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Education & Language - Linguistics | Compounding in Modern Greek

Compounding in Modern Greek

Series: Studies in Morphology, Vol. 2

Ralli, Angela

2013, XIV, 302 p.

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  • One of the most carefully detailed studies of compounding in any language
  • Provides a thorough, data-rich and theoretically informed treatment of compounding in Modern Greek, which abounds in intricate compound structures
  • Compares Greek compounds with similar formations of languages that are genetically and typologically different ​

One of the core challenges in linguistics is elucidating compounds—their formation as well as the reasons their structure varies between languages. This book on Modern Greek rises to the challenge with a meticulous treatment of its diverse, intricate compounds, a study as grounded in theory as it is rich in data. Enhancing our knowledge of compounding and word-formation in general, its exceptional scope is a worthy model for linguists, particularly morphologists, and offers insights for students of syntax, phonology, dialectology and typology, among others.

The author examines first-tier themes such as the order and relations of constituents, headedness, exocentricity, and theta-role saturation. She shows how Modern Greek compounding relates to derivation and inflection, and charts the boundaries between compounds and phrases. Exploring dialectically variant compounds, and identifying historical changes, the analysis extends to similarly formed compounds in wholly unrelated languages.

Content Level » Research

Keywords » +learned compound constituents - -learned compound constituents - Allomorphs of Ancient Greek origin - Allomorphy in compounding - Compounds versus syntactic construction - Constraints, allomorphy and form of constituents - Coordinative compounds - Defining a Greek compound - Deverbal compounds with bound stems - Endocentric formations - Exocentric formations - Greek as a stem-based language - Headedness and classification - Modern Greek compounds - Stem-driven presence - Stress and morphological structure - The bare-stem constraint

Related subjects » Linguistics

Table of contents 

Acknowledgments .- Abbreviations .- Tables .- Introduction .- 1. Defining a Greek compound . 1.1 Introduction . 1.2 Greek as a stem-based language . 1.3 In search of a definition . 1.3.1Single stress . 1.3.2 Bound constituents . 1.3.3 Structural position . 1.3.4 Linking element . 1.3.5 Semantic opacity . 1.3.6 Lexical integrity . 1.3.7 Graphic unity . 1.3.8 Compounds versus syntactic constructions .1.4 Summary . 1.5 References .- 2. Grammatical category and constituents . 2.1 Introduction . 2.2 Nouns . 2.3 Adjectives . 2.4 Verbs . 2.5 Other categories . 2.5.1 Adverbs . 2.5.2 Compounds with a pronoun or a cardinal number . 2.6 Summary . 2.7 References .- 3 Compound marking . 3.1 Introduction . 3.2 Properties . 3.2.1 Stem-driven presence . 3.2.2 Lexically-marked absence . 3.3 Linking elements cross-linguistically . 3.4 Previous analyses . 3.5 Morphological status . 3.6. The parameter of overtly expressed paradigmatic inflection . 3.7 Position . 3.8 The morphological-category parameter . 3.9 Origin . 3.10 Summary . 3.11 References .- 4 Stress and morphological structure . 4.1 Introduction . 4.2 The type of inflection .       4.3 The position of stress . 4.4 Special categories . 4.4.1 Verbal compounds .    4.4.2 Compounds ending in a derived item . 4.4.3 Neuters in –i . 4.5 More compound structures . 4.6 Recursion in compounding . 4.7 Summary . 4.8 References .- 5. Headedness and classification . 5.1 Introduction . 5.2 Classification . 5.3 Headedness . 5.3.1 The notion of head . 5.3.2 Position . 5.3.3 Exocentricity . 5.4 Summary . 5.5 References .- 6. Constraints, allomorphy and form of constituents . 6.1 Introduction . 6.2 The Bare-stem constraint . 6.3 Apparent counter-examples . 6.3.1 Allomorphy . 6.3.2 Allomorphy in compounding . 6.4 Allomorphs of Ancient Greek origin . 6.4.1 Compound types . 6.4.2 –learned compound constituents . 6.4.3. +learned compound constituents . 6.4.4 Mixed types . 6.5 Summary . 6.6  References .- 7. Coordinative compounds . 7.1 Introduction . 7.2 What is a coordinative compound? . 7.3 Classification . 7.4 Headedness . 7.5 Historical development . 7.6 Coordinative compounds in Modern Greek dialects . 7.7 Summary . 7.8 References .- 8. Verbal and deverbal compounds . 8.1 Introduction . 8.2 Categories . 8.2.1 Exocentric formations . 8.2.2 Endocentric formations . 8.3 Compound-internal theta-role saturation . 8.4 Configurations . 8.5 Meaning . 8.6 Summary . 8.7 References .- 9. Deverbal compounds with bound stems . 9.1 Introduction . 9.2 State of the art . 9.3 Compounds or derived words? . 9.4 Grammatical category of bound stems . 9.5 Headedness and restrictions . 9.6 Productivity . 9.7 Summary . 9.8 References .-  10. Compounding versus derivation and inflection . 10.1 Introduction . 10.2 Compounding versus derivation . 10.2.1 Order of application . 10.2.2 Affixoids . 10.3 Compounding versus inflection . 10.4 Summary 10.5 References .- 11. Compounds versus phrases . 11.1 Introduction . 11.2 Properties of NPs . 11.3 Properties of compounds . 11.4 Phrasal compounds . 11.5 Phrasal-compound like phrases .11.6 Constructs . 11.7 Phrasal compounds versus syntactic formations . 11.8 Summary . 11.9 References .- Appendix I Greek: a brief history . 1. Periodization . 2. Geography – Dialectal variation . 3. References .- Appendix II       Greek inflection: an overview . 1. Verbal inflection . 2. Nominal inflection . 3. References .- Appendix III List of compounds .- Subject Index

 

 

 

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