Logo - springer
Slogan - springer

Economics | The Concept of Capitalism

The Concept of Capitalism

Scott, Bruce R.

2009, VIII, 76 p. 5 illus.

Available Formats:
eBook
Information

Springer eBooks may be purchased by end-customers only and are sold without copy protection (DRM free). Instead, all eBooks include personalized watermarks. This means you can read the Springer eBooks across numerous devices such as Laptops, eReaders, and tablets.

You can pay for Springer eBooks with Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Paypal.

After the purchase you can directly download the eBook file or read it online in our Springer eBook Reader. Furthermore your eBook will be stored in your MySpringer account. So you can always re-download your eBooks.

 
$9.95

(net) price for USA

ISBN 978-3-642-03110-6

digitally watermarked, no DRM

Included Format: PDF

download immediately after purchase


learn more about Springer eBooks

add to marked items

Softcover
Information

Softcover (also known as softback) version.

You can pay for Springer Books with Visa, Mastercard, American Express or Paypal.

Standard shipping is free of charge for individual customers.

 
$14.95

(net) price for USA

ISBN 978-3-642-03109-0

free shipping for individuals worldwide

usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days


add to marked items

  • The author is the Paul Whiton Cherington Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and has done extensive research and teaching in the field of economic strategies of nations
  • A very inventive, sharp-witted and thought-provoking analysis of the interrelation of capitalism, democracy and development, offering unequaled insight to the subject

A single system of economic governance – capitalism – prevails in the world today, both in theory and in practice. Yet there is neither a standard definition of capitalism nor a theory of how it works. Moreover, the most common conception of capitalism is that of a one-level system governed by markets, i.e., supply and demand, where many socioeconomic externalities are ignored. The purpose of this book is to counter this conception, showing that capitalism is more than markets. In fact, capitalism shares many parallels with everyday organized sports, in that both are indirect, three-level systems of governance where "freedom" is conditional on "playing by the rules." In organized sports, games (level 1) are shaped by official rules and monitored by referees (level 2), which are in turn regulated and revised by a governing organization (level 3) that oversees the sport as a whole. In capitalism, markets (level 1) are shaped by institutions and regulations and monitored by independent officials (level 2), which are in turn selected and shaped by a political authority (level 3) that oversees the system as a whole.

As simple and obvious as this parallel with organized sports may seem, the underlying cause of much of the economic instability of the last 25 years, and specifically of the current crisis, has stemmed from not understanding capitalism in this way, i.e., as a three-level system of governance. Only by improving our understanding of capitalism can we create better institutions and implement better policymaking to not only fix the present crisis of our capitalist system but also avoid future ones.

"Scott’s analysis of capitalism and democracy is striking both for its originality and for its rich policy suggestiveness and sheds an entirely new light on recent economic history" Charles Morris, author of "The Trillion Dollar Meltdown"

"An excellent case for thinking of capitalism as a system embodying political authority as well as markets and, after reading it, one wonders how one could ever have thought otherwise" Prof. Peter A. Hall, Harvard University

Content Level » Popular/general

Related subjects » Economics - Popular Science

Table of contents / Preface / Sample pages 

Popular Content within this publication 

 

Articles

Read this Book on Springerlink

Services for this book

New Book Alert

Get alerted on new Springer publications in the subject area of Economics.