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Education & Language - Science Education | Visualization in Science Education

Visualization in Science Education

Gilbert, John K. (Ed.)

2005, XXXIX, 346 p.

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Visualization, meaning both the perception of an object that is seen or touched and the mental imagery that is the product of that perception, is believed to be a major strategy in all thought. It is particularly important in science, which seeks causal explanations for phenomena in the world-as-experienced. Visualization must therefore play a major role in science education. This book addresses key issues concerning visualization in the teaching and learning of science at any level in educational systems.

‘Visualization in Science Education’ draws on the insights from cognitive psychology, science, and education, by experts from Australia, Israel, Slovenia, UK, and USA. It unites these with the practice of science education, particularly the ever-increasing use of computer-managed modelling packages, especially in chemistry. The first section explores the significance and intellectual standing of visualization. The second section shows how the skills of visualization have been developed practically in science education. This is followed by accounts of how the educational value of visualization has been integrated into university courses in physics, genomics, and geology. The fourth section documents experimental work on the classroom assessment of visualization. An endpiece summarises some of the research and development needed if the contribution of this set of universal skills is to be fully exploited at all levels and in all science subjects.

Content Level » Research

Keywords » experiment - media - modeling - science - science education - visualization

Related subjects » Science Education

Table of contents 

Introduction-John K. Gilbert.- Section A: The significance of visualization in science education: 1. Visualization: A metacognitive skill in science and science education-John K. Gilbert. 2. Prolegomenon to scientific visualization-Barbara Tversky. 3. Mental models: Theoretical issues for visualizations in science education-David Rapp. 4. A model of molecular visualization-Michael Briggs, George Bodner. 5. Leveraging technology and cognitive theory on visualization to promote students’ learning-Janice D. Gobert.- Section B: Developing the skills of visualization: 6. Teaching and learning with three-dimensional representations-Mike Stieff, Robert Bateman, David Uttal. 7. Students becoming chemists: Developing representational competence-Robert Kozma, Joel Russell. 8. Imagery in physics: From physicists’ practice to naïve students’ learning-Galit Botzer and Miriam Reiner. 9. Imagery in science learning in students and experts-John Clement, Aletta Zietsman, and James Monaghan.- Section C: Integrating visualization into curricula in the sciences: 10. Learning electromagnetism with visualizations and active learning-Yehudit Judy Dori, John Belcher. 11. Visualizing the science of genomics-Kathy Takayama. 12. Visualization in undergraduate geology courses-Stephen J. Reynolds, Julia K. Johnson, Michael D. Piburn, Debra E. Leedy, Joshua A. Coyan, Melanie M. Busch.- Section D: Assessing the development of visualization skills: 13. Evaluating the educational value of molecular structure representations.-Vesna Ferk Savec, Margareta Vrtacnik, John K. Gilbert. 14. Assessing the learning from multi-media packages in chemical education-Joel Russell, Robert Kozma.- Endpiece.- Future research and development on visualization in science education-John K. Gilbert.

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