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Business & Management | Journal of International Business Studies - A Palgrave journal

Journal of International Business Studies
Palgrave Macmillan UK

Journal of International Business Studies

Editor-in-Chief: Alain Verbeke
Managing Editor: Anne Hoekman

ISSN: 0047-2506 (print version)
ISSN: 1478-6990 (electronic version)

Journal no. 41267

Palgrave Macmillan UK

Collections

2016 

JIBS Collection: International Entrepreneurship

International entrepreneurship is a research domain that has inherently fuzzy and porous borders. As such, it is an area of scholarly inquiry that is varied and receptive to new ideas. We are preparing a JIBS special issue that will illustrate a wide range of international entrepreneurship research perspectives and approaches. Before this issue becomes available, to further help scholars from diverse traditions recognize ways in which they might join conversations about international entrepreneurship, we are pleased to offer this special collection of JIBS articles that represent three important and diverse themes in those conversations.
One theme is an attempt to understand the factors enabling internationalization under resource constraints. Pioneering research highlighted the importance of firm-specific resources and capabilities in allowing very new firms to sell successfully in foreign markets. These ideas have been extended to questions of how firms can overcome the resource constraints of smallness as well as newness, and to the impact of particular market conditions on international behaviors and performance. An important sub-theme focuses on the role of social networks in the pursuit of international opportunities by resource-constrained firms.
A second theme is aimed at shedding light on how firms internationalize under the resource constraints of newness or smallness. This research tends to emphasize the role of experience in explaining internationalization activities over time. The theoretical constructs highlighted include learning, routines, processes and practices. This research also seeks to apply ideas from the entrepreneurship literature – such as uncertainty, opportunity and disequilibria – to understand internationalization processes.
A third theme addresses questions about how entrepreneurship varies internationally. Attention has been focused on understanding how entrepreneurial characteristics, processes and behavior vary across institutional contexts. Given the resource constraints constituting barriers to successful entrepreneurship, scholars are also studying how the decision-making of financial resource providers varies institutionally. Recent research in this area has emphasized the provision of financial resources that support entrepreneurship in developing countries.
Articles in this special collection are listed below in reverse chronological order (most recent first). Special collections are by necessity limited in the number of articles they can contain, and we have chosen not to include Decade Award winning papers in the international entrepreneurship area, or the commentaries about them, since these articles are already influential and easily accessible.
Becky Reuber, Area Editor for International Entrepreneurship, Journal of International Business Studies

State Owned Multinationals: A JIBS Collection

State-owned multinationals (SOMNCs) have been recently rediscovered as an interesting type of firm to study, one that challenges some of the arguments of the theories of the multinational. In the 1970s, the initial studies of state-owned firms focused on understanding the logic and internationalization of these companies. However, the implementation of pro-market reforms throughout most of the world in the 1980s and 1990s led to the privatization of many state-owned firms and a diminishing interest in SOMNCs. In the late 2000s, however, there was resurgence of interest on the topic, partly because of the rapid expansion of a new set of emerging market multinationals, some of which were state-owned, and partly because of the appearance of various types of state-owned firms (majority, minority, indirect, sovereign wealth funds, etc.) that had not been studied before.
The study of state-owned multinationals connects several fields – economics and political economy and their study of state ownership of firms, and international business and its study of the internationalization of firms – that can provide new insights via cross-fertilization. These firms pose interesting challenges to the usual explanations for the existence of state-owned firms: one is rooted in economics and explains the existence of state-owned firms as a solution to market imperfections, and another in rooted in political economy and explains the existence of these firms as a result of the ideology of some governments in maintaining control over the economy. Foreign direct investments by state-owned firms seem to challenge both arguments, providing the foundation for developing new insights by analyzing these firms. Moreover, the state ownership of SOMNCs also poses challenges to the usual explanations of the behavior of multinational companies in international business, given that the government may impose non-business objectives on the companies that result in unusual patterns of internationalization not well explained in theories of the multinational.
As a result of the rediscovery of SOMNCs as an interesting research topic, and in view of the changes in the types of influence of the state on firms, we recently organized a special issue of JIBS on state-owned multinationals. This collection of JIBS articles complements that special issue by providing additional background for those interested in going deeper in the topic, with the articles presented in chronological order to facilitate a better understanding of how the study of SOMNCs has progressed.
Organising Editor: Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurra, Reviewing Editor, Journal of International Business Studies

2015 

Language: a JIBS Collection

Language in its various forms including national, corporate, technical, electronic, official, unofficial, lies at the heart of international business activities. Its features and functions define hierarchies and power relations sometimes facilitating sometimes hindering key IB processes such as integration and knowledge sharing across contexts. Understanding the complex interplay between the multiple facets of language and how they affect day-to-day business operations is becoming increasingly critical to global effectiveness. Read more…
Traditionally linked with communication or seen as an artifact of national culture in IB research, language has recently enjoyed a focus in its own right from multidisciplinary perspectives to render the field more sensitive to the existence and influence of languages and language use in the global corporate context.
Embracing different conceptual trajectories to inform their work, researchers have taken a variety of distinct focuses on language including understanding the effects of language on knowledge-sharing and innovation, the effect of English as a lingua franca in MNCs and the alternatives of a multi-lingua franca, the influences of language requirements on job performance, opportunities for promotion, as well as training and development, bilingualism and the role of biculturals in global teams.
To catalyze and set a course for the development of language as a new domain in IB scholarship, we recently ran a JIBS special issue on the theme of The Multifaceted Role of Language in International Business. To encourage the further articulation and theorization of language as a key construct in international business, we are pleased to offer this special Collection of JIBS articles concerned with understanding the forms, functions and features of language as they relate to IB.
Mary Yoko Brannen Deputy Editor, Journal of International Business Studies

2014 

The Eclectic Paradigm: a JIBS Collection

A major aim of this JIBS Collection is to enable scholars coming to the International Business (IB) field from a cognate discipline, perhaps for the first time, to be able to connect their own way of thinking about IB issues to a framework for IB analysis that is already established in our field. It is also hoped that the Collection will help to remind mainstream IB scholars of how the framework of the eclectic paradigm has emerged and developed, and of the contribution that JIBS has played in this development. As is well known among IB scholars, the eclectic paradigm was first incarnated as the eclectic theory (by John Dunning in 1977), but rather quickly metamorphosed into a paradigm, or a meta-framework for the conduct of IB analysis and IB concept or theory building. Read more…
While Dunning had initially been caught up in the enthusiasm of the early days of the genesis of the IB field to suggest a 'general theory' of the multinational enterprise (MNE) and the international production that MNEs organize around the world, he soon appreciated that the synthesis he proposed was instead a means by which the various relevant theories of international business could be identified (according to which question was being asked), and then suitably combined or compared as appropriate. The different theories of international business at that time, and subsequently, can be characterized as addressing selected aspects of the ownership (O), location (L) and internalization (I) advantages that are necessary for the emergence, growth and evolution of international production under common control across borders. Hence, the eclectic paradigm is also known as the OLI paradigm, and it provides a structure for bringing together and applying various kinds of theories of IB. The eclectic paradigm distinguishes between influences on IB activities associated with the nationality of ownership (O) or origin of firms engaged in IB, the extent of the internalization (I) of markets which affects the boundaries of the MNE, and the characteristics of the host location(s) (L) in which IB activities are sited. In other words, the eclectic paradigm is essentially about how to appropriately combine issues of firm and home country network-derived capabilities (O), transaction costs (I), and the resources, capabilities and institutions of locations as host production sites (L).
This analytical structure has laid a common foundation for a progressive conversation between different perspectives on IB that enables an increasing interchange to be conducted across various streams of research that might otherwise have found it difficult to relate to one another. While originally the eclectic paradigm helped us to bring together and compare mainly economic theories of IB, today its greater value is as a framework that has the potential to enable us to relate to one another IB theories derived from ideas taken from different disciplines and constructed at different levels of analysis. To help to promote a greater conversation between those interested in the theoretical explanation of IB activities from various different backgrounds or starting points, we are pleased to offer this special Collection of JIBS articles that concern the foundations and the application of the eclectic paradigm.
John Cantwell Editor-in-Chief, Journal of International Business Studies

Location: a JIBS Collection

In recent years an extensive range of new research has been revisiting the topic of the location of international business activities, from a variety of different perspectives and background interests. This work has been inspired in part by two apparently quite different but actually related contemporary trends: on the one hand, an emergence or revitalization of clusters of activities co-located in or around selected global city regions or fast growing metropolitan areas; and on the other hand, an increased global dispersion of activities conducted within the value chains managed or coordinated by many large multinational enterprises and their business partners. Read more…
The former trend has given rise to discussions of how the elite of the cultural-cognitive economy of the 21st century (in Allen Scott's terminology) or the creative class (Richard Florida's term) are now being drawn or brought back to major urban centers; while the latter trend is associated with debates over outsourcing, and the economic and social consequences of shifts in the ownership and location of distinct nodes of value chains once production systems become more fragmented and the component parts of such systems become more geographically dispersed.
An increased interest in the subject of international business location has been shown by scholars in Strategic Management, in Economic Geography, and in Regional Science, as well as in our own interdisciplinary field of International Business Studies. However, as is often the case in academic research communities, these bodies of scholarship have tended to develop at something of a distance from one another, each conversing internally more than they have with one another.
To help encourage a more direct exchange between these communities with a common interest in International Business Location, we recently ran a JIBS special issue on the theme of the Multinational in Geographic Space. To further help to promote a greater conversation between those interested in the topic of Location from various different backgrounds or starting points, we are pleased to offer this special Collection of JIBS articles that concern issues in the Location of International Business activities.
John Cantwell
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of International Business Studies

Location: a JIBS Collection

In recent years an extensive range of new research has been revisiting the topic of the location of international business activities, from a variety of different perspectives and background interests. This work has been inspired in part by two apparently quite different but actually related contemporary trends: on the one hand, an emergence or revitalization of clusters of activities co-located in or around selected global city regions or fast growing metropolitan areas; and on the other hand, an increased global dispersion of activities conducted within the value chains managed or coordinated by many large multinational enterprises and their business partners. Read more…
The former trend has given rise to discussions of how the elite of the cultural-cognitive economy of the 21st century (in Allen Scott's terminology) or the creative class (Richard Florida's term) are now being drawn or brought back to major urban centers; while the latter trend is associated with debates over outsourcing, and the economic and social consequences of shifts in the ownership and location of distinct nodes of value chains once production systems become more fragmented and the component parts of such systems become more geographically dispersed.
An increased interest in the subject of international business location has been shown by scholars in Strategic Management, in Economic Geography, and in Regional Science, as well as in our own interdisciplinary field of International Business Studies. However, as is often the case in academic research communities, these bodies of scholarship have tended to develop at something of a distance from one another, each conversing internally more than they have with one another.
To help encourage a more direct exchange between these communities with a common interest in International Business Location, we recently ran a JIBS special issue on the theme of the Multinational in Geographic Space. To further help to promote a greater conversation between those interested in the topic of Location from various different backgrounds or starting points, we are pleased to offer this special Collection of JIBS articles that concern issues in the Location of International Business activities.
John Cantwell
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of International Business Studies

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    The top-ranked journal in the field of international business, Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) is multidisciplinary in scope and interdisciplinary in content and methodology, publishing content from across the the six sub-domains of international business studies:

    (1) the activities, strategies, structures and decision-making processes of multinational enterprises; (2) interactions between multinational enterprises and other actors, organizations, institutions, and markets; (3) the cross-border activities of firms (e.g., intrafirm trade, finance, investment, technology transfers, offshore services); (4) how the international environment (e.g., cultural, economic, legal, political) affects the activities, strategies, structures and decision-making processes of firms; (5) the international dimensions of organizational forms (e.g., strategic alliances, mergers and acquisitions) and activities (e.g., entrepreneurship, knowledge-based competition, corporate governance); and (6) cross-country comparative studies of businesses, business processes and organizational behavior in different countries and environments.

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