is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia. His research is broadly focused on the ecology of coral reef fishes, particularly in areas directly relevant to conservation and management. A current focus is measuring patterns of larval dispersal and population connectivity and translating this information into improved systematic conservation plans and fisheries management strategies. These projects involve partnerships with local fishing communities, governments and NGOs in Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Australia, as well as collaboration with researchers in a wide range of disciplines. He also conducts studies on the community ecology of coral reef fishes examining the influence of predation and competition on community structure, dynamics and diversity.

Prof. Anastazia Banaszak

Prof. Anastazia Banaszak

Professor Anastazia Banaszak is currently a Research Professor in the Unidad Académica de Sistemas Arrecifales (Reef Systems Academic Unit) a campus of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México located in the Mexican Caribbean. Her undergraduate education was at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia followed by her graduate degree at the University of California at Santa Barbara, USA and a postdoctoral appointment at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Maryland, USA.
Her research interests include the photobiology of corals and coral reef dwelling- organisms as well as temperate phytoplankton. Most recently she has become interested in coral reproductive biology and the culture of corals for use in reef restoration.

Dr. Ruth D. Gates

Dr. Ruth D. Gates

Dr Ruth D. Gates is an Associate Research Professor at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, a research unit embedded within the School of Earth and Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
This facility combines close proximity to a living reef with the capacity to support a full range of research activities that span field operations to functional genomics. Her work focuses on the mechanisms by which reef corals sense and respond to changes in the marine environment, and spans a range of scales from ecological to molecular. Within this context, her current research is aimed at obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of how the genetic composition and nature of the symbiosis between corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates partners maps onto the environmental resilience of the holobiont.
In addition, her research team is examining the impacts of land-based pollution on the biology of corals with the goal of developing a suite of proactive diagnostic tools for use in the management and conservation of Hawaii’s reefs.

Prof. Mark Hay

Prof. Mark Hay

Professor Mark Hay is the Teasley Professor of Biology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His coral reef research focuses on population and community ecology with special emphasis on plant-herbivore and predator-prey interactions, on the chemical cues and signals regulating these interactions, and on the cascading ecological and evolutionary consequences of these interactions for coral reef structure and function. The generality of his findings from coral reefs are commonly assessed in follow-on studies of temperate reefs, freshwater systems, or occasionally terrestrial communities.
His current research focuses on effects of herbivore biodiversity on structuring herbivore-algal-coral interactions on coral reefs, on how humans alter herbivore-algal-coral interactions, and on the role of chemical cues mechanisms on predicting these interactions. Most of his present work is conducted in Micronesia and the Caribbean.

Prof. Bernhard Riegl

Prof. Bernhard Riegl

Prof. Bernhard Riegl is Associate Professor at the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center. He is the associate director of the National Coral Reef Institute (NCRI). He received his MSc degree from the University of Vienna (Austria) in 1989 and PhD degree from the University of Cape Town (South Africa) in 1993. He also received the habilitation at Karl-Franzens-University Graz (Austria) in 2000.
Prof. Riegl's research centers on coral reefs and other tropical benthic biota, such as seagrass and algae. He is both a biologist and geologist, his research and publications have involved the paleontology, sedimentology, spatial dynamics, ecology, taxonomy and conservation biology of coral reefs and associated organisms. He is also active in hydrographic survey, particularly sonar-based seafloor discrimination, which he integrates with optical remote-sensing to provide high-resolution maps of the seafloor. He has worked in the Red Sea, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean, South Pacific, Eastern Pacific, tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.
Riegl held grants from many African, European, US and international agencies.

Dr. Stephen E. Swearer

Dr. Stephen E. Swearer

Dr. Stephen E. Swearer is an Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne, Australia and a research leader in the Victorian Centre for Aquatic Pollution Identification and Management. He has broad interests in marine population and community ecology, the evolution of life-history traits in fishes, aquatic ecotoxicology, and oceanography. His coral reef research focuses on the early life history of fishes and the importance of larval retention and dispersal to population replenishment. He currently is researching maternal and environmental impacts on larval behaviour and development, growth, dispersal, and survival.

Dr. Hugh Sweatman

Dr. Hugh Sweatman

Dr. Hugh Sweatman is a senior research scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science in Townsville, Australia. Initial interests in settlement behaviour of coral reef fishes and ecology of predatory fishes led to projects on fish predators and the dynamics of the crown-of-thorns starfish. Since 1995 he has been involved with monitoring reef fishes and benthic communities as part of a long-term program on the Great Barrier Reef. He has broad interests in ecology of coral reefs, including monitoring methods and interpretation of monitoring data, "reef health" and the effects of zoning in the Great Barrier Reef marine park.

Dr. Mark Vermeij

Dr. Mark Vermeij

Dr Mark J.A. Vermeij is the scientific director of the CARMABI research station on Curaçao, an island in the Southern Caribbean. His research interests include evolutionary and ecological dynamics of benthic marine organisms, with particular emphasis on corals, algae and, more recently, microbes. Currently, his work focuses foremost on the earliest life stages of corals and the processes that operate during these earliest life stages. The results of all scientific work conducted at Carmabi are disseminated through the organization local network (i.e., parks, museums, educational programs) to stakeholder groups that are directly or indirectly involved with coral reef management and conservation.

Prof. Robert van Woesik

Prof. Robert van Woesik

Professor Robert van Woesik is currently a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the Florida Institute of Technology, USA. He has worked on coral reefs since 1985. His research commenced on the inner Great Barrier Reef during graduate school at James Cook University, Australia. He extended his geographic range throughout Asia and the Pacific Ocean while faculty, for 8 years, at the University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan. He has recently initiated work in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean since joining the faculty at the Florida Institute of Technology in 2002. His research interests are broad but ultimately linked to the ecology of scleractinian corals, including spatial-temporal assessments and the application of this ecology to management. He is also interested in the effects of land-use change and environmental pressure on coral population dynamics. His approach is often multi-disciplinary utilizing a combination of techniques to examine mechanisms and processes that regulate coral population structure. Most recently he has become particularly interested in ecological questions relating to coral-algal symbioses and thermal stress at a global scale.