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Astronomy - Cosmology | Aims and Scope: Transport in Porous Media

Aims and Scope: Transport in Porous Media

  • Publishes original research on physical, chemical, and biological aspects of transport in porous media
  • Papers on porous media research may originate in various areas of physics, chemistry, biology, natural or materials science, and engineering (chemical, civil, agricultural, petroleum, environmental, electrical, and mechanical engineering)
  • Emphasizes theory, (numerical) modelling, laboratory work, and non-routine applications
  • Publishes work of a fundamental nature, of interest to a wide readership, that provides novel insight into porous media processes
  • Expanded in 2007 from 12 to 15 issues per year

Transport in Porous Media publishes original research on physical and chemical aspects of transport phenomena in rigid and deformable porous media. These phenomena, occurring in single and multiphase flow in porous domains, can be governed by extensive quantities such as mass of a fluid phase, mass of component of a phase, momentum, or energy. Moreover, porous medium deformations can be induced by the transport phenomena, by chemical and electro-chemical activities such as swelling, or by external loading through forces and displacements. These porous media phenomena may be studied by researchers from various areas of physics, chemistry, biology, natural or materials science, and engineering (chemical, civil, agricultural, petroleum, environmental, electrical, and mechanical engineering).

Transport and deformation phenomena, understood from the microscopic scale upward, form the basis for deterministic and stochastic models that describe them. The models are adaptable to describe (coupled) transport phenomena and deformation in any kind of natural or engineered porous material, including: flow and contaminant transport in aquifers; oil and gas movement in petroleum reservoirs; solvent drives and enhanced oil recovery; heat and mass transport in packed bed reactors, in geothermal reservoirs, and in building materials; spread of pollutants from radioactive waste repositories; drying in porous materials; flow and transport in fuel cells, paper, and absorbing materials; filtration processes; biomedical studies of fluid and chemical transport in lungs and other organs. Also, coupling of porous media flow with other flow domains can be considered.