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Biomedical Sciences - Neuroscience | Epilepsy - Animal and Human Correlations

Epilepsy

Animal and Human Correlations

McCandless, David W.

2012, XV, 532 p.

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  • This volume examines features of animal and human studies related to both simple and complex partial seizures.
  • Typical as well as atypical seizures are described whenever possible, studies in primates receive careful attention.
  • Rather than offering an inclusive survey of every published study relating to epilepsy in animals and humans, the book offers judiciously selected material with clear correlative relevance.

Correlation is a vital element in epilepsy research, especially given the condition’s notorious resistance to treatment. With a current ‘rate of translation’ estimated at between seven and nine years, and a translation ‘success rate’ of below 50 per cent, there is room for improvement in the correlative research exploring this intractable condition.

Epilepsy: Animal and Human Correlations offers judiciously selected material with clear correlative relevance. Arranged according to animal studies and related studies in the human population, each chapter covers clinical description, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuropathology, and treatment attempts. The human chapters have an additional section detailing studies based on counterpart animal studies, as well as covering promising further research suggested by animal results. The book includes a clear statement of the rationale for future human clinical investigations based on animal results.

The chapters cover animal and human studies related to both simple and complex partial seizures. It covers typical as well as atypical seizures, and includes material on some seizure disorders which resist neat classification. Studies conducted in the primate population receive careful attention

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

Epilepsy: Animal and Human Correlations offers judiciously selected material with clear correlative relevance. Arranged according to animal studies and related studies in the human population, each chapter covers clinical description, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuropathology, and treatment attempts. The human chapters have an additional section detailing studies based on counterpart animal studies, as well as covering promising further research suggested by animal results. The book includes a clear statement of the rationale for future human clinical investigations based on animal results.

The chapters cover animal and human studies related to both simple and complex partial seizures. It covers typical as well as atypical seizures, and includes material on some seizure disorders which resist neat classification. Studies conducted in the primate population receive careful attention

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

The chapters cover animal and human studies related to both simple and complex partial seizures. It covers typical as well as atypical seizures, and includes material on some seizure disorders which resist neat classification. Studies conducted in the primate population receive careful attention

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

 

 

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

About the Author:
The work of Dr. David W. McCandless spanned over 35 years of laboratory research into basic mechanisms of various metabolic encephalopathies. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Metabolic Brain Disease (Springer), now in its 27th year. Dr. McCandless served on the faculty or research staff at The University of Vermont College of Medicine, NIH-NINCDS, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, and The Chicago Medical School, and was a visiting professor at Washington University School of Medicine. Most recently, he served as the John J. Sheinin Professor of Anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL, USA.

Content Level » Professional/practitioner

Keywords » Partial seizures - epilepsy - neurophysiology - onset seizures - seizure disorders

Related subjects » Neurology - Neuroscience

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